Category Archives: Calls for Session Proposals

Call for Papers: “Communicating Religion’s Relevance”

82ND ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION 

Program Theme: “Communicating Religion’s Relevance”

Location: San Francisco, California
Hotel: Hotel Nikko San Francisco, 222 Mason Street

Date: August 7 (welcome reception) – August 9 Program

Program Chair: Brian Starks, Kennesaw State University

Although scholars of religion are keenly aware of the relevance of religion in today’s world, too often social elites and academics diminish the importance of religion. Even scholars who are well aware of religion’s relevance sometimes do an inadequate job explaining how religion permeates practically every aspect of social life. As sociologists of religion, we understand the relevance of religion to individuals as well as its consequences in the social, cultural, political, and economic dimensions of modern societies. The 2020 annual meeting’s thematic sessions will focus on several key topics:

  • What is the role of sociologists of religion in communicating the relevance of religion to their (our) fellow academics and to the broader public?
  • Are there ways that various sectors of our society have misunderstood, or failed to fully understand, religion, which sociologists of religion can remedy?
  • How do social and political elites, as well as ordinary citizens, employ religion when communicating about, or working to address, issues of local, national, or international concern?
  • How do social actors, including social movement leaders, draw upon religion and religious narratives to frame social problems? To appeal to human cognition, emotion, and morality?
  • What are religion’s unique features that distinguish it from other social phenomenon and help explain its distinct capacity to influence human and social life?
  • How, and under what circumstances, does religion contribute to new forms of identity, community, meaning, expression, moral conviction, and social control? How do we, as sociologists of religion, communicate religion’s relevance in these facets of our lives, to others?

Papers and sessions may be thematic or focus on any topic within the sociology of religion. Those that pursue and stimulate new avenues of research and innovative theoretical and methodological approaches are especially encouraged.

Specialty sessions, including book salons, teaching and professional development, and discussions that focus on a particular question, are also welcome.

DEADLINES:

  • Session proposals: March 31, 2020
  • Paper abstract submissions: April 30, 2020

All submissions should be made through the ASR website at www.sociologyofreligion.com

ASR Membership is required for organizing a session, presenting a paper, serving as a panelist, or holding another role in the program. All are expected to register for the meeting by July 1, 2020.

For questions, contact:

Call for Proposals: The 25th Nordic Conference in the Sociology of Religion

17th-19th August 2020
Gothenburg, Sweden

Religious Organisation(s): Challenges and changes in contemporary society

In today’s globalised and fast changing society, religious organisation and religious organisations face several challenges: Globalization, migration and different secularisation processes, together with political, technological and environmental changes/issues, influence, not only society in general, but also religious organisations and the ways in which religion is practiced and expressed in contemporary society. This situation prompts questions such as:

  • · How do religious organisations handle an influx of new members from other parts of the world and at the same time, an increased loss of members who have been there for a long time?
  • · How do religious organisations react to new technology such as digital communication instead of face-to-face interaction, and web-broadcasted religious meetings?
  • · How do religious groups and organisations handle the late modern individual who has little need of belonging to religious groups, and who is sceptical of religious authority?
  • · How can we explain why late modern individuals choose to belong to conservative and fundamentalist religious groups?

These, and other, questions concerning how religion is organised in contemporary society will be addressed at the 25th NCSR conference held in Gothenburg, Sweden 17th-19th August 2020, which includes a pre-conference for doctoral students in the morning of 17th August.

Dates

  • 15th November 2019          Deadline for submission of session proposals (paper sessions, panels, posters, authors-meets- critics, workshops etc.)
  • 15th Mars 2020                   Deadline for submission of abstracts for papers (max. 200 words)

Information on abstract format and delivery, programme, registration, venue etc. will be available at the conference website:https://lir.gu.se/forskning/konferenser/the-25th-nordic-conference-in-the-sociology-of-religion

The conference is hosted by Department of Literature, History of Ideas, and Religion, at Gothenburg University.

We look forward to seeing you in Gothenburg,

  • · Magdalena Nordin, magdalena.nordin@lir.gu.se
  • · Daniel Enstedt, daniel.enstedt@lir.gu.se
  • · Mia Lövheim, mia.lovheim@teol.uu.se
  • · Martha Middlemiss Lé Mon, martha.middlemiss@teol.uu.se

The 25th Nordic Conference in the Sociology of Religion

17th-19th August 2020, Gothenburg, Sweden

Religious Organisation(s) – challenges and changes in contemporary society

In today’s globalised and fast changing society, religious organisation and religious organisations face several challenges. Globalization, migration and different secularisation processes, but also/together with political, technological and environmental changes/issues, influence, not only society in general, but also religious organisations and the ways in which religion is practiced and expressed in contemporary society. This situation prompts questions such as:

How do religious organisations handle an influx of new members from other parts of the world and at the same time, an increased loss of members who have been there for a long time? How do religious organisations react to new technology such as digital communication instead of face-to-face interaction, and web-broadcasted religious meetings?

Other questions of interest are for example: how do religious groups and organisations handle the late modern individual who has little need of belonging to religious groups, and who is sceptical of religious authority? And, on the other hand, how can we explain why late modern individuals choose to belong to conservative and fundamentalist religious groups?

These, and other, questions concerning how religion is organised in contemporary society will be addressed at the 25th NCSR conference held in Gothenburg 17th-19th August 2020, which includes a pre-conference for doctoral students in the morning of the 17th August.

https://lir.gu.se/forskning/konferenser/the-25th-nordic-conference-in-the-sociology-of-religion

Dates

  • 15th November 2019                 Deadline for submission of session proposals (paper sessions, panels, posters, authors-meets- critics, workshops etc.)
  • 15th Mars 2020   Deadline for submission of abstracts for papers

We look forward to seeing you in Gothenburg,

Call for Session Proposals: ISA 4th Forum of Sociology–Deadline March 15, 2019

Call for Sessions
ISA Forum of Sociology
Porto Alegre, Brazil July 14 -18, 2020
Research Committees, Working and Thematic Groups of the International Sociological Association solicit session proposals for the forthcoming Fourth ISA Forum of Sociology.
Session proposals (250 words) in English, Spanish and/or French must be submitted by March 15, 2019 through the ISA online system available at: https://www.isa-sociology.org/en/conferences/forum/porto-alegre-2020

No extension of deadline is possible.

Kind regards,
International Sociological Association

Call for Sessions: 4th Forum of Sociology, Porto Alegre, Brazil — July 14-18, 2020

RESEARCH COMMITTEE 22: SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

Call for Session Proposals
4th ISA Forum of Sociology
July 14-18, 2020
(Session proposals due March 15, 2019)

“Challenges of the 21st Century for Sociology of Religion

Program Coordinators:
Eloísa Martín, United Arab Emirates University, UAE
Juan Cruz Esquivel, University of Buenos Aires/ CONICET, Argentina
Roberta Bivar Carneiro, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil

The debate on religion, its role, its development, and its future has been intense, extensive and sophisticated during the last few decades. Religion is both a central phenomenon itself and a key variable that can be used to explain economic, social, and political phenomena.  Both facets require continuous in-depth research. In recent years, many sociologists have begun to identify limits to the current approach to religious phenomena, and especially to the definitions of religion developed in the West. A number of authors have extended this critique to the ways sociologists currently explain and interpret “religion” in the 21st Century. Though still emerging, such accounts have opened new paths by which sociologists of religion can face both the empirical and theoretical challenges of our era.

We invite proposals for sessions that focus both on the discussion and analysis of current religious phenomena, and especially on how – theoretically and methodologically – the sociology of religion has been dealing and should deal with these issues in the 21st Century. While proposals may focus on single perspectives or phenomena, we encourage those  that explore the nexus between different theoretical and methodological approaches. We welcome session proposals that examine the relationship between religion and democracy, ecology, inequality, diversity, intersectionality, human rights, social movements, digital activism, and migration, among others.

The ISA CONFEX website will be open for session proposals from February 4 – March 15, 2019 24:00 GMT. Sessions may only be submitted through the CONFEX site.  Programme coordinators cannot include sessions sent by email or include sessions submitted after the CONFEX system is closed.  Surf to http://bit.ly/2Gj9N0N to enter the CONFEX site.

Please, note that you must be an RC-22 member to submit a session proposal. You may also not chair a session in which you present a paper. In such cases, we suggest that you identify someone else to chair the session.

We welcome both pre-organized sessions (with pre-chosen panellists) and topical sessions that are open to paper proposals by others. You may propose regular paper sessions, Author-meets-critics sessions, and Roundtable sessions. Sessions should be designed to have 4-5 participants, plus several standby participants.  We wish to include as many scholars as possible, particularly from the global South.

In late March, the Program Coordinators will choose which sessions will appear on our program.  Once the sessions are chosen, individual paper proposals can be submitted through the CONFEX website from April 25 – September 30, 2019 24:00 GMT.  We will circulate another announcement with details of how to submit paper proposals before then.

Please address your questions to any of the Program Coordinators:

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A COPY OF THIS CALL FOR SESSIONS

SSSR 2019 Call for Papers


Diversifying the Social Scientific Study of Religion: The Next Seventy Years

St. Louis, Missouri, USA
October 25-27

At a time of unparalleled communication among societies; at a time when religion holds both the power to bring conflict and the power to bring peace; at a time when pluralism and globalization are recasting what it means to study religion; it is the right time to celebrate and champion nuanced diversity in the social scientific study of religion. We need studies that bring together scholars from different social locations and different disciplines in service of a deeper understanding of diversity. We need studies that examine how religion sits alongside, influences, and is influenced by other social locations, identities and institutions:  social institutions where religion is important. We need studies that examine different nation and state contexts. We need studies that compare different religious traditions as well as understand the varieties of non-religion. We need studies that examine diverse publics as well as initiatives, which translate our research to and receive feedback from diverse publics. As we both critically examine the past while charting the vision for the future of the social scientific study of religion, we invite papers and panels that address some aspect of diversity in the social scientific study of religion.

Submissions Open: February 1, 2019
Submissions Close: March 31, 2019
Decision Notification: April 30, 2019

Please direct all inquiries to the SSSR 2019 Program Chairs:

Ryon Cobb, School of Social Work, the University of Texas at Arlington

Justin Tse, Asian American Studies Program, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, Northwestern University

Sociology of Religion Study Group (SocRel) Annual Conference 2019: “Communicating Religion”

9-11 July 2019, Cardiff University

Charles Hirschkind (University of California-Berkeley)

Mia Lövheim (Uppsala University)

Jolyon Mitchell (University of Edinburgh)

As scholars of religion, we are all tasked with communicating religion in one way or another – to students, to the public, and to our research community. Moreover, what we study is itself a message: participants in our studies and creators of the documents we analyse are communicating religion, and what we receive as data is what Giddens referred to as the ‘double hermeneutic,’ or ideas and experiences that have already been mediated. What is the religion communicated to us? How do we communicate religion, and what is it that we communicate when we’re doing it?

Our focus is on “communicating” as a verb-like gerund rather than “communication” as a static, abstract noun. Scholars from different strands of the sociology of religion can imagine their work in it, and our topic engages the interests of colleagues in journalism, media and cultural studies; geography; music; English, communications and philosophy; social psychology; and law and politics.

The substance of communication can include evangelistic and apologistic discourse, education, media, and public policy interventions. We welcome diverse methodological approaches, including multi-modal and multi-sensory approaches to communicating religion. We understand communicating in multiple contexts, including academia, politics, education, social media and mass media. We imagine multiple frameworks that contour how we imagine communicating religion, encompassing the secular and the digital, the individual and the collective, the implicit and the explicit, the theoretical and the empirical.

To deliver a paper, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words. We will also be accepting a limited number of panel proposals. To deliver a panel, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words for each contributor.

Please submit your abstracts online, before midnight Friday 1 February 2019, at:

https://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/abstract/Abstracts.aspx

CFL: The Sixth Annual Conference of the British Association for Islamic Studies

*The deadline for abstracts (individual papers and panels) has been extended until 6 January 2019*

15 April – 16 April 2019 (Arrival and Registration from 14 April)
University of Nottingham

Following BRAIS’s successful conferences in Edinburgh (2014), London (2015 and 2016), Chester (2017) and Exeter (2018), the organisers invite proposals for whole panels or individual papers for the Sixth Annual Conference of BRAIS. Islamic Studies is broadly understood to include all disciplinary approaches to the study of Islam and Muslim societies (majority and minority), modern and premodern.

Plenary sessions at the conference

  • – Maribel Fierro (CSIC, Madrid) on ‘Rulers as Authors in the Medieval Islamic West’
  • – Khaled Fahmy (University of Cambridge) on ‘Implementing Shari’a in Modern Egypt: A Medical Perspective’
  • – Alison Scott-Baumann (SOAS, London) and the ‘Re/presenting Islam on Campus’ team

Abstract Deadline: Sunday 6 January 2019

For details on how to submit an abstract, see here <http://www.brais.ac.uk/conferences/brais-2019-call-for-papers>

Early CFP: Association for the Sociology of Religion Annual Meeting

Our Program Committee is hard at work planning for our 2019 meeting in New York, “Engaging Religion in a Contested Age.” You can look forward to two engaging joint ASA/ASR sessions, an insightful Presidential Address by our President, Paula D. Nesbitt, a thought-provoking Furfey Lecture, and plenty of socializing opportunities during our three evening receptions. In fact, our welcome reception on August 11 will be a joint reception with the ASA Religion Section.

Our meeting will be held at the Park Central New York Hotel located at 870 Seventh St., just a few steps from the ASA hotel. Stay turned for hotel reservation information so you can get the discounted ASR price on a room. Rooms with king beds will be $185/night, and rooms with two double beds will be $205/night.

INTERESTED IN SUBMITTING A COMPLETED SESSION PROPOSAL OR PAPER ABSTRACT?

Complete session proposals are due by March 31, and paper abstracts are due by April 30. All submissions will be accepted through the Member Portal on the ASR website. Stay tuned for additional information regarding when the submission process opens. If you have any questions about the program content of our meeting, please contact our 2019 Program Chair, Holly Folk, at holly.folk@wwu.edu.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN THE ANNUAL MEETING IS AVAILABLE

Please visit the Grants & Awards page on the ASR website for information on the Gallagher Travel Grants along with other grant and award opportunities.

www.sociologyofreligion.com

Call for Session & Paper Proposals: EASR Conference, June 2019

17th Annual Conference of the European Association for the Study of Religions (EASR) ’Religion – continuations and disruptions’

25-29 June 2019 in Tartu, Estonia
https://easr2019.org/

Religions are works in progress. New ideas, doctrines and practices have appeared time and again and often spread across cultural and confessional boundaries. Some of the changes have been intentional, introduced by powerful individuals and institutions, others have emerged more spontaneously as vernacular reactions to innovations imposed from ?above?. Some elements in religions have persisted for centuries, some have disappeared and some reappeared in completely new forms or acquired new meanings. Similar processes can be observed around us in contemporary societies as well.

Yet, oftentimes scholars of religion have struggled with studying such constantly changing and transforming phenomena. This leads us to ask how many disruptions or interruptions can a tradition adapt or even embrace, while still maintaining its identity. At the same time studying change (or the lack thereof) arises several conceptual and methodological problems. First of all, how does one conceptualize change without implying a static research object? This is also a problem of evaluation and rhetorical power ? who has the authority to claim that something is extinct or that a new tradition has been established? What is the scholar?s responsibility for the field of studies? When and to what extent do scholars have to take into account the views of insiders in reflecting upon religious traditions or in drawing boundaries between them?

Aside from ?conventional? religion and religiosity, considering various ?spiritualities? and the rise of the numbers of people with no clear religious affiliation, how does one study a phenomenon which has lost its visibility or moved into the private sphere?  Or how does one make sense of the continuities and disruptions in a world where more and more people simultaneously participate in several traditions, either religious or secular?

The conference will focus on these and related questions, examining religious traditions worldwide. In addition, it calls for reflecting upon continuities and disruptions in the history of religious studies. Our conceptual tools, theoretical frameworks, methodologies and even the category of religion have been changing. Is it necessary to strive for unity in the discipline or rather celebrate the pluralism in the study of religions? And how to depict change, so that the complicated dynamic of religious transformation is also reflected through the conceptual tools we use?

Papers may include (but not be limited to) following topics:

  • – conceptual and theoretical reflections on terms and models
  • – methodological challenges in the study of ?invisible? religion and nonreligion
  • – transformation and persistence in and of religious education
  • – social, political and gendered aspects of religious change
  • – tradition and creativity in vernacular religions
  • – discursive and ritual practices: continuity, change, disruption
  • – encounters and interactions between religious communities
  • – entanglements of media, digital world and religiosity
  • – inspirations, actions and reactions between religion and migration
  • – psychological, ecological and cognitive aspects of religious change and continuity
  • – agents and victims of change and disruption
  • – religious liminality and residuality
  • – materiality of religion

Important dates

  • Call for session proposals: 15th of September 2018 – 31st of October 2018
  • Notification of acceptance of panels on the 10th of November 2018
  • Call for individual papers: 15th of November 2018 – 15th of December 2018
  • Notification of acceptance: 15th of January 2019

Registration:

  • Early bird registration 1st of February – 31st of March 2019
  • Standard registration  1st of April – 31st of May 2019