Category Archives: Journal Announcements

Sociology of Islam Journal – Volume 7 (2019): Issue 4 (Dec 2019)

Special Issue: Unfinished Conversations with Saba Mahmood edited by Sultan Doughan and Jean-Michel Landry – https://brill.com/view/journals/soi/7/4/soi.7.issue-4.xml

Unfinished Conversations with Saba Mahmood – To Charles Hirschkind in Deep Gratitude

By: Sultan Doughan and Jean-Michel Landry

Pages: 215–225

The Constraints of Choice: Secular Sensibilities, Pious Critique, and an Islamic Ethic of Sisterhood in France

By: Kirsten Wesselhoeft

Pages: 226–244

The Politics of the Veil in Medieval Christianity

Saba Mahmood and the Practice of Feminist Historiography

By: Karl Shuve

Pages: 245–262

Distinguishing Companions: Mixed-Confession Education, Assimilation, and Islamic Thought

By: Timothy Gutmann

Pages: 263–288

Piety, Practice and Habitus: Saba Mahmood’s Dialogue with Aristotle and His Legacy

By: Bryan S. Turner

Pages: 289–300

Liberal Political Philosophy of Religious Difference after Saba Mahmood

By: Christoph Baumgartner

Pages: 301–322

Secular Governance and Islamic Law

The Globalization of the Minority Question

By: Alexandre Caeiro

Pages: 323–343

On the Study of Islam and the Middle East after Saba Mahmood

A Roundtable Conversation with Lisa Wedeen and Schirin Amir-Moazami

Pages: 345–360

Contents

Pages: 361–363

Publication Date: 13 Dec 2019

Religions Special Issue

Special issue on: Cross-cultural approaches to studying the intersections of religiosity, spirituality, and moral values with generous orientations, philanthropic participation, and civic engagement.

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript for consideration in this Special Issue, please email the guest editor by January 15, 2020 with a title and abstract (email: psherzog@iupui.edu, subject: Religions abstract). 

Full papers are due by April 15, 2020.

This Special Issue aims to advance cross-cultural approaches to studying the intersections of religiosity, spirituality, and moral values with generous orientations, philanthropic participation, and civic engagement. The purpose is to better understand whether and how religious engagement contributes to acting generously across cultural contexts. In particular, the issue will focus on these understudied world regions: Asia (especially East, Southeast, and South Asia), the Middle East and Turkey, Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Pacific Islands. The science and imagination of generosity and religiosity are flourishing. Yet, the field lacks valuable integration of these topics, and global studies with cross-cultural comparisons need further advancement. Scholars continue to refine theories and methods for studying each topic individually, but these are under-tested across cultures, and their intersections are understudied.

For example, the Religious Schema Scale was constructed by Streib, Hood, and Klein (2010) but as yet has only been tested in the United States and Germany. Another example of a well-developed set of measures is based upon attachment to God theory, as constructed and investigated by Manglos-Weber, Mooney, Bollen, and Roos (2016). However, thus far, these measures have only been tested in the United States. Alternatively, the Centrality of Religion Scale was developed by Huber and Huber (2012) and has been tested in 25 countries, translated into 20 languages, and studied with more than 100,000 participants. However, this scale has not yet been studied along with measures of generosity and philanthropic participation. With regard to moral values, the World Values Survey is one of the most well-known social scientific surveys for studying values across the globe and collects data from almost 100 countries containing 90 percent of the world’s population. However, the WVS has its critics (e.g., Abramson 2011; Lundgren 2015), most notably concerns that the questionnaires were developed in Western societies and then translated to include other nations (Kotzé and Lombard 2003; Inglehart 2008; Taonui 2016).

Similarly, numerous studies measure the rates of philanthropic participation globally. For example, the Hudson Institute’s Center for Global Prosperity (2006) developed a set of Global Philanthropy Indices to compare philanthropic activities across 79 countries, employing a standard instrument that was developed with the input of several country-based experts. However, these indices focus on macro-level national contexts rather than cultural values and norms and also do not include measures of religiosity. Moreover, the Science of Generosity Initiative supported projects that collected data on generosity in at least 27 countries, including the United States, India, Israel, Japan, the Honduras, Tanzania, Turkey, Canada, England, Wales, France, Spain, Italy, Ireland, and many other countries in Europe, which resulted in at least 45 peer-reviewed publications spanning the disciplines of sociology, psychology, economics, political science, psychiatry, international relations, medicine, neuroscience, anthropology, biobehavioral health, business, education, family consumer and human development, history, public administration, public affairs, public policy, religion, and social work. However, the world regions identified for this Special Issue remain understudied.

This Special Issue invites articles that address the topics of religiosity, spirituality, moral values, generosity, philanthropy, or civic engagement, including life course development. We are particularly interested in literature reviews, concept papers, and empirical investigations that pursue the intersection of these topics, as well as those that focus on cross-cultural studies of these world regions: Asia (East, Southeast, and South Asia), the Middle East and Turkey, Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, or the Pacific Islands.

Dr. Patricia Snell Herzog
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

·       Generosity

·       Philanthropy

·       Religiosity

·       Spirituality

·       Moral values

·       Youth and emerging adults

·       Cross-cultural studies

Call For Papers: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion (RSSSR)

Professor Ralph Hood and Sariya Cheruvallil-Contractor welcome your proposals for the Journal Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion (RSSSR)

Deadline for abstracts: 5pm on Monday 13th January 2020

For more information, please visit brill.com/rssr

Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion (RSSSR) is an interdisciplinary, international peer-viewed annual series, which publishes new and innovative research within the social scientific study of religion or belief. Contributions span a range of theoretical orientations, geographic contexts and research methods, though most articles are reports of original quantitative or qualitative research related mainly to the sociology and/or psychology of religion.

RSSR usually includes a guest-edited special section that allows networks of researchers to report studies in areas that are or current interest or which are innovative and expanding the discipline into new areas. For 2020, RSSR will include a special section on Feminist Approaches to the Sociology of Religion. This section will include chapter about research that utilises feminist epistemological frameworks to study lived experiences of religion or belief. For this issue we define feminist approaches broadly as those that

·         use a gendered lens

·         privilege lesser-heard voices including women

·         reflect on researcher positionality

·         seek societal transformation as an integral aspect of research.

Submitting Proposals: We invite proposals for the next edition of the RSSR. We welcome proposals from academics at all levels of their career, including early career researchers and final year PhD students. Please submit a title and abstract of no more than 300 words together with names and short biographies (150 words), institutional affiliation/s (if relevant), and contact details.

·         Deadline for abstracts: 5pm on Monday 13th January 2020

·         Notification of acceptance of paper: 30th January 2020

·         If accepted full papers will be due by 5pm Friday 31st April 2020

Manuscripts for both the main and special sections should be send to the editors, Ralph Hood (ralph-hood@utc.edu) & Sariya Cheruvallil-Contractor (ac0967@coventry.ac.uk).

For more information and submission guidelines please visit the Instructions for Authors document on brill.com/rssr, or contact the editor.

Letter from Editors of Global Dialogue

Brigitte Aulenbacher and Klaus Dörre

December 16, 2019

Volume 9, Issue 3 of Global Dialogue (GD9.3) is out now, opening with a discussion of perspectives on and activities against climate change and the ecological crisis. Qingzhi Huan, a proponent of eco-socialist policies, gives insights into the Chinese debates showing how environmental policies and approaches to environmental protection have changed over the past decades. As ‘Fridays for Future’ has become a very remarkable social movement against climate change Global Dialogue invited Julia Kaiser and Jasper Stange to map the cross-class approach to mobilizing and coalition-building that is a new development within the environmental movement.

Our first symposium, organized by Global Dialogue and the International Karl Polanyi Society celebrates the 75th anniversary of Polanyi’s masterpiece The Great Transformation, which has inspired a lot of research. Experts from different strands of research read his economic, cultural, and social history of capitalism for our times.

In our second symposium about migration Karin Scherschel presents a collection of pieces from different countries combining historical perspectives on migration with an analysis of its causes, the situation of migrants and in particular refugees, the contested political regulation, and civil society’s engagement.

Finally, Moustapha Tamba organized for this new issue a collection of articles from Senegalese sociologists, who focus on the sociology of education and give us deep insights into the organization and accessibility of education and the different types of schools and their regulation.

GLOBAL DIALOGUE Volume 9 Issue 3

GD, Volume 9, Issue 3 (December 2019)
 can be found in the following languages, with more arriving soon.

ENGLISH | FRENCH | SPANISH | CHINESE (TRADITIONAL) | CHINESE (SIMPLIFIED) | FARSI | HINDI | PORTUGUESE | ARABIC | JAPANESE | RUSSIAN | POLISH | TURKISH | ROMANIAN | KAZAKH | INDONESIAN | BENGALI |

CFP: Journal: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion

Dear Friends and Colleagues,
Professor Ralph Hood and I, welcome your proposals for the Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion (RSSSR). The ‘Call for Papers’ is appended below. We both look forward to your responses
Many thanks
Sariya
*****     *****     ******    *****     *****     ******
Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion
Edited by Ralph Hood & Sariya Cheruvallil-Contractor
For more information, please visit brill.com/rssr
ISSN 1046-8064
Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion (RSSSR) is an interdisciplinary, international peer-viewed annual series, which publishes new and innovative research within the social scientific study of religion or belief. Contributions span a range of theoretical orientations, geographic contexts and research methods, though most articles are reports of original quantitative or qualitative research related mainly to the sociology and/or psychology of religion.
RSSR usually includes a guest-edited special section that allows networks of researchers to report studies in areas that are or current interest or which are innovative and expanding the discipline into new areas. For 2020, RSSR will include a special section on Feminist Approaches to the Sociology of Religion. This section will include chapter about research that utilises feminist epistemological frameworks to study lived experiences of religion or belief. For this issue we define feminist approaches broadly as those that
         use a gendered lens
         privilege lesser-heard voices including women
         reflect on researcher positionality
         seek societal transformation as an integral aspect of research.
Submitting Proposals: We invite proposals for the next edition of the RSSR. We welcome proposals from academics at all levels of their career, including early career researchers and final year PhD students. Please submit a title and abstract of no more than 300 words together with names and short biographies (150 words), institutional affiliation/s (if relevant), and contact details.
         Deadline for abstracts: 5pm on Monday 13th January 2020
         Notification of acceptance of paper: 30th January 2020
*         If accepted full papers will be due by 5pm Friday 31st April 2020
Manuscripts for both the main and special sections should be send to the editors, Ralph Hood (ralph-hood@utc.edu<mailto:ralph-hood@utc.edu>) & Sariya Cheruvallil-Contractor (ac0967@coventry.ac.uk<mailto:ac0967@coventry.ac.uk>). For more information and submission guidelines please visit the Instructions for Authors document on brill.com/rssr, or contact the editor.
*****     *****     ******    *****     *****     ******
Dr Sariya Cheruvallil-Contractor
Assistant Professor | Research Group Lead | Faith and Peaceful Relations
Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, Coventry University

Vol. 30/2 of the journal Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies

We are happy to announce the publication of Vol. 30/2 of the journal Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies. The issue includes articles and reviews by prominent Nordic researchers Malin Thor Tureby, Simo Muir, Johan Fischer, Göran Rosenberg and Karin Kvist Geverts.

You find the journal at https://journal.fi/nj/issue/current

Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies aims at promoting Jewish studies in Scandinavia by publishing scholarly articles, surveys and documents, essays and conversations as well as by reviewing recent literature. The contributions are published in one of the Scandinavian languages, or in English, German or French, with an abstract in English. The journal is strictly academic and does not pursue any special religious, political or cultural policy.

NJ is published open access online.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

Karin Hedner Zetterholm & Ruth Illman

Editors of Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies

Calls for Manuscripts for Special Issue on Religion, Gender and Violence

Religion and Gender Journal

The journal Religion and Gender invites article proposals for a special issue on Religion, Gender and Violence. The relationship between religion and violence is highly contested and has come under considerable scrutiny by scholars of religion.  Less understood is the relationship between gender, religion and violence and this special issue aims to contribute to understandings of the ways in which religion intersects with institutional, familial and public gendered violence as explored through current research via an interdisciplinary lens.
With the current roll out of public inquiries into institutional child sexual abuse across Ireland, England and Wales, Scotland, Europe, the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, it is clear that at a global level, it is religious organizations that have had the most widespread and highest levels of abuse against children with characteristically poor institutional responses to victims and their families. Public inquires have clearly established that religious organizations made strategic decisions to limit reputational damage at the cost of child safety and the implications of this for religious institutions is yet to be fully understood.

Violence against women and children in domestic settings where religion is a significant factor has also been the subject of ongoing and recent research indicating that there are specific issues at play for women and children in experiencing and reporting abuse and how it is managed by faith traditions. In important public debates on the status of gender diversity and difference, for example the marriage equality issue, there have been forceful responses to vulnerable cohorts from religious leaders, in social media and religious publications.
At the same time, there has been an important counter discourse articulated by religious groups around building religious and social capital that contributes to a pluralist understanding of the value of multi-religious societies and gender diversity. These discourses, most often articulated by more liberal religious groups but also increasingly by mainstream faith traditions, utilize the language of social justice and theological interpretation to construct narratives of gender inclusion and equity. This brings faith traditions into conflict within themselves over the framing of gender relations for the new century.

For this special issue, we invite manuscripts that address this convergence from a variety of perspectives on the function and meaning of gender, religion and violence and its counter-discourses.

The editors are particularly interested in receiving manuscripts that showcase empirical research that address, but are not limited to, the following areas and/or questions:

  • What role does gendered violence play in mainstream religious groups re maintenance of the faith tradition?
  • How are the impacts and experiences of gendered violence managed by religious organisations with regard to pastoral care and processes of remediation?
  • Who are the victims of gendered violence in religious organisations?
  • In what ways can feminist theory and theology contribute to and expand understandings of religion, gender and violence?
  • What role does non-religion and/or secularity play in relation to responding to and managing the disclosure of violence in religious organisations.
  • How well do public inquiries address gendered religious violence and what are the impacts on religious organisations with respect to particular case studies?

Submissions should be between 5000 and 8000 words in length (including abstract, footnotes and references). See Brill’s page for further information on submitting an article https://brill.com/view/journals/rag/rag-overview.xml .

Affiliation and email address should be supplied in the first submission. In order to guarantee a blind review process, all submissions should be anonymized with the name of and references to the author removed from the text. We are happy to receive inquiries about prospective submissions.

Please send all queries to the special issues editors:

SUBMISSION DATES
15 January 2020: Abstract Submission
15 August 2020: Full manuscript submission

Journal for the Academic Study of Religion 32 (1)

The latest Journal for the Academic Study of Religion 32(1) has been published. It includes research articles by the following authors:

For book reviews, click here.

Appel à contribution – « Repenser le martyre par le biais des femmes »

Cher(e)s Collègues,

Vous trouverez ci-dessous un appel à contribution pour un numéro thématique de la revue Religiologiques.  S’il vous plait, auriez-vous l’amabilité d’acheminer cet Appel à contribution aux personnes et vos réseaux susceptibles d’être intéressés.  En vous remerciant de votre généreuse assistance.

Avec nos sentiments les plus cordiaux
Roxanne D. Marcotte
Université du Québec à Montréal, UQAM
(pour la rédaction de Religiologiques)

**********************************************************

AAArelititre

    APPEL À CONTRIBUTION : NUMÉRO THÉMATIQUE

     « Repenser le martyre par le biais des femmes »

Le « martyre » désigne à la fois l’acte de mise à mort pour motifs religieux ou politiques, ainsi que le récit de ce drame. L’objectif de ce numéro thématique est de (re)penser le martyre par le biais de « figures de femmes », ces « martyres » qui résistent et s’opposent jusqu’à la mort – ultime témoignage de leurs convictions religieuses (mourir pour sa foi) ou politiques (mourir pour une idéologie, une cause, sa patrie, etc.).

Il conviendra, dans un premier temps, d’interroger la notion même de « martyre », cette mort qui se montre publiquement et qui incarne une contestation de légitimité religieuse ou politique.  Puis, dans un deuxième temps, il sera opportun d’étudier des cas particuliers de martyre de femmes qui, de tout temps (de l’antiquité jusqu’à aujourd’hui) et qu’elles soient d’ici ou d’ailleurs, ont contesté et « témoigné » par l’ultime sacrifice de leurs vies.

Au cœur de la problématique entourant les figures de femmes martyres résident les questions du genre (Butler), de sa construction et des dynamiques de rapports de genre (Bourdieu ; Woodhead ; Grosjean). S’attarder à ces questions et ces dynamiques permettra de proposer de nouvelles pistes de réflexion pour mieux saisir le phénomène du martyre des femmes, et contribuer ainsi à la production de nouvelles interprétations, analyses et théories. Trois pistes d’exploration seront privilégiées :

I – Les femmes martyres de l’Antiquité et du Moyen-Âge (du deuxième siècle avant notre ère à la Renaissance), que celles-ci appartiennent aux traditions juives (Haber ; Lemelin), chrétiennes (Amat ; Cardman ; Salisbury) ou musulmanes (Aghaie), et que les représentations de ces femmes martyres (Joslyn-Siemiatkoski ; Tolonen) soient issues des textes hagiographiques de la martyrologie (Destephen) ou de l’histoire de la réception de ces représentations (Baslez ; Doran ; Sei). Comment les martyres de jadis peuvent-elles nous aider à penser les femmes martyres d’aujourd’hui, voire à penser ce qui advient au phénomène même du martyre ?

II – Femmes martyres de la modernité, que celles-ci s’inscrivent dans une trajectoire mortifère religieuse ou politique, quelles que soient la nature de leurs motivations – femmes kamikazes des Tigres Tamouls du Sri Lanka, séparatistes kurdes du PKK en Turquie (Grosjean), kamikazes du Caucase (Larzillière ; Campana) et du Proche-Orient (Blom ; Straub ; Sela-Shayoritz ; Vuillemenot), les djihadistes de Daesh (Khosrokhavar et Benslama), etc.–, et quel que soit le genre de culte qui leur est voué. En quoi ces femmes se ressemblent-elles et se différencient-elles des martyres d’autrefois ? Que nous apprennent les études scientifiques qui leur sont dédiées ou encore les représentations qui en sont proposées par les médias traditionnels ou numériques ?

III – Représentations des femmes martyres dans la culture : que celles-ci aient été le sujet d’œuvres littéraires, d’arts visuels ou de musique, de jadis ou d’aujourd’hui. Comment ces femmes martyres (saintes, shahidat, kamikazes, bouddhistes tibétaines immolées, figures de luttes nationales, etc.) sont-elles (re)présentées ?

Les contributions pallieront l’invisibilité de ces femmes martyres (vies, représentations, discours, analyses, théories, etc.) en les (ré)inscrivant dans l’histoire. Ceci pourra s’entreprendre à partir d’un regard disciplinaire (sociologie ; anthropologie ; psychanalyse ; psychologie ; religiologie, etc.) ou interdisciplinaire, ou à partir de différentes approches (diachroniques, synchroniques ou comparatives) – qu’elles s’appliquent aux objets, aux périodes, aux traditions ou aux médiums – pour explorer l’intersection de la notion de martyre avec celles du genre et du sacré.

Longueur des articles

Les articles doivent être de 6 000 à 8 000 mots, en format WORD (.doc) et conformes aux « Consignes de présentation » qui sont disponibles sous l’onglet « Soumission d’articles » du site Web de Religiologiques(https://www.religiologiques.uqam.ca).

Soumission des articles

Les textes sont soumis à l’adresse courriel suivante religiologiques@uqam.ca.

Échéances

Les manuscrits sont à soumettre avant la fin du mois de décembre 2019. Avant de soumettre un texte pour évaluation, il est possible d’acheminer une proposition d’article (de 300 à 400 mots) à la direction du numéro thématique.

Pour de plus amples informations, veuillez contacter

Isabelle Lemelin (PhD, UQAM), la direction du numéro thématique

Département de sciences des religions, Université du Québec à Montréal

Courriel : isabellelemelin@gmail.com


INFORMATION sur la revue RELIGIOLOGIQUES

RELIGIOLOGIQUES est une revue de sciences humaines qui s’intéresse aux multiples manifestations du sacré dans la culture ainsi qu’au phénomène religieux sous toutes ses formes. Elle s’intéresse également au domaine de l’éthique. Les articles qu’elle publie font l’objet d’une évaluation des comités de lecture spécialisés (à double insu ; habituellement sollicitation de trois expertises) et indépendants de son comité de rédaction.RELIGIOLOGIQUESest la revue phare de la recherche francophone en sciences des religions en Amérique du Nord publiée de 1990 à 2005 (31 numéros, la majorité des articles étant disponible dans leur intégralité en ligne sur le site de la revue : https://www.religiologiques.uqam.ca) et qui a repris, depuis 2015, sa tradition de publication de numéros thématiques (qui peuvent être proposés), d’articles hors thèmes (acceptés en tout temps) et de numéros varia.

RELIGIOLOGIQUES : Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Département de sciences des religions, Courriel: religiologiques@uqam.ca

“Scandinavian Jewish Studies” journal is now Open Access online

Dear Colleagues, kära kolleger
Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies has completed the digitalisation of its archive! Welcome to read every article published in the peer-review journal since the start in 1975, full text, open access.

Digtaliseringen av Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies är nu klar, alla artiklar publicerade sedan starten år 1975 finns nu att läsa i fulltext, open access!

https://journal.fi/nj/issue/archive

Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies aims at promoting Jewish studies in Scandinavia by publishing scholarly articles, surveys and documents, by reviewing recent literature, and compiling bibliographies. The contributions are published in one of the Scandinavian languages, or in English, German or French, with an abstract in English. The journal is strictly academic and does not pursue any special religious, political or cultural policy.
NJ is published open access online.

Kind regards,
Ruth Illman & Karin Hedner Zetterholm, Editors