Category Archives: Journal Announcements

AASR April Newsletter

Open Access to Journal for the Academic Study of Religion

Issues of the Journal for the Academic Study of Religion in the last 12 months are now open access during the COVID-19 crisis. The most recent issue of the JASR is also available. It is a Special Issue on Religion Studies Autobiographies. Stay safe and well during these challenging times. 

Call for Papers:

Conferences

  • 3rd ANU Religion Conference – Religion and Migration: Culture and Policy. Canberra, 8-10 December 2020. Proposal deadline 30 April 2020. More info
  • ‘Politics in the Age of Disruption and Realignment’, Australian Political Studies Association (APSA) Annual Conference, 21-23 September 2020, Macquarie University, Sydney. Abstract deadline 4 May 2020. More info.

  Publications

CFP: Special Issue "Islamic and Muslim Studies in Australia"

Special Issue Information: See online CFP at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/special_issues/Australia_muslim

Dear Colleagues,

The growth of Muslim populations globally, in the Asia–Pacific region, and in Australia means Islamic and Muslim studies in Australia are increasingly important. Over the past two decades, Islamic and Muslim studies in Australia have grown along with some notable contributions to the scholarly literature, including the Melbourne University Press Islamic Studies Series. However, research on Islam and Muslims in Australia tends to receive less attention than in other Western countries. This Special Issue will contribute to filling this gap.

The aim of this Special Issue of the open-access journal Religions is to showcase some of the most important research currently being undertaken in Islamic and Muslim studies in Australia. The papers will address the challenging and often unprecedented phenomena concerning Islam and Muslim Australians that have developed particularly since the turn of the century. Scholars in the fields of Islamic and Muslim studies are invited to submit papers on Islamic religious thought and practice; Islamic groupings and organisations; migration, settlement and integration; citizenship and belonging; social cohesion and intercommunity relations; Islamophobia, radicalisation and extremism; national and community security; and other issues concerning the historic and contemporary conditions, experiences and representations of Islam and Muslims in Australia.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Halim Rane
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

New Issue of Journal of Law and Religion: Free until April 1

Silas W. Allard is happy to announce that the new issue of the Journal of Law and Religion has published. This new issue features as symposium on child law in Muslim jurisdictions, as well as review symposia on the work of John Witte and Cathleen Kaveny. The full issue can be read online for free until April 1, 2020 at https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-law-and-religion/latest-issue, and the table of contents is included below.

EDITORIAL – Silas W. Allard

Essay

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR HAREDIM IN ISRAEL – Tova Hartman, Chaim Zicherman

Research Articles

FROM LAW TO DHARMA: STATE LAW AND SACRED DUTY IN ANCIENT INDIA – Mark McClish
FAMILY, NATION BUILDING, AND CITIZENSHIP: THE LEGAL REPRESENTATION OF MUSLIM WOMEN IN THE BAN AGAINST THE BIGAMY CLAUSE OF 1951 – Rawia Aburabia

Symposium: Child Law in Muslim Jurisdictions

CHILD LAW IN MUSLIM JURISDICTIONS: THE ROLE OF THE STATE IN ESTABLISHING FILIATION (NASAB) AND PROTECTING PARENTLESS CHILDREN – Dörthe Engelcke, Nadjma Yassari
FILIATION AND ADOPTION AMONG MUSLIMS IN INDIA: THE QUAGMIRES OF A RELIGIOUS MINORITY LAW – Jean-Philippe Dequen
THE STATUS OF CHILDREN BORN OUT OF WEDLOCK AND ADOPTED CHILDREN IN INDONESIA: INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ISLAMIC, ADAT, AND HUMAN RIGHTS NORMS – Euis Nurlaelawati, Stijn Cornelis van Huis
A STEP TOO FAR? THE JOURNEY FROM “BIOLOGICAL” TO “SOCIETAL” FILIATION IN THE CHILD’S RIGHT TO NAME AND IDENTITY IN ISLAMIC AND INTERNATIONAL LAW – Shaheen Sardar Ali
ESTABLISHING FILIATION (NASAB) AND THE PLACEMENT OF DESTITUTE CHILDREN INTO NEW FAMILIES: WHAT ROLE DOES THE STATE PLAY? – Dörthe Engelcke

Book Review Symposium: On Pedagogy, Prophecy, and Public Engagement: The Recent Works of Cathleen Kaveny

PATHS AND PEDAGOGIES IN LAW AND ETHICS: ON CATHLEEN KAVENY, ETHICS AT THE EDGES OF LAW: CHRISTIAN MORALISTS AND AMERICAN LEGAL THOUGHT  – M. Christian Green
ON COVENANT, IRONY, PROVIDENCE, AND THE STANCE OF THE PROPHET: THOUGHTS IN LIGHT OF CATHLEEN KAVENY’S  – Ted A. Smith
TALKING CONTROVERSIES: WHY DIALOGUE MATTERS FOR LAW, RELIGION, AND MORALITY – A Culture of Engagement: Law, Religion, and Morality. – Jonathan Rothchild
TEACHING BALANCE, AUTONOMY, AND SOLIDARITY IN LAW: CATHLEEN KAVENY, LAW’S VIRTUESFOSTERING AUTONOMY AND SOLIDARITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY  – Kevin P. Lee

Book Review Symposium: John Witte, Jr., Church, State, and Family: Reconciling Traditional Teachings and Modern Liberties

PEDAGOGIES OF NATURAL LAW – Mark D. Jordan
FAMILY LAW ISOLATIONISM AND CHURCH, STATE, AND FAMILY  – Robin Fretwell Wilson
RELIGIOUS EDICTS, SECULAR LAW, AND THE FAMILY  – Michael J. Broyde
DEFAULT RULES AND PRIVATE ALTERATIONS – Brian H. Bix
THE ROLE OF THE STATE IN REGULATING THE MARITAL FAMILY  – Jonathan Chaplin
RESPONSE TO THE REVIEWERS – John Witte

Call for Expressions of Interest: Journal of Sociology Editorship 2021 – 2024

Expressions of interest should be emailed to TASA Admin by  9am Monday June 1, 2020.

You can read more about the Journal of Sociology here and keep up-to-date via Twitter: @JSociology

The TASA Executive seeks to appoint a new editorial team for the Journal of Sociology for the four-year term 2021–2024.

Journal of Sociology features high quality sociological scholarship in all its forms. We are dedicated to showcasing theory as well as applied sociology, quantitative and qualitative research. Interdisciplinary pieces are welcome, as are submissions from outside the academy. Based in the Southern Hemisphere and committed to intellectual works from the Asia-Pacific region, including Indigenous scholarship, we also encourage submissions from across the globe. 

The term of the current editors expires at the end of this year, although copy for the first issue of 2021 will be organised. The journal receives financial and administrative assistance from TASA and from the publisher, Sage. Manuscript submission is done on-line through ScholarOne.

All members of the editorial team (Editors-in-Chief and Associate Editors) must be TASA members and ideally will be located within a department of sociology or a School/unit that offers a major sequence of sociology, including doctoral studies. The Executive are willing to consider applications from an editorial team at a single university or a consortia of staff at two or more universities. Such consortia will be required to demonstrate that they have the capability to work effectively across locations. TASA will provide the Managing Editor with a complimentary TASA membership.

Applicants are also required to show that they have institutional support for the management of the journal, and to specify the nature of this support. Selection protocols and application instructions are available here.

Further information is available from the TASA President, Associate Professor Dan Woodman or from the current Editors in Chief, Associate Professor Kate Huppatz and Associate Professor Steve Matthewman.

Call for Papers: International Journal of Religion (IJOR)

Deadline for papers, of between 4,000-5,000 words, is 31 July 2020.

Jeffrey Haynes, Eric Trinka and Tuomas Martikainen have founded a journal regarding the role of religion in global politics.

International Journal of Religion (IJOR) is a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journal aiming to offer a venue for scholarly discussion on religion in reference to the social sciences and humanities. International Journal of Religion aims to fulfil the need for critical discussion on how religion affects economics, society, politics, international relations, geography, anthropology, education, business and management, health, and the arts. International Journal of Religion invites articles with rigorous analysis, reflecting theoretical insights or persuasive empirical evidence. The journal aims to bring into mutually beneficial dialogue, all those – including, policy makers, practitioners, educators, scholars, researchers, and students – interested in these crucial, controversial and topical conversations. The overall objective is to inform understanding of how religion impacts on many areas of human interaction. 

 Editorial Board

  • Nassef Manabilang Adiong, University of the Philippines, Philippines
  • Samim Akgonul, University of Strasbourg, France
  • Deina Abdelkader, University of Massachusetts Lowell, USA
  • Tuncay Bilecen, Regent’s University London, UK
  • Benjamin Bruce, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Mexico
  • Jocelyne Cesari, University of Birmingham, UK
  • Sabine Dreher, York University, Canada
  • Jonathan Fox, Bar Ilan University, Israel
  • Mehmet Gurses, Florida Atlantic University, USA
  • Erhan Kurtarir, Yildiz Technical University, Turkey
  • Tuomas Martikainen, Migration Institute of Finland, Finland
  • Raffaele Mauriello, Allameh Tabataba’i University, Iran 
  • Paulette K. Schuster, AMILAT, Israel
  • Chris Shannahan, Coventry University, UK
  • Hakan Yavuz, The University of Utah, USA

International Advisory Board:

  • Muqarrab Akbar, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Pakistan
  • Sariya Cheruvalil-Contractor, Coventry University, UK
  • Austin Cheyeka, University of Zambia, Zambia
  • Katarzyna Dośpiał-Borysiak, Uniwersytet Łódzki, Poland
  • Toyin Falola, University of Texas at Austin, USA
  • Petr Kratochvil, Institute of International Relations, Czech Republic
  • Vendulka Kubolkova, Miami University, USA
  • Sabrina Ramet, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
  • John Rees, University of Notre Dame Australia
  • Pedro dos Santos, College of Saint Benedict, Saint John’s University, USA
  • Christine Schliesser, Zurich University, Switzerland
  • Ibrahim Sirkeci Regent’s University London, UK
  • Ignatius Swart, University of the Western Cape, South Africa
  • La Toya Waha, Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, Singapore

Call for papers: ‘The politics of religious dissent’

The first issue of International Journal of Religion is a special issue. It seeks to compare and contrast differing religious perspectives on the topic of politics and religious dissent. Its focus is on: key tenets of belief of a particular religious faith; examples of dissent from core beliefs; the elasticity of religious traditions; consequences of dissent; diversity within religious faiths; how religions manage or fail to manage dissent; ethical treatment of dissent in religious traditions; and whether religious faiths prescribe clear ways to manage dissent.

Three questions frame the topic in the special issue:

  • How do religious leaders respond to dissent within their faiths?
  • How does the state respond to religious dissent?
  • How do religions react to dissent from feminist and gay activists?

Examples may be drawn from the following: Judaism focuses more on belonging than believing and may consequently be relatively open to pluralism and tolerant of diversity. Christianity has a long history of violence in the context of dissent, suggesting a relatively high degree of intolerance. Nevertheless, Christianity developed into a relatively diverse religion, the default faith of Western modernity, linked to individuals’ right to be free, including their choice of faith. Islam is more heterogeneous, divided and intolerant of dissent, a situation aggravated by the consequences of colonialism. Hinduism developed via diverse traditions which existed long before ‘construction’ of Hinduism during colonialism, with the result that Hinduism is often thought of as both a tolerant and accommodative religious tradition. Sikhism is strongly linked to maintenance of identity, focused on both rigid boundaries and exclusiveness, a process linked to politics and power. Confucianism is a contested term used to describe a wide variety of rituals and convictions, sometimes adopted by those in power to justify national unity and stability via a ‘Confucian’ culture, sometimes employed by the powerful to stifle dissent. Buddhism is often said to both tolerant and able to adapt to an environment where it is practised, yet the faith also may exhibit intolerance in relation to expressions of dissent.

Interdisciplinary perspectives are welcome, as are those from political science, international relations, sociology, philosophy, history, and ethical and religious studies.

For details please contact with Jeffrey Haynes; tsjhayn1@londonmet.ac.uk or A. Erdi Ozturk e.ozturk@londonmet.ac.uk 

New Journal Issue: Sociology of Islam Volume 8 (2020): Issue 1 (Feb 2020)

This issue will be comparative in scope on several dimensions: From regional identities to perception of Islam in a non-Muslim populated country; from religiosity and alcohol consumption to Islamic State;  from radical secularism to Islamic Nationalism and democracy in Turkey.  Contributions from a variety of disciplines that focus on assessing and explaining the role of Islam in diverse societies and countries.

Our next issue will be a special issue on “Science and Scientific Production in the Middle East” edited by Professor Eyman Shabana from Georgetown University.  

We will have another special issue soon: “Halal Economies in Non-Muslim Secular Countries” edited by Rano Turaeva and Michael Brose from Indiana University-Bloomington.

Please submit your article or proposal for a special issue: https://brill.com/view/journals/soi/soi-overview.xml  

Best to all, Tugrul

Sociology of Islam  Volume 8 (2020): Issue 1 (Feb 2020)

https://brill.com/view/journals/soi/8/1/soi.8.issue-1.xml

The Arabs and Iranians What Went Wrong? And Why?

By: Mahjoob Zweiri and Ismail Zahirovic

Pages: 1–16

Before isis: What Early America Thought of Islam

By: Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet

Pages: 17–52

Religiosity, Social Influence, and Drinking Among Iranians

By: Bashir Tofangsazi

Pages: 53–79

The Problem of the Islamic State

By: Milad Dokhanchi

Pages: 80–109

From Radical Secularism to Islamic NationalismThe Historical Evolution of Politico-Religious Relationship in Turkey

By: Yang Chen

Pages: 110–126

Erdogan’s Train to Authoritarianism

By: Michael M. Gunter

Pages: 127–149

Call for Papers: Special issue of the journal ‘Religions’ on Islamic and Muslim Studies in Australia

Link to Special Issue Site

The aim of this Special Issue is to showcase some of the most important research currently being undertaken in Islamic and Muslim studies in Australia. The papers will address the challenging and often unprecedented phenomena concerning Islam and Muslim Australians that have developed particularly since the turn of the century. Scholars in the fields of Islamic and Muslim studies are invited to submit papers on Islamic religious thought and practice; Islamic groupings and organisations; migration, settlement and integration; citizenship and belonging; social cohesion and intercommunity relations; Islamophobia, radicalisation and extremism; national and community security; and other issues concerning the historic and contemporary conditions, experiences and representations of Islam and Muslims in Australia.

Call for Papers: Journal of Religion and Demography

In 2019, the Journal of Religion and Demography published papers on:

Are you sitting on a treasure trove of quantitative analysis of religion? We want to hear about it! Submissions are open for the next issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of Religion and Demography.

Sociology of Islam Journal – Volume 7 (2019): Issue 4 (Dec 2019)

Special Issue: Unfinished Conversations with Saba Mahmood edited by Sultan Doughan and Jean-Michel Landry – https://brill.com/view/journals/soi/7/4/soi.7.issue-4.xml

Unfinished Conversations with Saba Mahmood – To Charles Hirschkind in Deep Gratitude

By: Sultan Doughan and Jean-Michel Landry

Pages: 215–225

The Constraints of Choice: Secular Sensibilities, Pious Critique, and an Islamic Ethic of Sisterhood in France

By: Kirsten Wesselhoeft

Pages: 226–244

The Politics of the Veil in Medieval Christianity

Saba Mahmood and the Practice of Feminist Historiography

By: Karl Shuve

Pages: 245–262

Distinguishing Companions: Mixed-Confession Education, Assimilation, and Islamic Thought

By: Timothy Gutmann

Pages: 263–288

Piety, Practice and Habitus: Saba Mahmood’s Dialogue with Aristotle and His Legacy

By: Bryan S. Turner

Pages: 289–300

Liberal Political Philosophy of Religious Difference after Saba Mahmood

By: Christoph Baumgartner

Pages: 301–322

Secular Governance and Islamic Law

The Globalization of the Minority Question

By: Alexandre Caeiro

Pages: 323–343

On the Study of Islam and the Middle East after Saba Mahmood

A Roundtable Conversation with Lisa Wedeen and Schirin Amir-Moazami

Pages: 345–360

Contents

Pages: 361–363

Publication Date: 13 Dec 2019

Religions Special Issue

Special issue on: Cross-cultural approaches to studying the intersections of religiosity, spirituality, and moral values with generous orientations, philanthropic participation, and civic engagement.

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript for consideration in this Special Issue, please email the guest editor by January 15, 2020 with a title and abstract (email: psherzog@iupui.edu, subject: Religions abstract). 

Full papers are due by April 15, 2020.

This Special Issue aims to advance cross-cultural approaches to studying the intersections of religiosity, spirituality, and moral values with generous orientations, philanthropic participation, and civic engagement. The purpose is to better understand whether and how religious engagement contributes to acting generously across cultural contexts. In particular, the issue will focus on these understudied world regions: Asia (especially East, Southeast, and South Asia), the Middle East and Turkey, Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Pacific Islands. The science and imagination of generosity and religiosity are flourishing. Yet, the field lacks valuable integration of these topics, and global studies with cross-cultural comparisons need further advancement. Scholars continue to refine theories and methods for studying each topic individually, but these are under-tested across cultures, and their intersections are understudied.

For example, the Religious Schema Scale was constructed by Streib, Hood, and Klein (2010) but as yet has only been tested in the United States and Germany. Another example of a well-developed set of measures is based upon attachment to God theory, as constructed and investigated by Manglos-Weber, Mooney, Bollen, and Roos (2016). However, thus far, these measures have only been tested in the United States. Alternatively, the Centrality of Religion Scale was developed by Huber and Huber (2012) and has been tested in 25 countries, translated into 20 languages, and studied with more than 100,000 participants. However, this scale has not yet been studied along with measures of generosity and philanthropic participation. With regard to moral values, the World Values Survey is one of the most well-known social scientific surveys for studying values across the globe and collects data from almost 100 countries containing 90 percent of the world’s population. However, the WVS has its critics (e.g., Abramson 2011; Lundgren 2015), most notably concerns that the questionnaires were developed in Western societies and then translated to include other nations (Kotzé and Lombard 2003; Inglehart 2008; Taonui 2016).

Similarly, numerous studies measure the rates of philanthropic participation globally. For example, the Hudson Institute’s Center for Global Prosperity (2006) developed a set of Global Philanthropy Indices to compare philanthropic activities across 79 countries, employing a standard instrument that was developed with the input of several country-based experts. However, these indices focus on macro-level national contexts rather than cultural values and norms and also do not include measures of religiosity. Moreover, the Science of Generosity Initiative supported projects that collected data on generosity in at least 27 countries, including the United States, India, Israel, Japan, the Honduras, Tanzania, Turkey, Canada, England, Wales, France, Spain, Italy, Ireland, and many other countries in Europe, which resulted in at least 45 peer-reviewed publications spanning the disciplines of sociology, psychology, economics, political science, psychiatry, international relations, medicine, neuroscience, anthropology, biobehavioral health, business, education, family consumer and human development, history, public administration, public affairs, public policy, religion, and social work. However, the world regions identified for this Special Issue remain understudied.

This Special Issue invites articles that address the topics of religiosity, spirituality, moral values, generosity, philanthropy, or civic engagement, including life course development. We are particularly interested in literature reviews, concept papers, and empirical investigations that pursue the intersection of these topics, as well as those that focus on cross-cultural studies of these world regions: Asia (East, Southeast, and South Asia), the Middle East and Turkey, Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, or the Pacific Islands.

Dr. Patricia Snell Herzog
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

·       Generosity

·       Philanthropy

·       Religiosity

·       Spirituality

·       Moral values

·       Youth and emerging adults

·       Cross-cultural studies