Author Archives: Alan

[NZASR] Cancellation of IAHR 2020 World Congress

Kia ora koutou

It is with great regret that we announce the cancellation of the 22nd World Congress of the IAHR which was to have been held in Otago, New Zealand.

Following our previous update on 10 March, we have continued to monitor the situation which (as we are sure you are all aware) has only become worse almost everywhere. Today, New Zealand has entered a period of total lockdown – no-one is permitted to leave their home except to fetch essential items of food and fuel, or for short walks in their neighbourhood. The borders are closed to all but New Zealand citizens, residents and their immediate family members.

The hope, of course, is that such a lockdown will eliminate the virus within New Zealand and allow a return to normal life. But there can be no certainty that this will succeed. Even (or perhaps especially) if New Zealand is successful in eliminating the virus here, there will continue to be tight restrictions on who can travel to New Zealand. It is already clear that we cannot possibly meet in August. We have considered a long postponement, but for many of us (including the local organisers) the first priority in the coming months will be providing teaching to our students in order to minimize the impact on their education. It is not at all clear even when we might begin to be able to plan with any certainty for a large international gathering in the near future. We have also considered also the possibility of holding a virtual Congress online, but New Zealand’s time zone and limited IT infrastructure means that we are not well-placed to do so.

We will contact separately those who have already registered for the Congress, to make arrangements to refund registration, accommodation and excursion fees paid in advance. In the current environment (everyone in New Zealand working from home) this may take a little while and we ask again for your patience.

The Executive Committee of the IAHR will make a further announcement about the consequences of the cancellation for the business meetings of the IAHR that would have been conducted in New Zealand.

We would like to extend our thanks to all those who submitted abstracts. We thank also the academic programme committee who reviewed the abstracts and to the many others who supported the Congress in different way, and in particular the officers of the IAHR Executive Committee. We look forward to meeting again in happier times!

Will Sweetman and Satoko Fujiwara
on behalf of the organising committee

The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) is Going Virtual

We are living through a public health emergency unprecedented in our lifetimes. This has thrown our inherent connection and the inequalities that fracture our societies into stark relief. It is changing many aspects of how we live and work and it will change the way that The Australian Sociological Association operates. 

TASA will be going virtual. Resources we put towards face-to-face activities will be redeployed towards virtual initiatives. Unfortunately, our 2020 TASA Conference scheduled for November at the ANU is postponed. We will announce a new date as soon as we can.
We will not be doing less this year, however. Hopefully we will be doing more. Many of us will need a moment to pause, to take in what is going on and adjust the way we live, including more time physically on our own or with family and the consequences that come with this.
As many have pointed out, this is a time when physical distancing is crucial but where we should remain as socially connected as we can. In the coming weeks we will announce how we will reshape our support for our members and for Thematic Group, Social Sciences Week and other TASA events.
Many of us need a moment to catch our breath but soon we will return to our sociology, whether concretely contributing to understanding the inherent social dimensions of the current crisis or the other important questions about how we live together that we will continue to pursue. We will need to work together to do this and TASA will facilitate it.
We will also need to laugh with each other and share experiences of the changes we face. So, we are also looking at how we keep the social dimension of TASA going in virtual platforms across the coming weeks and months.
At this stage I want to highlight

  • Our upcoming special section of Health Sociology Review on Sociology and the COVID-19 Pandemic, edited by Professor Deborah Lupton.
  • The first of our new lunch-time online seminars, Peta Cook on ‘Ageism and COVID-19’, April 23rd, 12:30pm – 1:30pm via Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/979751205 (will also be recorded and uploaded to TASA’s YouTube channel.)
  • Our Nexus blog is ready to receive your pandemic or non-pandemic related reflections. 
  • Our new all-member forum for your contributions on ‘Doing sociology in unsettled times’ 
  • We have also purchased a Zoom account that supports virtual events up to 100 participants. If you are a TASA member planning an event and would like to use this resource, please contact Sally Daly

We will announce other opportunities soon. 

Yours in sociology 

Dan Woodman (on behalf of the TASA Executive Committee) 

Call For Papers Extended Deadline – AAA 2020 Meeting: Laboring Hearts: Religion, Humanitarianism, and Volunteering in Uncertain Times

Abstract deadline extended to April 8, submit to Tatiana Rabinovich (trabino@ncsu.edu).

Please consider submitting an abstract for the proposed panel “Laboring Hearts: Religion, Humanitarianism, and Volunteering in Uncertain Times” at the AAA Meetings in St. Louis, MO, Nov 18-22, 2020.

This panel is organized by Dr. Tatiana Rabinovich (North Carolina State University) and Dr. Alisa Perkins (Western Michigan University). Abstracts should be no longer than 250 words.  Please send your abstract to Tatiana Rabinovich (trabino@ncsu.edu) by April 8. We will let you know if your paper has been selected for inclusion in the panel by April 13. Please see description below. We would be happy to answer any questions about the panel as it develops.

In times when many states are redefining their social responsibilities and embracing austerity, individuals are often called upon to help vulnerable populations by giving  their time, money, and labor to help those in need. Some who respond to these calls are driven by faith. This proposed panel studies intersections between religion, social justice, and power to understand the kinds of ethical subjectivities that are constituted through faith-driven volunteering, charity, and humanitarian work, broadly defined. The goal is to theorize how faith-inspired giving of time, resources, expertise, and labor illuminates the exigencies of late capitalism, as it pertains to citizenship, belonging, justice, and collective life. We will examine how political mobilizations, moral economies, and social imaginaries emerge from faith-inspired social justice work. We will analyze how those who give in the name of faith carve out spaces and resources for themselves and precarious others in ways that forge connections between the material and affective; the personal and political; and the intimate and global. We are interested in faith-driven giving practices that are structured by religious institutions or faith traditions, as well as those shaped within secular contexts and agencies. We welcome papers from scholars working  on a wide range of topics across the globe. 

The 25th Nordic Conference in the Sociology of Religion – Call for Papers deadline extended

The planning committee for The 25th Nordic Conference in the Sociology of Religion is monitoring the situation and development for the Corona virus closely, and will be following all the recommendations concerning travel and public events given by Swedish authorities. We will accordingly take any measures needed and publish our decisions promptly on our website. However, we are presently continuing the preparation process and are hopeful that the conference will take place as planned.

We realize that some of you might be concerned whether you will be able to attend. In order to give you all time to thoroughly evaluate the situation, we will be extending the deadline for abstracts until April 15. We will also not be accepting any payments for the conference until May 11.

We will keep you all updated on our website. https://lir.gu.se/forskning/konferenser/the-25th-nordic-conference-in-the-sociology-of-religion

Call for papers – Conference: Migrant Belongings Digital Practices and the Everyday

4-6 November 2020, Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Submissions for panels should be submitted via e-mail to ERC2020@uu.nl by 15 May 2020.

Abstracts should be submitted electronically, using the on-line
submission system<https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeR3DQF2QUikj6LYJo21FFw6tZBDvjyVKZ84KO9q7pFy_yPFQ/viewform> by 15 June
2020.

Convenor: Sandra Ponzanesi

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Paul Gilroy (University College London)

Engin Isin (Queen Mary, University of London)

Nicholas de Genova(University of Houston)

Larissa Hjorth(RMIT University, Melbourne)

Saskia Witteborn (Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Migrant belonging through digital connectivity refers to a way of being
in the world that cuts across national borders, shaping new forms of
diasporic affiliations and transnational intimacy. This happens in ways
that are different from the ways enabled by the communication
technologies of the past. Scholarly attention has intensified around the
question of how various new technical affordances of platforms and apps
are shaping the transnationally connected, and locally situated, social
worlds in which migrants live their everyday lives.

This international conference focuses on the connection between the
media and migration from different disciplinary vantage points.
Connecting with friends, peers and family, sharing memories and
personally identifying information, navigating spaces and reshaping the
local and the global in the process is but one side of the coin of
migrant-related technology use: this Janus-faced development also
subjects individual as well as groups to increased datafied migration
management, algorithmic control and biometric classification as well as
forms of transnational authoritarianism and networked repression.

This conference pays particular attention to the everyday use of digital
media for the support of transnational lives, emotional bonds and
cosmopolitan affiliations, focusing also on the the role digital media
play in shaping local/urban and national diasporic formations. This is
because it becomes increasingly important to give everyday digital media
usage a central role in investigations of transnational belonging,
digital intimacy, diasporic community (re)production, migrant subject
formation, long-distance political participation, urban social
integration and local/national self-organization.

Therefore we need to examine individual and collective user practices
within the wider historical and cultural contexts of media studies,
cultural studies and postcolonial cultural studies scholarship, attuned
to issues of politics and power, identity, geographies and the everyday.
This also creates new challenges for cross-disciplinary dialogues that
require an integration of ethnography with digital methods and critical
data studiesin order to look at the formation of identity and
experience, representation, community building, and creating spaces of
belongingness.

Contributions are welcome from any field of study that engages with
questions about how technology and social media usages mediate
contemporary migration experiences, not only within media and
communication studies, or digital and internet studies but also in
neighbouring disciplines such as anthropology, postcolonial studies,
gender studies, race studies, psychology, law, visual studies, conflict
studies, criminology, sociology, critical theory, political theory and
international relations.

Contributions that explore non-media-centric entry points by focusing on
users’ digital practices and foregrounding ethnographic exploration as a
uniting framework are especially welcome.

The conference is part of the ERC project CONNECTINGEUROPE, /Digital
Crossings in Europe: Gender, Diaspora and Belonging/:
http://connectingeuropeproject.eu/

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

   * Affective digital practices and the politics of emotion
   * Digital diaspora
   * Cosmopolitanism
   * Cities and urban belonging
   * Translocality and translationalism
   * Co-presence and togetherness
   * Cultural capital
   * Migrant visualization
   * Appification of migration
   * Platformization of migrant lives
   * Gender and critical race studies
   * The migration industry of connectivity
   * Digital ethnography
   * Transnational authoritarianism
   * Networked conflicts
   * Datafication and surveillance

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

Submissions for panels should be submitted via e-mail to ERC2020@uu.nl
<mailto:ERC2020@uu.nl> by 15 May 2020.

   * Submission for panels should include a chairperson, a rationale for
     the panel (250 words), and the names of three speakersincluding
     their abstract (250 words) and biographical note (150 words).

Abstracts should be submitted electronically, using the on-line
submission system<https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeR3DQF2QUikj6LYJo21FFw6tZBDvjyVKZ84KO9q7pFy_yPFQ/viewform>*by 15**June
2020.

   * Submissions for papers should include an abstract (max 300words) and
     short biographical note (150 words) about the author including
     her/his current position and interest in the field of digital media
     and migration.

Fore more infomation click
http://connectingeuropeproject.eu/home/conference/

For further question please mail: ERC2020@uu.nl 

New Issue of Journal of Law and Religion: Free until April 1

Silas W. Allard is happy to announce that the new issue of the Journal of Law and Religion has published. This new issue features as symposium on child law in Muslim jurisdictions, as well as review symposia on the work of John Witte and Cathleen Kaveny. The full issue can be read online for free until April 1, 2020 at https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-law-and-religion/latest-issue, and the table of contents is included below.

EDITORIAL – Silas W. Allard

Essay

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR HAREDIM IN ISRAEL – Tova Hartman, Chaim Zicherman

Research Articles

FROM LAW TO DHARMA: STATE LAW AND SACRED DUTY IN ANCIENT INDIA – Mark McClish
FAMILY, NATION BUILDING, AND CITIZENSHIP: THE LEGAL REPRESENTATION OF MUSLIM WOMEN IN THE BAN AGAINST THE BIGAMY CLAUSE OF 1951 – Rawia Aburabia

Symposium: Child Law in Muslim Jurisdictions

CHILD LAW IN MUSLIM JURISDICTIONS: THE ROLE OF THE STATE IN ESTABLISHING FILIATION (NASAB) AND PROTECTING PARENTLESS CHILDREN – Dörthe Engelcke, Nadjma Yassari
FILIATION AND ADOPTION AMONG MUSLIMS IN INDIA: THE QUAGMIRES OF A RELIGIOUS MINORITY LAW – Jean-Philippe Dequen
THE STATUS OF CHILDREN BORN OUT OF WEDLOCK AND ADOPTED CHILDREN IN INDONESIA: INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ISLAMIC, ADAT, AND HUMAN RIGHTS NORMS – Euis Nurlaelawati, Stijn Cornelis van Huis
A STEP TOO FAR? THE JOURNEY FROM “BIOLOGICAL” TO “SOCIETAL” FILIATION IN THE CHILD’S RIGHT TO NAME AND IDENTITY IN ISLAMIC AND INTERNATIONAL LAW – Shaheen Sardar Ali
ESTABLISHING FILIATION (NASAB) AND THE PLACEMENT OF DESTITUTE CHILDREN INTO NEW FAMILIES: WHAT ROLE DOES THE STATE PLAY? – Dörthe Engelcke

Book Review Symposium: On Pedagogy, Prophecy, and Public Engagement: The Recent Works of Cathleen Kaveny

PATHS AND PEDAGOGIES IN LAW AND ETHICS: ON CATHLEEN KAVENY, ETHICS AT THE EDGES OF LAW: CHRISTIAN MORALISTS AND AMERICAN LEGAL THOUGHT  – M. Christian Green
ON COVENANT, IRONY, PROVIDENCE, AND THE STANCE OF THE PROPHET: THOUGHTS IN LIGHT OF CATHLEEN KAVENY’S  – Ted A. Smith
TALKING CONTROVERSIES: WHY DIALOGUE MATTERS FOR LAW, RELIGION, AND MORALITY – A Culture of Engagement: Law, Religion, and Morality. – Jonathan Rothchild
TEACHING BALANCE, AUTONOMY, AND SOLIDARITY IN LAW: CATHLEEN KAVENY, LAW’S VIRTUESFOSTERING AUTONOMY AND SOLIDARITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY  – Kevin P. Lee

Book Review Symposium: John Witte, Jr., Church, State, and Family: Reconciling Traditional Teachings and Modern Liberties

PEDAGOGIES OF NATURAL LAW – Mark D. Jordan
FAMILY LAW ISOLATIONISM AND CHURCH, STATE, AND FAMILY  – Robin Fretwell Wilson
RELIGIOUS EDICTS, SECULAR LAW, AND THE FAMILY  – Michael J. Broyde
DEFAULT RULES AND PRIVATE ALTERATIONS – Brian H. Bix
THE ROLE OF THE STATE IN REGULATING THE MARITAL FAMILY  – Jonathan Chaplin
RESPONSE TO THE REVIEWERS – John Witte

IV ISA Forum of Sociology Update – Managing Covid-19 Risk

Dear all,

Greetings and salutations! In modern history, the world has never seen a global situation of the magnitude that we are witnessing these days. A serious threat emerged from coronavirus generating worries and even public panic. Yet, as Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization pointed out: “Our greatest enemy right now is not the virus itself. It’s fear, rumors and stigma. And our greatest assets are facts, reason and solidarity.”

The ISA is monitoring the updates from the World Health Organization with regards to the health risks associated with coronavirus and will act accordingly for the ISA Forum in July 2020. So far, we have adopted the following measures:

  1. Extension of the deadline for presenters’ registration to 19 April 2020
  2. Registration fees will be reimbursed:
    • To presenters who will not be able to attend because of state-mandated travel restrictions, unless they want to present their papers in virtual format
    • To attendees who will not be able to attend because of state-mandated travel restrictions
    • To everyone in case the Forum is finally cancelled for sanitary safety reasons

We will of course keep you informed of further developments.

Best regards,

Sari Hanafi
President, International Sociological Association
Professor of Sociology, American University of Beirut

Call for Expressions of Interest: Journal of Sociology Editorship 2021 – 2024

Expressions of interest should be emailed to TASA Admin by  9am Monday June 1, 2020.

You can read more about the Journal of Sociology here and keep up-to-date via Twitter: @JSociology

The TASA Executive seeks to appoint a new editorial team for the Journal of Sociology for the four-year term 2021–2024.

Journal of Sociology features high quality sociological scholarship in all its forms. We are dedicated to showcasing theory as well as applied sociology, quantitative and qualitative research. Interdisciplinary pieces are welcome, as are submissions from outside the academy. Based in the Southern Hemisphere and committed to intellectual works from the Asia-Pacific region, including Indigenous scholarship, we also encourage submissions from across the globe. 

The term of the current editors expires at the end of this year, although copy for the first issue of 2021 will be organised. The journal receives financial and administrative assistance from TASA and from the publisher, Sage. Manuscript submission is done on-line through ScholarOne.

All members of the editorial team (Editors-in-Chief and Associate Editors) must be TASA members and ideally will be located within a department of sociology or a School/unit that offers a major sequence of sociology, including doctoral studies. The Executive are willing to consider applications from an editorial team at a single university or a consortia of staff at two or more universities. Such consortia will be required to demonstrate that they have the capability to work effectively across locations. TASA will provide the Managing Editor with a complimentary TASA membership.

Applicants are also required to show that they have institutional support for the management of the journal, and to specify the nature of this support. Selection protocols and application instructions are available here.

Further information is available from the TASA President, Associate Professor Dan Woodman or from the current Editors in Chief, Associate Professor Kate Huppatz and Associate Professor Steve Matthewman.