Category Archives: Professional Development

Postdoc in the Sociology of Religion

Happy New Year dear SocRel colleagues!

I would like to draw your attention to a 2-year post doc open at the University of Helsinki, with a focus on sociology of religion (religion in Europe, religion and migration, stats skills preferred, but all considered).

https://www.helsinki.fi/fi/avoimet-tyopaikat/postdoctoral-researcher

Please share!

Best,
Dr Titus Hjelm
Associate Professor in the Study of Religion
Department of Cultures
University of Helsinki

Theological Action Research Training Day

Event Information

TARN

Date of Event

6th January 2021
Last Booking Date for this Event

4th January 2021
Description

The training is designed to equip participants with the knowledge and skills to embark on your own theological action research project. 

The day is run by Dr Helen Cameron, Research Associate of the Centre for Baptist Studies at Regent’s Park College, Oxford and Dr James Butler, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Roehampton and MA lecturer at the Church Mission Society, Oxford.

The day runs from 2.30pm to 8.30pm (UK time).  It will be interactive and conversational and take place over Zoom.

  • Early Bird Fees (now until 30/11/2020):  Waged Researcher £45;  Doctoral student £30.     
  • Standard fee (1/12/2020 – 4/1/2021): Waged Researcher £50; Doctoral student £35.

https://estore.roehampton.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/conferences/tarn-2021/theological-action-research-training-day-6-january

ISA Publications Committee looking for a Social Media Manager

The International Sociological Association’s Publications Committee is looking for a Social Media Manager. We have really little time to fill the position and deadline is approaching soon (Dec 18th)

I kindly request you disseminate the CFA among your contacts and potential candidates

https://www.isa-sociology.org/uploads/imgen/866-isa-social-media-manager.pdf

ECR (including PhD students) and colleagues from under-represented regions are particularly welcome. If you could identify someone who has the experience and the stamina to join the team, please encourage them to apply.

I will be glad to answer any queries the potential candidates may have. Please ask them to contact me directly at eloisamartin@hotmail.com .

Thanks a lot!
Stay safe and healthy!

Dr. Eloísa Martín
Associate Professor, United Arab Emirates University
Associate Professor, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (on leave)
Vice-President for Publications, International Sociological Association (ISA)
Chair, ISA Human Rights Committee

ASA RELIGION SECTION PARTNERS TO CREATE A NEW GRADUATE STUDENT MENTORING COMMUNITY

The ASA Religion Section is teaming up with The Aggie Research Program (ARP) at Texas A&M University to create a research mentoring community. Through a series of three online workshops hosted by the ARP, participants will:

  • form a research-intensive community of their peers,
  • facilitate the creation of team-based research projects using their own research agenda,
  • recruit 3-5 undergraduate researchers,
  • learn mentoring and leadership strategies to help guide students engaging in authentic research experiences, and
  • collaborate with each other to overcome challenges and develop best practices for research mentoring.

These interactive workshops will guide participants through the process of creating, managing, and developing a research team while simultaneously fostering the development of the research-intensive community.

Any graduate student, any methodology, and any stage of research will benefit from the skills and community developed in this pilot program.

Please join us for Workshop #1—Building a Research-Intensive Community on Friday, December 11 @ 3-4:30pm CST.

To register, please RSVP using this link: https://tamu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0IEjHcPzg1FdNnn

Upon submission, you will receive an email with the Zoom link for the workshop. If you do not receive a Zoom link, please contact Andrew McNeely (amcneely@tamu.edu).

Online Symposium: British Muslims and COVID-19: Impacts, Experiences and Responses

Tuesday 8th December 2020, 1pm to 5pm

An MBRN online symposium via Zoom

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/british-muslims-and-covid-19-impacts-experiences-and-responses-tickets-129223730657

Full Programme available at: http://www.mbrn.org.uk/registration-open-british-muslims-and-covid-19/

Research on Covid-19 has highlighted its disproportionate impact on Black and Asian Minority Ethnic groups (BAME) communities (Public Health England, 2020). However, these studies only offer a limited understanding of the particularity of experiences within the umbrella category BAME. For instance, there is only limited discussion around faith in relation to Covid-19, its impacts and the socio-economic fall-outs of lockdown. This MBRN symposium will redress this gap by taking an intersectional perspective in mapping and analysing the impact of Covid-19 on British Muslim communities. By bringing together practitioners and academics, we will examine how diverse British Muslim communities have experienced the pandemic, how their lives have been impacted during and after lockdown and how they responded.
By focusing on the experiences of British Muslims, this online symposium will enable us to examine the interplay of ethnicity, religion and deprivation, in negotiating the particular challenges of living through Covid-19. It will explore the diversity of ways in which British Muslims have experienced and responded to Covid-19, and seek to understand its ongoing impacts. Our aim is to suggest answers for the question, “How are diverse British Muslims living through, and responding to the challenges of, Covid-19?”.
The symposium includes presentations from academics and practitioners from a range of epistemological positions and disciplinary standpoints to explore dimensions of Muslim identity / lived experiences in relation to the pandemic, lockdown and subsequent socio-economic implications of Covid-19 in Britain.
Eventbrite registration essential, please select your preference for the parallel session during registration so you can be pre-assigned to a breakout room.

Grant program: Integrating Social Science within African Theology

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The Nagel Institute, with generous support from the Templeton Religion Trust, invites project proposals for “Engaging African Realities: Integrating Social Science within African Theology.” Its aim is to support African theologians to engage in fresh social scientific integrated approaches with the goal of producing creative and original projects in grounded theology. We understand grounded theology as an attempt at realizing the potential of theological creativity from the bottom-up, as opposed to a top-down approach. The project seeks to emphasize how grounded theology is compatible with grounded theory in social sciences as a method for seeking hidden patterns and meanings through ethnography, a way to unearth stories and enable answers to questions from African realities. The 12 awards, of not more than $50,000 USD each, will enable grantees to participate in three intensive workshops on social science theory, methods and skills needed for grounded theology, and provide support for research on one of two topical areas:

  • African traditional values and spirituality with reference to religious experience
  • Religious innovation and competition focusing on African resources for innovation

Visit nagelinstitute.org for a comprehensive list of key questions and complete RFP instructions.
Proposals accepted in English, French, or Portuguese.

Applications by 15 September, 2020
Full Proposals (by invitation only) 1 December, 2020

Call for Proposals: Engaging African Realities: Integrating Social Science within African Theology

Engaging African Realities: Integrating Social Science within African Theology

The Nagel Institute, with generous support from the Templeton Religion Trust, invites project proposals for “Engaging African Realities: Integrating Social Science within African Theology.” Its aim is to support African theologians to engage in fresh social scientific integrated approaches with the goal of producing creative and original projects in grounded theology. We understand grounded theology as an attempt at realizing the potential of theological creativity from the bottom-up, as opposed to a top-down approach. The project seeks to emphasize how grounded theology is compatible with grounded theory in social sciences as a method for seeking hidden patterns and meanings through ethnography, a way to unearth stories and enable answers to questions from African realities. The 12 awards, of not more than $50,000 USD each, will enable grantees to participate in three intensive workshops on social science theory, methods and skills needed for grounded theology, and provide support for research on one of two topical areas:

  • African traditional values and spirituality with reference to religious experience
  • Religious innovation and competition focusing on African resources for innovation

Visit nagelinstitute.org for a comprehensive list of key questions and complete RFP instructions.

Proposals accepted in English, French, or Portuguese.

We encourage you to forward this announcement to any early-career (having received their PhD in the past 10 years) African theologian interested in the use of social science research methods in pursuit of grounded theological research.

Contacts

Nagel Institute, Calvin University
3201 Burton St SE
Grand Rapids, MI 49546 USA

email: nagel@calvin.edu
phone: +1-616-526-7155
Visit our website!

Nagel Institute for the Study of World Christianity at Calvin University | 3201 Burton Street SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546

ICSOR Newsletter Posted

The recent Newsletter of the International Center for the Sociology of Religion has been posted on the organization’s website.  http://www.icsor.it/

Available in both English and Italian, the newsletter contains information about:

  • The ECSOR International Grant Program for 2020
  • An announcement about the School for Advanced Training in the Sociology of Religion (SAFSOR), which will be held later this autumn.
  • Two scholarships available to young researchers at the Summer School on Religions in San Cimignano.
  • Reports on this year’s grant program and last year’s SAFSOR.
  • Much other information.

Masterclass on ‘Critical Religion’

All Postgraduate, Honours and Undergraduate Students are invited to
A Masterclass on Critical Religion’ – How Theory that Deconstructs the Category of ‘Religion’ Can Lead to Better Research

With Visiting UoN Fellow
Prof Naomi Goldenberg, Professor of Classics and Religious Studies
University of Ottawa, Canada

10am -12.30pm (X301) NeW Space City Campus, University of Newcastle, December 4, 2019

This Masterclass is free to all students and is supported by the Centre for the Study of Violence, University of Newcastle.

Register by email to Dr Kathleen McPhillips (Kathleen.mcphillips@newcastle.edu.au)

Description of Masterclass
Over the last two decades, a growing number of academics who study ‘religion’ have noticed that the idea that is foundational for their scholarship is fiction. I mean fiction in the Latin sense of factus as signifying something that is made, built, or constructed.  This insight opposes notions of ‘religion’ as a thing or phenomenon that has always existed everywhere in one form or another and that continues to manifest itself in different traditions and configurations throughout the globe. Proponents of “critical religion” understand religion to be a somewhat incoherent, rather recent concept that is projected as an anachronism onto history.  According to this view, ‘religion’ is a modern, discursive product of differing, context-specific, dynamics of power with particular relation to the politics of colonialism and statecraft.  Attendant terms and ideas such as ‘secular’ and ‘sacred’ are looked at similarly.

“Critical religion” is sometimes dismissed as mere semantics and/or as irrelevant to ‘the real world’ in which religion is assumed to exist and is treated as a powerful force in law, culture and experience.  Professor Goldenberg disagrees and will argue that better thinking about government, public policy and scholarly research depends on recognizing the confusion adhering to ‘religion’ as a category of analysis and rejecting it in favor of more coherent concepts.

Prof Goldenberg will use her own work on government and feminism to demonstrate how critical religion can be productively applied.  To prepare for the masterclass, participants will be asked to read two of her papers and then during the Masterclass be invited to think about their own research projects in terms of this deconstructive approach.