Category Archives: Announcements

Date and Location for SocRel 2020 conference

Dear colleagues,
I am pleased to circulate the date, location and list of speakers for the next Socrel Annual Conference

Celebrating SocRel at 45: Beyond Binaries in the Sociology of Religion
14 July – 16 July 2020
University of York

Keynote Speakers:

  • Dr Sarah Jane Page (Aston University)
  • Professor Sam Perry (University of Oklahoma)
  • Further speaker TBC

Special 45th Anniversary Panel:

  • Professor Eileen Barker (London School of Economics)
  • Professor Jim Beckford (Warwick University)
  • Professor Grace Davie (Exeter University)
  • Professor Linda Woodhead (Lancaster University)

A full call for papers including conference theme, abstract submission and registration links as well as further conference information will be circulated in the next few weeks. But in the meantime, please do pop this date in your diaries and we look forward to seeing you in York next year!

Should you have any questions or queries, then please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Best wishes,
Rachael  (Socrel conference and events officer)
Dr Rachael Shillitoe
Research Associate
School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston, Birmingham
B15 2TT

Sociology of Islam Journal Editorial Board and International Advisory Board Invitation

Dear all,

We have been publishing Sociology of Islam Journal since 2013, published by Brill. As you all know, we also have Sociology of Islam and Muslim Societies Academic Network which has more than 3700 academic subscribers from 460 universities and 73 different countries. All of our subscribers are academics. We removed non-academics from the network in 2016.

Please see our issues at the following homepage: https://brill.com/view/journals/soi/soi-overview.xml

So far, we have published 6 volumes. This year, we are updating our editorial and international advisory board.

If you would like to serve as a member of associate editor or a member of international advisory board, please email me your current CV.

An associate member will review 2 or 3 articles per year or will find reviewers for the articles.

An international Advisory board member will review one article per year.

If you are interested in becoming a part of our team, please let us know by January 21st.

Best to all,

Tugrul Keskin

Professor

Director of Center for the Global Governance

Shanghai University

Email: tugrulkeskin@t.shu.edu.cn

Forthcoming:

  • Rethinking China-Middle East Relations in the Age of Neoliberalism with Mojtaba Mahdavi (Brill 2019)

Recent Books:

·         Middle East Studies after September 11 Neo-Orientalism, American Hegemony and Academia. Brill, 2018. https://brill.com/view/title/26757

·         U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East: From American Missionaries to the Islamic State. Routledge, 2018. https://www.routledge.com/US-Foreign-Policy-in-the-Middle-East-From-American-Missionaries-to-the/Gresh-Keskin/p/book/9780815347149

Editor of Sociology of Islam Journal (Brill)

http://www.brill.nl/sociology-islam

Region Editor of Critical Sociology (Middle East and North Africa)

http://crs.sagepub.com/

Article Notice: Comparing 19th-century kosher debates with contemporary halal debates

John Lever has recently published a paper comparing debates about kosher meat and Jewish immigration to England in the 18/19th centuries with contemporary controversy over halal meat and Muslim immigration in the 20/21st centuries.

Lever, J. (2018) Halal meat and religious slaughter: from spatial concealment to social controversy – breaching the boundaries of the permissible? Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space.

Announcement of new publication

I would like to inform you of my short essay recently published in the latest Reset Doc dossier on the 2018 Turkish elections. The essay which is about the voting behavior(s) of Turkish citizens abroad is part of my on-going project about transnational politics and diaspora-making.
 
You can access the essay at the following link: https://www.resetdoc.org/story/voting-abroad-question-loyalty/.
 
Kind regards,
Sinem A.

New Pew Study Released

Being Christian in Western Europe

The majority of Europe’s Christians are non-practicing, but they differ from religiously unaffiliated people in their attitudes toward Muslims and immigrants, views on God, and opinions about religion’s role in society

WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 29, 2018) – Western Europe, where Protestant Christianity originated and Catholicism has been based for most of its history, has become one of the world’s most secular regions. Although the vast majority of adults say they were baptized, today many do not describe themselves as Christians. Some say they gradually drifted away from religion, stopped believing in religious teachings, or were alienated by scandals or church positions on social issues, according to a major new Pew Research Center survey of religious beliefs and practices in Western Europe.

Yet most adults surveyed still do consider themselves Christians, even if they seldom go to church. The survey shows that non-practicing Christians (defined, for the purposes of this report, as people who identify as Christians, but attend church services no more than a few times per year) make up the biggest share of the population across the region. In every country except Italy, they are more numerous than church-attending Christians (those who go to religious services at least once a month). Non-practicing Christians also outnumber the religiously unaffiliated population (people who identify as atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular,” sometimes called the “nones”) in most of the countries surveyed.

The Pew Research Center study – which involved more than 24,000 telephone interviews with randomly selected adults, including nearly 12,000 non-practicing Christians – finds that Christian identity remains a meaningful marker in Western Europe, even among those who seldom go to church. It is not just a “nominal” identity devoid of practical importance. On the contrary, the religious, political and cultural views of non-practicing Christians often differ from those of church-attending Christians and religiously unaffiliated adults.

Indeed, Christian identity in Western Europe is associated with higher levels of negative sentiment toward immigrants and religious minorities. On balance, self-identified Christians – whether they attend church or not – are more likely than religiously unaffiliated people to express negative views of immigrants, as well as of Muslims and Jews.

For example, in the UK, 45% of church-attending Christians say Islam is fundamentally incompatible with British values and culture, as do roughly the same share of non-practicing Christians (47%). But among religiously unaffiliated adults, fewer (30%) say Islam is fundamentally incompatible with their country’s values. There is a similar pattern across the region on whether there should be restrictions on Muslim women’s dress in public, with Christians more likely than “nones” to say Muslim women should not be allowed to wear any religious clothing in public.

Churchgoing Christians, non-practicing Christians and religiously unaffiliated people also differ in their attitudes on nationalism. Non-practicing Christians are less likely than church-attending Christians to express nationalist views. Still, they are more likely than “nones” to say that their culture is superior to others and that it is necessary to have the country’s ancestry to share the national identity (e.g., one must have Spanish family background to be truly Spanish).

For instance, in France, nearly three-quarters of church-attending Christians (72%) say it is important to have French ancestry to be “truly French.” Among non-practicing Christians, 52% take this position, but this is still higher than the 43% of religiously unaffiliated French adults who say having French family background is important in order to be truly French.

The survey, which was conducted following a surge of immigration to Europe from Muslim-majority countries, asked many other questions about national identity, religious pluralism and immigration.

Most Western Europeans say they are willing to accept Muslims and Jews in their neighborhoods and in their families, and most reject negative statements about these groups. And, on balance, more respondents say immigrants are honest and hardworking than say the opposite.

But a clear and consistent pattern emerges: Both church-attending and non-practicing Christians are more likely than religiously unaffiliated adults in Western Europe to voice anti-immigrant, anti-minority and nationalist views.

There also are other factors beyond religious identity that are closely connected with these positions. For example, higher education and personally knowing someone who is Muslim tend to go hand in hand with more openness to immigration and religious minorities. And identifying with the political right is strongly linked to anti-immigration stances. Still, even after using statistical techniques to control for these factors (and several others, including age and gender) Western Europeans who identify as Christian are more likely than those who have no religious affiliation to express negative feelings about immigrants and religious minorities.

Other key ways in which non-practicing Christians, churchgoing Christians and religiously unaffiliated adults in the region differ include:

• Although many non-practicing Christians say they do not believe in God “as described in the Bible,” they do tend to believe in some other higher power or spiritual force. By contrast, most church-attending Christians say they believe in the biblical depiction of God. And a clear majority of religiously unaffiliated adults do not believe in any type of higher power or spiritual force in the universe.

• Non-practicing Christians tend to express more positive than negative views toward churches and religious organizations, saying they serve society by helping the poor and bringing communities together. Their attitudes toward religious institutions are not quite as favorable as those of church-attending Christians, but they are more likely than religiously unaffiliated Europeans to say churches and other religious organizations contribute positively to society.

• The vast majority of non-practicing Christians, like the vast majority of the unaffiliated in Western Europe, favor legal abortion and same-sex marriage. Church-attending Christians are more conservative on these issues, though even among churchgoing Christians, there is substantial support – and in several countries, majority support – for legal abortion and same-sex marriage.

• Nearly all churchgoing Christians who are parents or guardians of minor children (those under 18) say they are raising those children in the Christian faith. Among non-practicing Christians, somewhat fewer – though still the overwhelming majority – say they are bringing up their children as Christians. By contrast, religiously unaffiliated parents generally are raising their children with no religion.

These are among the key findings of the new Pew Research Center survey. The study, funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John Templeton Foundation, is part of a larger effort by Pew Research Center to understand religious change and its impact on societies around the world.

Read the report: http://www.pewforum.org/2018/05/29/being-christian-in-western-europe/

For more information, or to arrange an interview with the study’s lead authors, Associate Director of Research Neha Sahgal and Director of Religion Research Alan Cooperman, please contact Anna Schiller at (+1) 202-419-4372 or aschiller@pewresearch.org.

###

Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world. It does not take policy positions. The Center is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts, its primary funder. Subscribe to our daily and weekly email newsletters or follow us on ourFact Tank blog.

Publication announcement

Institute for Asian Muslim Studies, Waseda University, Proceedings of the International Workshop on Halal Food Consumption in East and West (with Appendix of Survey Report), Institute for Asian Muslim Studies, Research Paper Series, Vol.5. Institute for Asian Muslim Studies, Waseda University, Tokyo, March 2018 (ISBN: 9784990740245).   This is downloadable from here:

https://www.waseda.jp/inst/ias/en/publication/institute-for-asian-muslim-studies/

[Scripta] New Issue Published

Dear Colleagues

We are happy to announce the publication of: Scripta Instituti Donneriani Aboensis Vol. 28 (2018)

Theme: The Ethnic and Religious Future of Europe

Available in open access at: https://journal.fi/scripta

The current issue consists of articles based on presentations given at the conference with the same name arranged in Turku/Åbo, Finland in June, 2017.

Scripta is published by the Donner Institute in Åbo, Finland. Its purpose is to publish current research on religion and culture and to offer a platform for scholarly co-operation and debate within the field. The articles have been selected on the basis of peer-review.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

Ruth Illman
The Donner Institute

***

Table of Content (Vol. 28)

EDITORIAL

The ethnic and religious future of Europe

RUTH ILLMAN, PETER NYNÄS, TUOMAS MARTIKAINEN

ARTICLES

The demographic factors that make Islam the world’s fastest-growing major religious group

CONRAD HACKETT, MICHAEL LIPKA

The NPW framework in future-oriented studies of cultural agency

MATTI KAMPPINEN

Legitimacy for some

FREDRIK PORTIN

Humanity and hospitality

RENÉ DAUSNER

Islam’s increased visibility in the European public sphere

DIDEM DOGANYILMAZ DUMAN

A critical discourse analysis of the media coverage of the migration crisis in Poland

JOANNA KROTOFIL, DOMINIKA MOTAK

Reconsidering the modern nation state in the Anthropocene

WARDAH ALKATIRI

From Yidishe khasene to civil marriage

MERCÉDESZ CZIMBALMOS

Income inequality and religion globally 1970–2050

JOSE NAVARRO, VEGARD SKIRBEKK

 

Chapter: Does European Islam Think? By Mohammed Hashas 2018

This may interest some of you.
 

“Does European Islam Think?” By Mohammed Hashas

Abstract:
In this chapter I present two major divergent lines of thought that read European Islam differently, though this difference has hardly been problematised and remarked before, nor has it been put face to face in a scholarly debate. This chapter then presents the views of two major scholars of Islam and Muslims in Europe: those of the French scholar Olivier Roy, and those of the Danish scholar Jørgen S. Nielsen. My own reading of European Islam makes me stand with the latter on his position: European Muslims are making their own theology; it is a pluralist theology in progress. It may even be inspiring to the Arab-Islamic world.
Mohammed Hashas, “Does European Islam Think?” In Niels Valdemar Vinding, Egdūnas Račius, and Jörn Thielmann, eds., Exploring the Multitude of Muslims in Europe: Essays in Honour of Jørgen S. Nielsen (Brill, 2018), pp. 35-49.
The chapter is attached as pdf

Studies in Honor of Professor Saba Mahmood

Rethinking Politics and Religion: Studies in Honor of Professor Saba Mahmood

                                               Special issue of Sociology of Islam

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418

https://brill.com/view/journals/soi/soi-overview.xml

On the sad news of the passing of Saba Mahmood, the editorial board of the journal Sociology of Islam has decided to organize a special issue to honor the work and legacy of our distinguished colleague for the study of global politics and religion.

Saba Mahmood’s anthropological work shifted debates on secularism and religion, gender and politics, the rights of religious minorities, and the impact of colonialism in the Middle East. Her conceptual engagement with these pertinent social and political issues, however, has opened up broader questions about the politics of religious difference in a secular age beyond the Middle East and Muslim majority countries. This special issue of Sociology of Islam intends to bring to the fore the scope of these contributions in order to assess the cross-disciplinary and transregional magnitude of her work. The editorial board calls for papers on the following and related subjects in the work of Saba Mahmood:

–          Agency and submission;

–          Body/Embodiment;

–          Citizenship;

–          Ethics;

–          Feminist Theory;

–          Gender;

–          Hermeneutics;

–          Law and the State;

–          Postcolonialism/Postcoloniality;

–          Religious freedom;

–          Religious difference;

–          Secularism/Secularity;

–          Sovereignty;

–          Subject formation;

–          The minority condition.

If you are interested in contributing to this special issue, please send a 500-word abstract to Sultan Doughan (sultan_doughan@berkeley.edu) and Jean-Michel Landry (jean-michel.landry@mcgill.ca) by 30 April 2018. We acknowledge receipt of all emails and will reply to all. If you do not receive a reply, please resend your abstract. Please include the following in your email:

–          Author name;

–          Affiliation;

–          email address;

–          abstract in Word format;

–          a short CV.

Acceptance notices will be sent by 15 May 2018. Full articles are due 30 September 2018. The special issue will come out in early 2019 (2019/2). All articles must follow the guidelines provided in the attachment to this email.