Category Archives: Publishing Opportunities

Call for papers: Special journal issue on ‘Leadership, Authority and Representation in British Muslim Communities’

Special Issue of the journal ‘Religions’

Following our very successful one-day conference on ‘Leadership, Authority and Representation in British Muslim Communities’ at Cardiff University last month, we are now actively seeking articles for a Special Issue of the international peer-review journal Religions<https://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/special_issues/bmc> on the same conference theme. This edition of the journal is being co-edited by Professor Sophie Gilliat-Ray and Dr Riyaz Timol.
We are inviting articles of 5,000-8,000 words (including all references and footnotes) by 25th April, though there may be scope to extend that deadline by a few weeks (only) if this makes the difference in terms of potential contributions.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you would like further information. We very much hope you will consider the submission of a paper. Please do circulate to your networks.

With thanks
Sophie Gilliat-Ray and Riyaz Timol

Call for Papers: Human Rights Working Paper Series

Dedicated to interdisciplinary and critical dialogue on international human rights law and discourse, the Rapoport Center’s Working Paper Series (WPS) publishes innovative papers by established and early-career researchers as well as practitioners. The goal is to provide a productive environment for debate about human rights among academics, policymakers, activists, practitioners, and the public.

Authors from all disciplines and institutions are welcome to submit papers on any topic related to human rights.
Submissions undergo a rigorous selection process by the WPS interdisciplinary editorial committee, which includes graduate students and faculty from across the University of Texas. The WPS committee provides detailed comments and feedback to authors before the paper is published online.

Publication in the WPS does not preclude future publication elsewhere; in fact, many of our working papers have since been published in academic journals and edited volumes.

For the 2018-9 series, the Editorial Committee is accepting submissions on a rolling basis.
For more information, please visit: rapoportcenter.org/working-paper-series/ or contact rcwps@law.utexas.edu.

Journal of Dharma Studies

Journal of Dharma Studies

Philosophy, Theology, Ethics, and Culture

Journal of Dharma Studies Philosophy, Theology, Ethics, and Culture

We are delighted to announce the inaugural issue of the Journal of Dharma Studies.

The concept of the Journal of Dharma Studies arose from the scholarship produced by a learned society, the Dharma Academy of North America (DANAM), which has been meeting annually for over fifteen years in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion (AAR). Over this time, nearly a thousand scholars have participated in or attended the conferences of DANAM and helped foster analytical-constructive and translational research and scholarship on various fields and sub-disciplines. All of which comprise the diverse expressions of the Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist religious traditions.

All articles published with Dharma Studies will be free to access until 2020. We hope you will enjoy the first issue and will sign up to receive the table of contents of every new issue published.

If you have any questions about the journal do not hesitate to contact the editors-in-chief.

Rita D. Sherma, Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, USA
Purushottama Bilimoria , Graduate Theological Union and University of California, Berkeley, USA; The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

CFP: “Gendering Jesus”

Special Issue of Religion and Gender

Guest editors Jamie Pitts (Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary, US) and Peter-Ben Smit (Free University Amsterdam/Utrecht University, the Netherlands) have just issued a call for papers for the Religion and Gender special issue entitled ‘Gendering Jesus’.

We invite you to review the call for papers at https://www.religionandgender.org/announcement/, or check it in attachment.
Please, do forward the call for papers in your networks and/or feel warmly invited to consider submitting a manuscript.
Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

Call for Papers: Conference on “The Ahmadiyya Muslim community In Scholarly Perspective” May 23-23, 2019

Venue: Faculty of Comparative Study of Religion and Humanism (FVG) Bist 164 – B-2610 Wilrijk-Antwerpen. Belgium. Tel.: +32 (0)3 830 51 58.

We are interested in organizing a conference on the Ahmadis and Ahmadiyya in which the speakers examine

  • Its theology- Christology
  • Its history,
  • Its organization, governance and associated groups,
  • Membership: numbers, growth, sociological profile. International expansion,
  • Iconography,
  • Their original territories and their international developments, as well as their various types of changes,
  • Judicial issues addressing its status; prosecution in certain countries,
  • Media relations and media coverage,
  • Impact on humanitarianism, art and culture in general,
  • Influences in popular culture,
  • The peculiar way of placing itself within the Islamic world, from which it is considered “heretical”
  • Relationship with the broader society.

This list of topics above is not exhaustive. We welcome additional studies or surveys completed or in process on the Ahmadiyya and its followers.

As for our previous conferences, we will prepare the publication of the best papers, once the scientific committee has reviewed them. You may see our publications on www.antwerpfvg.org.  We plan our conferences on one or two days, presuming there will about 12 speakers. Our requirement is to make sure speakers have a scholarly record and training even if they do not work in an academic background. Doctoral students are welcome. We do not offer grants or stipends to participants, and every participant has to pay registration fees.

Organized By:

The European Observatory of Religion and Secularism (Laïcité) in partnership with Faculty of Comparative Study of Religion and Humanism (FVG), Lirec (Rome), CLIMAS (Bordeaux), Cesnur (Turin).

Practical Information

E-mail: info@antwerpfvg.org 
WEB: www.antwerpfvg.org 
Language of the conference: English.

Submitting

Send a 10 line abstract, with a 5 line résumé of your previous work and a short biography to:

  • Régis Dericquebourg, Associate Professor at the FVG and President of the European Observatory of Religions and laïcité (secularism): Associate member of the Group of Sociology of Religion and Laicité. CNRS: Paris. France. redericq@netcourrier.com
  • and/or to Bernadette Rigal-Cellard, Professor in North American Studies, Université Michel de Montaigne, member de CLIMAS (Culture et littératures du monde anglo saxon), Bordeaux. France Vice-President of the Observatory of Religion and Laicité. bcellard@numericable.fr
  • and/ or Raffaella Di Marzio. Director of Lirec: centrostudilirec@gmail.com
  • and/or Massimo Introvigne. Director of the Cesnur. maxintrovigne@gmail.com
  • and/or Chris Vonck, rector of the Faculty for Comparative religion and Humanism (FVG). fvg.faculteit@skynet.be 
  • And/or Willy Fautre. Director of Human Rights Without Frontiers, w.fautre@hrwf.org

Papers will be considered for publication, with editorial details given during the conference. It is understood that each presenter must submit his or her paper first to the organizers for possible inclusion in the conference proceedings. When submitting the abstract, please inform the committee whether the paper has been submitted for review or publication in another venue.

Proposal Deadline: March 30, 2019

Registration and Transportation:

Registration Fee: 100 euros and 15 euros for each lunch.
Students: 30 euros and 10 euros each lunch.
There are many hotels in Antwerp and a few in the nearby town of Mortsel, which are discoverable online, and each attendee should book directly. FVG is located off of a bus line to downtown Antwerp.

CFP: Religious urbanization and moral economies of development in Africa

Call for Chapter Submissions

Abstracts are invited for an interdisciplinary volume on Religious urbanization and moral economies of development in Africa, edited by David Garbin (University of Kent), Simon Coleman (University of Toronto) and Gareth Millington (University of York). The volume will critically explore how processes related to religious urbanization intersect with different notions of development in African contexts. Cities are taken to be powerful venues for the creation and implementation of models of development whose moral, temporal, and political assumptions need to be examined, not least as they intersect with religious templates for the planning and reform of urban space.

The themes and problematics to be discussed in this volume reflect the broader focus of the Religious Urbanization in Africa project (see https://rua-project.ac.uk/). These include (but are not limited to):

  • The ways urban faith-based practices of ‘development’ – through for example the provision of basic infrastructure, utilities, housing, health and educational facilities – link moral subjectivities with individual and wider narratives/aspirations of modernization, change, deliverance or prosperity
  • The ideals of belonging and citizenship promoted by religious visions of the ‘ideal city’ and how these are materially articulated in concrete urban developments
  • How models of infrastructural development mobilized by religious actors may conflict or cohere with existing regimes of planning in specific urban contexts as well as with international development discourses
  • The ways in which religious actors and groups may provide resources to negotiate unpredictability and socio-economic uncertainties through production of urban/infrastructural space

We welcome empirically-grounded qualitative case studies or comparative approaches (including but not limited to Islam or Christianity), in particular chapters linking urban change in African context(s), religious place-making, and ‘development’ discourses and practices at various scales.

The proposal for this volume has been invited for a new Bloomsbury book series, ‘Studies in Religion, Space and Place’.

Please submit abstracts of up to 300 words no later than 20 November 2018 to ruaproject@kent.ac.uk

Accepted chapters in full (6000-7000 words) will be due by 1 June 2019.

CFP: Special Journal Issue of “Religions”

Special Issue: Islam in Europe, European Islam

Deadline: 31 January 2019

Guest Editors

Prof. Dr. Stefano Allievi,  University of Padua, stefano.allievi@unipd.it
Prof. Dr. Thijl Sunier, VU University Amsterdam, j.t.sunier@vu.nl  

Interests: Islamic movements, authority, Islam and popular culture.

The scope of the special issue “Islam in Europe, European Islam?” is to explore and underline trends, some very visible, others seemingly marginal, which are transforming Muslim communities and Islamic landscapes in Europe in recent years.

Much of the research carried out among Muslims in Europe seems still being trapped in nationally specific formats, thereby implicitly depicting Muslims as homogenous national communities. Rather than focusing on the common nationally specific developments in the legal, organizational, doctrinal and political sphere, the special issue seeks to identify a number of cross-national, or supra-national thematic fields as angles that capture these trends. These fields may be rooted in developments specific to Islam and Muslim communities in Europe, but they may also address the question how global developments take shape locally.

The themes listed below are by no means exhaustive, but together they may indicate important trends and developments that provide clues about the tremendous diversification currently taking place among Muslims. It throws into stark relief what is meant by “European Islam” because this epithet has often been applied by politicians, journalists, and academics to denote a specific ‘domesticated’ form of Islam that conforms to dominant national values and principles. Such a frame of reference tends to ignore important developments among Muslims. The special issue addresses some of these trends.   

There is a vast literature on the subjects related to “Muslims in Europe” or “Islam in Europe”, to which many of us have contributed in the last decades. We invite scholars in the field of Islam in Europe to write an article for this special issue indicating intriguing and relevant trends. We do not propose a total new set up, but instead invite researchers to address what they consider important developments.

Please write the editors for more details.

CFP: Special journal issue on “Fashion/Religion Interfaces”

Call for papers for a special issue of the journal Religions

The complex interconnections between religious beliefs and fashion in clothing have been increasingly recognised by researchers, journalists and fashion producers. At the same time, fashion has begun to be a force that can shape religious communities and create debates, often of a controversial nature, within and between faiths. This special issue of Religions will explore these matters, focusing on sartorial fashion/religion interfaces in their diverse and multiple forms across the world today.

Fashion scholarship has long claimed that no-one exists fully outside of fashion systems. Yet many religious believers, especially those with more conservative mindsets, think that they are not influenced by secular and commercial fashion trends. So, who is right? At the same time, some religiously-oriented individuals may embrace fashion fully, while others might seek to balance fashionability with religious precepts and forms of conduct. Which sorts of balancing and mediating are occurring across the world today, among different religious groups in diverse locations? Which social and cultural forces and contexts shape these balancing acts? What are the differences between religiously-oriented dress practices in ‘home’ countries and in diasporic contexts? How are these matters bound up with globalization processes?

Most scholarly attention on fashion/religion interfaces has been on women’s dress practices, but what about men? In what ways do dynamics to do with sexualities, ethnicities, classes, disabilities, and other social factors impact on religiously-aware dress choices?

While the major scholarly and political focus has recently been on the relations between Islam and fashion, especially in terms of veiling, people with other religious affiliations must also make choices regarding fashion and dress issues. Papers focusing on any religion and belief system, and on any geographical (and/or virtual) location, are welcomed for this special edition. Articles comparing different religious and/or sectarian groups are also invited.

Contributions are sought from diverse disciplinary and inter-disciplinary backgrounds across the social sciences and humanities. Papers which report novel empirical findings, and innovate in theoretical and methodological terms, are particularly encouraged.

Special issue website with submission instructions: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/special_issues/fashion

Submission deadline: 1 April 2019

Queries: Anna-Mari Almila a.almila@fashion.arts.ac.uk

Call for Chapter Proposals: Religious urbanization and moral economies of development in Africa

Abstracts are invited for an interdisciplinary volume on Religion urbanization and moral economies of development in Africa, edited by David Garbin (University of Kent), Simon Coleman (University of Toronto) and Gareth Millington (University of York). The volume will critically explore how processes related to religious urbanization intersect with different notions of development in African contexts. Cities are taken to be powerful venues for the creation and implementation of models of development whose moral, temporal, and political assumptions need to be examined, not least as they intersect with religious templates for the planning and reform of urban space.

The themes and problematics to be discussed in this volume reflect the broader focus of the Religious Urbanization in Africa project (see https://rua-project.ac.uk/). These include (but are not limited to):

  • The ways urban faith-based practices of ‘development’ – through for example the provision of basic infrastructure, utilities, housing, health and educational facilities – link moral subjectivities with individual and wider narratives/aspirations of modernization, change, deliverance or prosperity
  • The ideals of belonging and citizenship promoted by religious visions of the ‘ideal city’ and how these are materially articulated in concrete urban developments
  • How models of infrastructural development mobilized by religious actors may conflict or cohere with existing regimes of planning in specific urban contexts as well as with international development discourses
  • The ways in which religious actors and groups may provide resources to negotiate unpredictability and socio-economic uncertainties through production of urban/infrastructural space

We welcome empirically-grounded qualitative case studies or comparative approaches (including but not limited to Islam or Christianity), in particular chapters linking urban change in African context(s), religious place-making, and ‘development’ discourses and practices at various scales.

The proposal for this volume has been invited for the Bloomsbury book series, ‘Studies in Religion, Space and Place’.

Please submit abstracts of up to 300 words no later than 20 November 2018 to ruaproject@kent.ac.uk

Accepted chapters in full (6000-7000 words) will be due by 1 June 2019.

Call for Papers: Religious Practices and the Internet

Journal: RESET: recherches en sciences sociales sur internet / social science research on the internet

reset@openedition.org
http://reset.revues.org
ISSN 4939–0247

CALL FOR Papers: Religious Practices and the Internet

Deadline for abstract submissions: SEPTEMBER 7th, 2018

Special issue edited by Fabienne Duteil-Ogata (Clare EA4596, Université Bordeaux-Montaigne / IIAC [EHESS/CNRS]) and Isabelle Jonveaux (CéSor, EHESS)

In the past few years, when tragic events have been associated with religious radicalization, the Internet has been often pointed out. For instance, for fundamentalist groups such as Daesh or Al Qaida, digital social networks may be an opportunity to recruit people beyond geographical borders (Udrescu 2013, Torok 2010, 2011). Nevertheless, behind such specific and highly mediatized cases, it must not be forgotten that the Internet’s uses have grown in almost any religious group, to become today something as common as unavoidable (Dawson & Cowan, 2004, Knoblauch, 2009, Campbell, 2010, Cheong et al., 2012, Jonveaux, 2013).

This special issue precisely aims at exploring how the Internet affects religion or conversely, how religion can transform digital media. These questions may be discussed at least from two standpoints. On the one hand, one can consider that religions have always used media and that there is in fact no religion without media (Krotz, 2007). This theory relies on the conceptualization of religions as communication systems. The use of digital media by religious institutions is consequently unsurprising, because throughout history and often very fast, they have invested the major communication developments, such as the printing press in the Middle Age (Eisenstein, 2005 [1983]) or telephone and then television since the end of the 19th century (Sastre Santos, 1997). In this perspective, digital media has brought nothing really new to religions and what is observed online is nothing but an extension or the reflection of the current trends related to religious matters and its modernity (Jonveaux, 2013). On the other hand, the opposite position considers that new media transform both religions’ contents and practices (Hjarvard, 2013). They lead precisely to the creation of new religious forms or “cyberreligions” (Hojsgaard, 2005) in which religious institutions as well as religious practices exist only online, like in the case The Church of the Blind Chihuahua or the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster for example, even though some of these religions have clearly a parodic dimension (Obadia, 2015). In this perspective, the Internet can be seen as a tool that has carried something original and exclusive to the practice of religions, far from only reproducing online offline practices.

To go beyond these seemingly antithetical approaches, a solution may be to go back to the classic categories of the sociology of religion and ask how much the Internet has (or not) transformed them. Simultaneously, this implies to lead empirical studies dedicated to the description of religions as lived by online users or to the religious institutions which observe and integrate digital uses to a certain extent. For this special issue, we have therefore identified at least four research directions (detailed below) in which potential contributors could inscribe their article proposals.

Areas of research

  1. Rituals, Worship, Prayers and Celebrations

  2. Identities, Belongings, Avatars and Communities
  3. Asceticism, Fasting and Prohibitions

  4. Conversion, Education and Transmission

Calendar and practical information

The abstracts (500 words maximum) are due by September 7th, 2018. They should be sent to the following address: reset@openedition.org.

Proposals may be written either in English or in French, and should state the research question, the methodology, and the theoretical framework. They will focus on the scientific relevance of the proposed article in light of the existing literature and the call for papers, and may be accompanied by a short bibliography. We also would like to draw the authors’ attention to a special section in the journal called “Revisiting the Classics”, devoted to new readings of classical authors and theories in the context of digital media: for this special issue, papers centered on the re-exploration of classical authors and categories from the social sciences of religion will be particularly appreciated.

The abstracts will be reviewed anonymously by the issue editors and the members of the journal editorial board. Authors of submissions selected at this stage will be asked to e-mail their full papers by November 12th, 2018 for another double-blind peer review evaluation.

The journal RESET also accepts submissions for its “Varia” section, open to scholarly works in the Humanities and Social Sciences dealing with Internet-related objects or methods of research.

Calendar :

Deadline for abstract submission (500 words maximum, plus references): September 7th, 2018.
Responses to authors: September 20th, 2018.
Deadline for full papers (6 000 to 10 000 words, plus references): November 12th, 2018.

Contact:

Editorial board reset@openedition.org

Coordinators: