Category Archives: Journal Announcements

Call for Papers: Journal “Religions” – special issue on religion, law, and politics

Contributions due by 18 December 2020

A new call for a special issue on religion, law, and politics for those of you who might be interested:

https://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/special_issues/rlp

Religion, law, and politics are bodies of knowledge and institutionalized rules that generate order and control uncertainty. With modernity, the dominant liberal paradigm is aimed at differentiating categorically between them (M. Weber, J. Habermas, J. Rawls), separating their respective logics and “places” in society. In times of transformation and crisis, however, this “art of separation” (M. Walzer) cannot be taken for granted. For instance, religion has taken new political forms and entered into legal battles in the public sphere (L. Zucca and C. Ungureanu). Conversely, political and legal groups have become ever more involved in regulating moral-religious conflicts that divide people living under both democratic and non-democratic regimes. Nationalist-populist forces have often articulated their rhetoric by drawing on religious topoi and myths and galvanizing religious groups in society (C. Bottici; B. Challand). These phenomena have been articulated differently depending on the socio-historical context, and recent challenges have blurred and complexified the relation between religion, law, and politics. It is reasonable to assume, moreover, that the current COVID-19 crisis will further fuel religious effervescence and reactions, as well as new forms of authoritarianism.

This Special Issue contributes to the advancement of a renewed hermeneutics focused on the complexities of the relation between politics, law, and religion in the current “unsettled” times (A. Swidler), marked by multifaceted crises (ecological, democratic, epidemical), impacts of both migratory flows and situations of immobility, and the consequent rise in uncertainty. We welcome both theoretical and empirical (case or comparative) studies taking into consideration different historical contexts, religions, and spiritualities. This Special Issue is interdisciplinary and open to contributions from the social sciences (e.g., sociology, political science, anthropology), the humanities (e.g., religious studies, philosophy, history, critical theory, gender studies), and the arts (e.g., literature). It also welcomes contributions from decolonial and postcolonial studies that question the actual links between religion, law, and politics and propose new articulations for our understanding of religion and society.

We look forward to receiving contributions by 18 December 2020.

Call for papers: Journal -“Transformation in Afro American Religions”

Abstract and a short bio statement by 1st of November at the latest

Here is a Call for Papers for a special issue of the Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society. The topic of the special issue which will be guest edited by Gerald Hödl (Vienna) and myself, is the transformation of African derived American religions. The journal is published by Brill, fully open access (no costs for the authors as the journal is sponsored by the research centre Religion and Transformation at the University of Vienna). More information in the link:https://www.religionandtransformation.at/fileadmin/user_upload/p_religions_transformation/J-RaT/Call_for_papers_From_Syncretism_to_Hybridity.pdf

If you are interested please email us (hans.hoedl@univie.ac.at and b.schmidt@uwtsd.ac.uk). We will need abstract and a short bio statement by 1st of November at the latest. The article (if accepted) will be due in July 2021. Feel free to circulate the CfP. Thank you.

Call for Papers: Journal for the Academic Study of Religion – special issue on “Religion, Spirituality and the New African Diaspora” (Forthcoming 2021)

Abstract of up to 300 words and a brief biography by 31 July 2020

Full details available at:  https://journals.equinoxpub.com/JASR/announcement

In contrast to the African diaspora created through the slave trade, the “new” African diaspora is the product of recent and voluntary human movement (Okpewho & Nzegwu 2009), as individuals, families and communities have sought asylum, education, employment and other opportunities outside Africa. Recognizing that continuities and changes in religious and spiritual practices are a foundational aspect of diasporic experience, and that religion can be the “motor” of migration and migrant identity formation (Adogame 2007), this special issue is open to research articles on all aspects of religion, spirituality and the new African diaspora. We are particularly interested in studies from the Asia-Pacific region, but welcome articles focusing on any part of the world. 

Call for Manuscripts: Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion Volume 13 (Forthcoming 2022)

Deadline Submission of proposals: June 30, 2020

Jews and Muslims in Europe: Between Discourse and Experience

Edited by Samuel Sami Everett (University of Cambridge) and Ben Gidey (Birkbeck, University of London)

The Jew and the Muslim are historically among the primary figures of alterity in Europe, the constitutive outsiders who have shaped what Europe is, notably around questions of conflict, migration and integration. However, on the ground contemporary Jewish and Muslim communities have often been at the forefront of critical engagement with these questions, for example with regard to the Mediterranean migration crisis and heightened societal security concerns.

Although the academic evidence indicates negative attitudes to Jews and to Muslims in Europe correlate with each other in wider society, in the current century public discourse has instead emphasized growing antagonism between them. Commentators have pointed to Muslims as perpetrators of antisemitism in France, Germany, and the UK; others have pointed to the growing alignment between organized Jewish community bodies and the rising populist tide. However, scholarship tends to concentrate on only one of these narratives, while ethnographic insight suggests that in urban neighbourhoods, relations are often complex but not necessarily conflictual.

This volume seeks to engage with meta-discourses of alterity and diversity and the complexity of everyday encounter and relation to add comparative perspective for the better understanding of historical and contemporary European discourses towards and the experiences of Jews and Muslims in Europe. To explore these questions we invite authors to contribute theoretical and historical perspectives and/or empirical analyses.

Listed below are a few additional areas authors might like to address:

  • Attempts to retrieve earlier (real or imagined) periods of conviviality
  • State and local state discourse and policy
  • Day to day commercial exchange and banal street contact
  • Cultural traffic within the music, museum, and arts scenes
  • Media and community media

Please send proposals (400 words) and a brief bio to Dr Sami Everett (se365@cam.ac.uk)

Deadline Notification of acceptance: September 30, 2020

Deadline completed manuscripts (7,000 words): April 30, 2021

Call for Papers: Special Issue ‘Historizing Islamophobia’, Journal of the Contemporary Study of Islam

Guest Editor: Randa Abdel-Fattah, Macquarie University

The Journal of the Contemporary Study of Islam invites articles for a special issue related to the theme of Historizing Islamophobia. Islamophobia is often explained as a problem of behaviour and attitudes, effacing the world-historical thick contexts in which Islamophobia emerged as a form of racism constitutive in the making of the modern world. As we approach the twentieth anniversary of 9/11, this special issue is interested in papers that take a critical stance towards the dominant framing of 11 September 2001 as the ‘starting point’ of Islamophobia. The global war on terror may have begun on 9/11, ushering in a new ‘crisis’ to justify the criminalization, persecution, incarceration and systematic demonization of Muslims, but Islamophobia’s racial genealogies and modalities, and race, class and sex/gender hierarchical logics, borrow from, and interact with, a world-historical repertoire of key events, practices and racial thinking.

We seek articles that present counter-hegemonic analyses, approaches and concepts, examining Islamophobia as a longer and more complex phenomenon. We are especially interested in papers which examine how settler-colonial projects against Indigenous communities and colonized communities have informed Islamophobia formations across varying national, social and political contexts.

Ecclesiology & Ethnography Conference Postponed to Sept 2021

Ecclesiology and Ethnography Conference
Postponed to September 2021
Dear EE Friends,
It is with considerable regret that we have to announce that this year’s conference in Durham is postponed to 2021. These are strange and disturbing times but when we get through this we can look forward to meeting together again.
If you have been preparing a paper please consider offering it to our journal, Ecclesial Practices.
We look forward to gathering 21-24 September 2021.
Many good wishes,
Pete Ward, Knut Tveitereid, Jasper Bosman and Gretchen Schoon Tanis

New issue of Politics and Religion Journal is online

Vol 14 No 1 (2020) of the Politics and Religion Journal is now online. The issue is on “Religion and Politics in Contemporary Iran” and can be accessed at: https://www.politicsandreligionjournal.com/index.php/prj

https://www.politicsandreligionjournal.com/index.php/prj/article/view/401/371

THE WORD OF THE GUEST EDITOR page 14

MODERNIZATION VERSUS TRADITION IN THE STRUGGLE FOR A REPUBLIC IN 1920s IRAN – Anna Ardashnikova, Tamara Konyashkina – page 19

KHOMEINI’S POLITICAL-RELIGIOUS APPROACH OF THE ‘IRANIAN NATION’ – Bogdana Todorova – page 39

CULTURE FACTOR IN THE POLICY OF THE ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF IRAN – Marina Kameneva, Elena Paymakova – page 55

FAITH AND INFIDELITY IN THE CONTEXT OF THE NOTION SYSTEM IN THE WORKS BY MAHMUD SHABISTARI – Andrey Lukashev – page 73

TOLERANCE HERITAGE: THE ROUTE OF SUFISM FROM KHORASAN TO THE BALKANS – Morteza Nouraei, Bahman Zeinali – page 85

ANALYSIS

RELIGIOSITY AND POLITICAL TOLERANCE: REASSESSING THE RELATIONSHIP – Jonathan R. Peterson – page 105

ISLAM AND MUSLIMS IN AUSTRALIA: THE SOCIAL EXPERIENCES OF EARLY SETTLEMENT AND THE POLITICS OF CONTEMPORARY RACE RELATIONS – Fethi Mansouri – page 127

NIGERIA: THE PARADOX OF A SECULAR STATE – Ekwutosi E. Offiong, Charles E. Ekpo – page 149

AN UNSTEADY ‘WALL OF SEPARATION’: A FEW CONSIDERATIONS – L. Scott Smith – page 173

REVIEWS, CRITICAL VIEWS AND POLEMICS

“THE ARAB UPRISING AND MALAYSIA’S ISLAMIST MOVEMENTS INFLUENCE, IMPACT AND LESSONS” – Herdi Sahrasad – page 193

AASR April Newsletter

Open Access to Journal for the Academic Study of Religion

Issues of the Journal for the Academic Study of Religion in the last 12 months are now open access during the COVID-19 crisis. The most recent issue of the JASR is also available. It is a Special Issue on Religion Studies Autobiographies. Stay safe and well during these challenging times. 

Call for Papers:

Conferences

  • 3rd ANU Religion Conference – Religion and Migration: Culture and Policy. Canberra, 8-10 December 2020. Proposal deadline 30 April 2020. More info
  • ‘Politics in the Age of Disruption and Realignment’, Australian Political Studies Association (APSA) Annual Conference, 21-23 September 2020, Macquarie University, Sydney. Abstract deadline 4 May 2020. More info.

  Publications

CFP: Special Issue "Islamic and Muslim Studies in Australia"

Special Issue Information: See online CFP at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/special_issues/Australia_muslim

Dear Colleagues,

The growth of Muslim populations globally, in the Asia–Pacific region, and in Australia means Islamic and Muslim studies in Australia are increasingly important. Over the past two decades, Islamic and Muslim studies in Australia have grown along with some notable contributions to the scholarly literature, including the Melbourne University Press Islamic Studies Series. However, research on Islam and Muslims in Australia tends to receive less attention than in other Western countries. This Special Issue will contribute to filling this gap.

The aim of this Special Issue of the open-access journal Religions is to showcase some of the most important research currently being undertaken in Islamic and Muslim studies in Australia. The papers will address the challenging and often unprecedented phenomena concerning Islam and Muslim Australians that have developed particularly since the turn of the century. Scholars in the fields of Islamic and Muslim studies are invited to submit papers on Islamic religious thought and practice; Islamic groupings and organisations; migration, settlement and integration; citizenship and belonging; social cohesion and intercommunity relations; Islamophobia, radicalisation and extremism; national and community security; and other issues concerning the historic and contemporary conditions, experiences and representations of Islam and Muslims in Australia.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Halim Rane
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

New Issue of Journal of Law and Religion: Free until April 1

Silas W. Allard is happy to announce that the new issue of the Journal of Law and Religion has published. This new issue features as symposium on child law in Muslim jurisdictions, as well as review symposia on the work of John Witte and Cathleen Kaveny. The full issue can be read online for free until April 1, 2020 at https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-law-and-religion/latest-issue, and the table of contents is included below.

EDITORIAL – Silas W. Allard

Essay

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR HAREDIM IN ISRAEL – Tova Hartman, Chaim Zicherman

Research Articles

FROM LAW TO DHARMA: STATE LAW AND SACRED DUTY IN ANCIENT INDIA – Mark McClish
FAMILY, NATION BUILDING, AND CITIZENSHIP: THE LEGAL REPRESENTATION OF MUSLIM WOMEN IN THE BAN AGAINST THE BIGAMY CLAUSE OF 1951 – Rawia Aburabia

Symposium: Child Law in Muslim Jurisdictions

CHILD LAW IN MUSLIM JURISDICTIONS: THE ROLE OF THE STATE IN ESTABLISHING FILIATION (NASAB) AND PROTECTING PARENTLESS CHILDREN – Dörthe Engelcke, Nadjma Yassari
FILIATION AND ADOPTION AMONG MUSLIMS IN INDIA: THE QUAGMIRES OF A RELIGIOUS MINORITY LAW – Jean-Philippe Dequen
THE STATUS OF CHILDREN BORN OUT OF WEDLOCK AND ADOPTED CHILDREN IN INDONESIA: INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ISLAMIC, ADAT, AND HUMAN RIGHTS NORMS – Euis Nurlaelawati, Stijn Cornelis van Huis
A STEP TOO FAR? THE JOURNEY FROM “BIOLOGICAL” TO “SOCIETAL” FILIATION IN THE CHILD’S RIGHT TO NAME AND IDENTITY IN ISLAMIC AND INTERNATIONAL LAW – Shaheen Sardar Ali
ESTABLISHING FILIATION (NASAB) AND THE PLACEMENT OF DESTITUTE CHILDREN INTO NEW FAMILIES: WHAT ROLE DOES THE STATE PLAY? – Dörthe Engelcke

Book Review Symposium: On Pedagogy, Prophecy, and Public Engagement: The Recent Works of Cathleen Kaveny

PATHS AND PEDAGOGIES IN LAW AND ETHICS: ON CATHLEEN KAVENY, ETHICS AT THE EDGES OF LAW: CHRISTIAN MORALISTS AND AMERICAN LEGAL THOUGHT  – M. Christian Green
ON COVENANT, IRONY, PROVIDENCE, AND THE STANCE OF THE PROPHET: THOUGHTS IN LIGHT OF CATHLEEN KAVENY’S  – Ted A. Smith
TALKING CONTROVERSIES: WHY DIALOGUE MATTERS FOR LAW, RELIGION, AND MORALITY – A Culture of Engagement: Law, Religion, and Morality. – Jonathan Rothchild
TEACHING BALANCE, AUTONOMY, AND SOLIDARITY IN LAW: CATHLEEN KAVENY, LAW’S VIRTUESFOSTERING AUTONOMY AND SOLIDARITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY  – Kevin P. Lee

Book Review Symposium: John Witte, Jr., Church, State, and Family: Reconciling Traditional Teachings and Modern Liberties

PEDAGOGIES OF NATURAL LAW – Mark D. Jordan
FAMILY LAW ISOLATIONISM AND CHURCH, STATE, AND FAMILY  – Robin Fretwell Wilson
RELIGIOUS EDICTS, SECULAR LAW, AND THE FAMILY  – Michael J. Broyde
DEFAULT RULES AND PRIVATE ALTERATIONS – Brian H. Bix
THE ROLE OF THE STATE IN REGULATING THE MARITAL FAMILY  – Jonathan Chaplin
RESPONSE TO THE REVIEWERS – John Witte