Author Archives: Jim

Call for Papers: International Association for the Psychology of Religion

The International Association for the Psychology of Religion (IAPR) holds bi-annual conferences that serve as a meeting point for scholars from all over the world to share the latest research findings in the field.

We are pleased and honored to announce that the IAPR Conference 2019 will be held in Gdańsk, Poland and will take place from August 31st – September 3rd.

This year, we would like to summarize the current knowledge within the title Psychology of Religion and Spirituality: New Trends and Neglected Themes.

Please refer to the Conference website: https://poland2019.iaprweb.org/

  • Open registration: 1st of Nov. 2018
  • Deadline for abstracts: 1st of Feb. 2019

Organizers:

  • International Association for the Psychology of Religion
  • University of Gdańsk (Institute of Psychology)
  • Polish Society for the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality

Seeking reviewers for a special journal issue on gender, identity, and religion.

The journal Social Inclusion is preparing an issue on gender, identity and religion and is seeking reviewers for the submitted articles. 

The peer-review is expected to take place in February and the regular turnaround period for the review report is two weeks.   (Reviewers needing more days to complete the review are welcome to inform the journal’s staff).

If you are interested, please write:

António Vieira
si@cogitatiopress.com
Social Inclusion
Cogitatio Press
1070-129 Lisbon
Portugal

www.cogitatiopress.com/socialinclusion

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Seeing Religion in China: Visual Essays of Religious Sites

In order to better understand and demonstrate religion in China, the Center on Religion in Chinese Society at Purdue University invites submissions of visual essays, including pictures/videos and text, for a contest entitled “Seeing Religion in China: Visual Essays of Religious Sites.” CRCS will invite scholars and professional photographers to form a committee to judge the visual essays.

Due by April 30, 2019


PRIZES

  • Grand Prize: $1,000 (one award)
  • Second Prize: $500 (six awards)
  • Third Prize: $200 (30 awards)

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Each submission must focus on ONE specific religious site in Mainland China. A religious site can be a temple, a church, a mosque, or other type of site for religious activities.
Each visual essay should include 5 to 15 pictures (including short video clips) and 800-1,200 words (English or Chinese).
In addition to being visually attractive, the photos and text of the essays should tell a story or provide information about the religious site being depicted. This may include background and historical information, analysis of worshippers who visit the site, depiction of rituals carried out at the site, visual or textual representation of how the site is managed (leadership, relationship with state, etc.), or other relevant information. Visual essays may depict change over time, by including older photos of the site, or pictures of older and newer buildings on the same site. The text for the essay should contextualize the photos/videos, focusing on the religious site and worshippers rather than the author’s experience.
The visual essays may be presented in Word/PDF form, or may be submitted in another format, such as Esri Story Map. The photos/videos may be attached as higher resolution figures in addition to being found in the visual essays.
To learn more about photo essays, you are encourage to look at examples of recent photo essays from Time magazine and to read “Ways of  Seeing: The Contemporary Photo Essay” by Phil Bicker. 
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

  • Each participant may submit up to two visual essays.
  • Each essay should include 5 to 15 photos. (If videos are included, no more than three video clips, each no longer than 30 seconds.)
  • Essays must include complete information on the (formal) name and address of the religious site.
  • Photographs and video clips must be original, without alteration (standard optimization, such as cropping, adjustment to color and contrast, or removal of dust is acceptable).
  • Photographs should be in high-resolution JPEG format (ideally no smaller than 1920 pixels).
  • Each photo must include a caption of no more than 50 words.
  • All photographs/videos should be from the author, or list the source if not from the author. If a historical photograph is included in the essay, you must have the copyright or permission to use the image or ensure it is in the public domain.
  • The text of the essay must be 800-1,200 words in length.

In submitting a visual essay to this contest, participants agree to abide by the above instructions and acknowledge that the Center on Religion and Chinese Society holds the right to use all or parts of the visual essays, including photographs, videos, and text, in exhibitions, publications, websites and other non-commercial purposes without paying additional remuneration. The author will, however, be credited when his or her work is used.

The contest is open to all, regardless of age, sex, nationality, or country of residence. The awardees will be responsible for any taxes associated with the awards.

For details, see the CRCS website: https://www.purdue.edu/crcs/projects/visual-essay-ch/

Inquiries should be sent to crcs@purdue.edu.

DEADLINE

The deadline for submitting visual essays is April 30, 2019.
Winners will be announced by May 31, 2019.

Training Program: Research Methods for the Study of Contemporary Religion

Centre for Religion and Contemporary Society, University of Kent

25th of February to the 1st of March

This training programme is available for doctoral students registered at any higher education institution in the UK/EU and abroad. It is based on previous training developed by the Centre for Religion and Contemporary Society, funded by the AHRC, which led to the development of the Religion Methods website<http://www.kent.ac.uk/religionmethods>, and aims to provide students with a core training in fieldwork approaches to the study of religion.

Topics covered by the training will include:
  *   Conceptualising religion for research
  *   Key elements and processes of research design
  *   The role of theory in social research
  *   The politics and ethics of research
  *   Rigour and validity in research
  *   Using quantitative data-sets for research on religion
  *   Ethnographic approaches in theory and practice
  *   Developing research interviews
  *   Applying Gender and Sexuality perspectives in the study of religion
  *   Comparative sociological methods
  *   Historical methods in the study of religion
  *   Writing journal articles and Book proposals

To attend this training programme, students not registered at the University of Kent will be required to pay a £100 registration fee, which would cover attendance at all sessions and the costs of training materials. Delegates would need to make their own arrangements for accommodation, and there is a wide selection of affordable B&B provision in the Canterbury area. For those planning to commute on a daily basis, Canterbury is now less than an hour from London St Pancras on the high speed train link.

Space on the programme is limited and the deadline to register your interest to attend this programme is Tuesday 25 of January . To register your interest, please email Manoela Carpenedo ( M.carpenedo@kent.ac.uk<mailto:M.carpenedo@kent.ac.uk>) with a short statement outlining the university at which you are currently registered, the focus and method of your doctoral project and the stage of the project you are currently at.

CfP: Socrel Annual Conference "Communicating Religion" 9-11 July 2019

Sociology of Religion Study Group (SocRel) Annual Conference 2019

9-11 July 2019, Cardiff University

  • Charles Hirschkind (University of California-Berkeley)
  • Mia Lövheim (Uppsala University)
  • Jolyon Mitchell (University of Edinburgh)

As scholars of religion, we are all tasked with communicating religion in one way or another – to students, to the public, and to our research community. Moreover, what we study is itself a message: participants in our studies and creators of the documents we analyse are communicating religion, and what we receive as data is what Giddens referred to as the ‘double hermeneutic,’ or ideas and experiences that have already been mediated. What is the religion communicated to us? How do we communicate religion, and what is it that we communicate when we’re doing it?

Our focus is on “communicating” as a verb-like gerund rather than “communication” as a static, abstract noun. Scholars from different strands of the sociology of religion can imagine their work in it, and our topic engages the interests of colleagues in journalism, media and cultural studies; geography; music; English, communications and philosophy; social psychology; and law and politics.

The substance of communication can include evangelistic and apologistic discourse, education, media, and public policy interventions. We welcome diverse methodological approaches, including multi-modal and multi-sensory approaches to communicating religion. We understand communicating in multiple contexts, including academia, politics, education, social media and mass media. We imagine multiple frameworks that contour how we imagine communicating religion, encompassing the secular and the digital, the individual and the collective, the implicit and the explicit, the theoretical and the empirical.

To deliver a paper, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words. We will also be accepting a limited number of panel proposals. To deliver a panel, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words for each contributor.

Please submit your abstracts online, before midnight Friday 1 February 2019, at: https://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/abstract/Abstracts.aspx

Conference Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available to support postgraduate, early career, low income or unwaged SocRel members to present at the conference. Please visit https://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/24891/socrel-2019-bursary-application-form.docx for instructions, and to download an application form, and submit your bursary application along with your abstract by 1 February 2019.

Socrel is mindful of the various sensitivities people carry concerning content. If you feel that the presentation you give may include material that may be upsetting, please consider including a note about this content in your abstract. We will not restrict or censor presentations that include sensitive or alarming content, but by flagging it in the abstract, those who attend the conference can make informed decisions on which panel they might choose to attend.

  • Abstract submission: Open now
  • Early bird registration opens: 3 November 2018
  • Abstract submission closes: 1 February 2019
  • Decision notification: 15 February 2019
  • Presenter registration closes: 29 March 2019
  • Early bird registration closes: 7 June 2019
  • Registration closes: 28 June 2019

Please note that after 7 June 2019, a £50 late registration fee will apply to all bookings.

Should you have other questions about the conference please also contact the conference organisers, Dr Michael Munnik (Cardiff University) or Dr Peter Hemming (Cardiff University) socrel19@cardiff.ac.ukmailto:socrel19@cardiff.ac.uk

For further details, visit the SocRel website: www.britsoc.co.uk/groups/study-groups/sociology-of-religion-study-group/<http://www.britsoc.co.uk/groups/study-groups/sociology-of-religion-study-group/> For further details about the BSA visit www.britsoc.co.uk<http://www.britsoc.co.uk/>

Call for Papers: Human Rights Working Paper Series

Dedicated to interdisciplinary and critical dialogue on international human rights law and discourse, the Rapoport Center’s Working Paper Series (WPS) publishes innovative papers by established and early-career researchers as well as practitioners. The goal is to provide a productive environment for debate about human rights among academics, policymakers, activists, practitioners, and the public.

Authors from all disciplines and institutions are welcome to submit papers on any topic related to human rights.
Submissions undergo a rigorous selection process by the WPS interdisciplinary editorial committee, which includes graduate students and faculty from across the University of Texas. The WPS committee provides detailed comments and feedback to authors before the paper is published online.

Publication in the WPS does not preclude future publication elsewhere; in fact, many of our working papers have since been published in academic journals and edited volumes.

For the 2018-9 series, the Editorial Committee is accepting submissions on a rolling basis.
For more information, please visit: rapoportcenter.org/working-paper-series/ or contact rcwps@law.utexas.edu.

Journal of Dharma Studies

Journal of Dharma Studies

Philosophy, Theology, Ethics, and Culture

Journal of Dharma Studies Philosophy, Theology, Ethics, and Culture

We are delighted to announce the inaugural issue of the Journal of Dharma Studies.

The concept of the Journal of Dharma Studies arose from the scholarship produced by a learned society, the Dharma Academy of North America (DANAM), which has been meeting annually for over fifteen years in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion (AAR). Over this time, nearly a thousand scholars have participated in or attended the conferences of DANAM and helped foster analytical-constructive and translational research and scholarship on various fields and sub-disciplines. All of which comprise the diverse expressions of the Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist religious traditions.

All articles published with Dharma Studies will be free to access until 2020. We hope you will enjoy the first issue and will sign up to receive the table of contents of every new issue published.

If you have any questions about the journal do not hesitate to contact the editors-in-chief.

Rita D. Sherma, Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, USA
Purushottama Bilimoria , Graduate Theological Union and University of California, Berkeley, USA; The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Call for Papers: The Study of Apocalyptic and Millenarian Movements

The Centre for the Critical Study of Apocalyptic and Millenarian Movements (CenSAMM) is pleased to announce its first annual conference, to be held at the University of Bedfordshire (Bedford Campus) 27-28 June 2019.

The theme of the conference is The Study of Apocalyptic and Millenarian Movements: Critical and Interdisciplinary Approaches.

The aim of the conference is to facilitate critical and interdisciplinary discussion of apocalypticism, millenarianism and associated movements across time, place, and culture, and will cover academic fields such as anthropology, archaeology, biblical studies, critical theory, cultural studies, history, literary studies, political studies, psychology, religious studies, sociology, etc. The interdisciplinary scope is broadly understood to include methodologies, comparative approaches, and showcasing of research more specific to individual fields of expertise.

Speakers include:

  • John J. Collins (Yale Divinity School)
  • Vanessa Harding (Birkbeck College, University of London)
  • Bill McGuire (University College London)
  • Sarah Rollens (Rhodes College)
  • Beth Singler (University of Cambridge)
  • Fatima Tofighi (EUME, Berlin/University of Religions, Qom)
  • Paul-Francois Tremlett (Open University)

We invite individual paper proposals from scholars at all stages of their career, including postgraduates, and we welcome suggestions for group panels. Please submit proposals to conference@censamm.org. Submissions for papers should include a 300-word abstract and short CV.

Deadline for proposals: 31 March 2019.

Please see the Censamm website for more information: https://censamm.org/conferences

Call for Papers: Religiosity in East and West: Conceptual and Methodological Challenges

The Cluster of Excellence “Religion and Politics” and the chair of the sociology of religion at University Münster as well as the chair of practical theology at University Siegen are organizing the conference “Religiosity in east and West – Conceptual and Methodological Challenges” in Münster, Germany, on 25-27th June 2019. The conference results from collaboration between Dr. Sarah Demmrich (psychologist of religion, Post-Doc at the chair of sociology of religion) and Prof. Dr. Ulrich Riegel (Professor for practical theology and religious education).

Proposal deadline: January 15, 2019

We welcome contributions with a scope on the psychology of religion, the sociology of religion as well as on theology. Additionally, we would be glad to attract scholars from different cultural backgrounds. Please submit a paper abstract (250 – 300 words) to Sarah Demmrich by January 15, 2019.

Conference description:

The concept of religiosity as a highly individual aspect of religion and its research was shaped in Protestant circles in the Western context (Belzen, 2015). It inspired a huge body of research and further developments in the psychology of religion, the sociology of religion, and theology. In non-Western contexts, however, this concept has been proven only partially effective for the description and measuring of religiosity. This observation raises the question if research on religiosity is a science of Western Christianity (Cutting & Walsh 2008; Hill & Hood, 1999). Even within the Western context the present concepts and instruments are only partially applicable to measure religiosity in highly religious individuals adequately. For example, an orthodox belief, which is practiced in some Protestant Free Churches, often does not contradict with life in a modern society (Vermeer & Scheepers, 2017). This observation raises the question if the contemporary conceptualizations and operationalization of religiosity are too strongly oriented towards the ideal of an enlightened and individualized belief.

In light of these two observations, the Münster conference discusses the established concepts of religiosity and aims to expand them by alternative concepts where appropriate. For example, genuine approaches from non-Western cultures can add to the contemporary discourse of religiosity research (e.g., concepts of Muslim or Hindu religiosity). Similarly, a new understanding of highly religious milieus, which are – against the secularization theory – growing in modern societies, can stimulate a new concept of religiosity beyond individualized belief (e.g., Fresh Expressions, Mega Churches).

Besides conceptualizing non-individualized religiosity, another challenge is the application of measures that grew out of the classic concepts of religiosity to the non-Christian and/or non-Western context (Dover, Miner, & Dowso, 2007; Ghorbani, Watson, Sarmast, & Chen, 2018). However, first approaches of religion- and culture-sensitive measures for different contexts have been developed during the last years (e.g., Abu-Raiya & Pargament, 2011; Ağılkaya-Şahin, 2015; Kamble, Watson, Marigoudar, & Chen, 2014; Loewenthal & Solaim, 2016; Ok, 2016). These do not only allow a more differentiated description of such religiosities, but also facilitate a valid research on its correlates. However, there has been only a few of such alternative measures of non-individualized religiosity until today and more instruments of this kind are needed which proof appropriate to various cultural contexts.

Conference details:  https://www.uni-muenster.de/Soziologie/organisation/religiosity_east_and_west.shtml