Category Archives: Research Funding

Research Associate / Visiting Faculty: Women’s Studies in Religion Program

HARVARD DIVINITY SCHOOL announces five full-time non-tenure track positions as Research Associate and Visiting Faculty for 2020-21 in its Women’s Studies and Religion Program.  Proposals for book-length projects utilizing both religion and gender as central categories of analysis and focusing on any religion are welcomed.  Salary for 2020-21 will be $60,000.  Completed applications are due online by October 15, 2019.  Applicants must have received their PhD by October 1, 2019.  Please see our website (http://wsrp.hds.harvard.edu/apply) for more information.

Employer Description:
The Women’s Studies in Religion Program was founded in 1973 to explore the fundamental role played by religious traditions in defining roles for women and men.  Research on religion and gender sheds light on questions about the changing roles of women both inside religious communities and in broader public spheres.  The Program’s goal is the production of new primary research addressing these and related issues and the dispersal of that information through courses, publications, and public programs.

RFP: The Sociology of Science and Religion: Identity and Belief Formation

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

The Sociology of Science and Religion: Identity and Belief Formation

Rice University and the University of California, San Diego are pleased to announce a $2.9 million re-granting initiative.  The “Science and Religion: Identity and Belief Formation” project will specifically fund sociological research that empirically examines how identities and beliefs are related to science and religion.  This project has been designed to provide support for new scholarship in the sociology of science and religion. The project, led by Elaine Howard Ecklund (Rice University) and John H. Evans (University of California, San Diego), is funded through the Templeton Religion Trust and coordinated by The Issachar Fund.

Religion and science are perhaps the dominant ways of meaning making in the late modern world.  While theologians and philosophers have built an impressive body of work on how science and religion should relate, and historians on how people have connected science and religion in the past, we know little about how contemporary people actually understand the science and religion interface.  This project on the sociology of science and religion, with a focus on beliefs and identities, is running concurrently with, and interacting with, separate yet aligned proposals in cognitive science/psychology and evolutionary anthropology.

We can imagine sociologists asking a number of questions within this broad framework.  We offer just a few examples: How do aligned identities (such as race, class, and gender identities) intersect with religious identities to shape beliefs about science, and beliefs about the relationship between religion and science? How do people use religion and science to anchor their identities in the modern world?  For example, are there people for whom science is an identity that operates in a manner similar to how religion operates as a source of identity?  Do people use religion and science to establish other identities? Given that people experience religion and science at the same time in their lives, how do people combine these perspectives to form meaningful action?

Awards for projects related to this initiative are available through the following five award types:

  1. Sociology graduate student fellowships ($50,000 each for a total of two years of funding).
  2. A two-year postdoctoral fellowship for a sociologist to be in residence at Rice University.
  3. Research grants ($100,000 each) for early career sociologists.
  4. Research grants ($200,000 each) for mid-career sociologists.
  5. Research grants ($200,000 each) for senior sociologists.

All awards will run two years in length. Early-career, mid-career, and senior scholar awards are eligible to begin as early as April 1, 2020; all projects must be completed by June 30, 2022. Graduate student and post-doctoral fellowships will begin on July 1, 2020 and must be completed by June 30, 2022. Letters of Intent are due October 15, 2019 for faculty grants, and January 15, 2020 for graduate student and postdoc awards.

For complete information about grant application eligibility, instructions and deadlines, download the full RFP from:  www.religion-science-sociology.com

John H. Evans
Tata Chancellor’s Chair in Social Sciences
Professor of Sociology
Associate Dean of Social Sciences,
Co-Director, Institute for Practical Ethics
University of California, San Diego

Job Opening: Muslim-Christian Studies Research Fellow

The Centre for Muslim-Christian Studies <www.cmcsoxford.org.uk>, an independent academic centre, is seeking to appoint a full-time Muslim Research Fellow, based in Oxford, for a three-year contract commencing on 1st October 2019, or as soon as possible thereafter.

The Research Fellow will conduct research in the area of Muslim-Christian studies, either  theological, historical or sociological. The main aim would be to produce a high-quality  monograph on an area of the candidate’s choosing in discussion with CMCS. In addition, the Research Fellow would participate in other academic activities at CMCS, including (for example) teaching and advising a range of students who come to the Centre,  engaging with practitioners in the field of Muslim-Christian Relations, and contributing on an agreed basis to CMCS projects such as the Summer School for Christian and Muslim leaders in training,

Hikmah Guides and the Christians and Muslims in Public Life Project.
For further information see
https://www.timeshighereducation.com/unijobs/listing/172669/muslim-research-fellow-/

PhD Scholarships on “The African Diaspora and Pentecostalism in Australia”

Dear colleagues,

We are offering 2 PhD scholarships (1 based in Sydney and 1 in Perth) as part of the Australian Research Council (ARC) funded project: “The African Diaspora and Pentecostalism in Australia: New Perspectives on Materiality, Media and Religion.”

This project investigates the new African Diaspora in Australia and its embrace of Pentecostalism, particularly after arrival. The African community in Australia has often been associated with poor settlement outcomes, and has also been on the receiving end of a racialised moral panic. The project aims: to understand the range of challenges African-Australian communities faces; to determine why so many of their members join Pentecostal churches; to investigate how Pentecostal churches support these communities’ translocal and transnational mobility and sense of belonging, and; to contribute to policy efforts to improve outcomes for African new arrivals in Australia.

Within this larger project, the PhD candidates will conduct ethnographic research with Pentecostal churches in Australia, and with African Diasporas in the country. Both projects will investigate questions such as: how do Pentecostal churches support/hinder processes of settlement and ‘integration’? How do some Pentecostal megachurches generate transnational religious fields – ones which may harness resources from branches elsewhere in the world? And what impact does all of this have on Australian cities’ post-secular social landscapes?

We welcome applicants from a range of backgrounds: anthropology, sociology, religious studies, African studies, Migration studies or a related field. In particular, the project is suitable for candidates with strong interests in the intersections of migration and religion. Applications from students of African heritage are especially welcomed.

Deadline: 30 June 2019

For more details, see

  1. https://www.westernsydney.edu.au/graduate_research_school/grs/scholarships/current_scholarships/current_scholarships/ssap_the_african_diaspora_and_pentecostalism_in_australia (Religion and Society Research Centre, School of Social Sciences and Psychology, Western Sydney University, Sydney)
  2. http://www.scholarships.uwa.edu.au/search?sc_view=1&id=8941 (, at the School of Social Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth).

Prof Cristina Rocha
Director of Religion and Society Research Cluster |School of Social Sciences and Psychology
Western Sydney University
President: Australian Association for the Study of Religion

Jameel Scholarships

The Islam-UK Centre at Cardiff University is pleased to invite applications for this year’s Jameel Scholarships, starting September 2019.

Three fully-funded scholarships are available for the MA course ‘Islam in Contemporary Britain’.  Each scholarship will cover full UK/EU tuition fees and provide students with a £15,000 stipend as well as a £1,000 research
allowance.  For more information, refer to http://sites.cardiff.ac.uk/islamukcentre/jameel-scholarships/

Closing date for scholarship applications: 24th May 2019.

Please circulate among your networks and encourage interested final year undergraduate students to apply!

For all enquiries, please contact: jameelscholarships@cardiff.ac.uk

Fellowship Programme, University of Durham

New fellowship programme – calling for applications for the first fellow (deadline 30 September 2018).

Durham University has just launched the Mohamed Ali Foundation Fellowship programme, linked to the Abbas Hilmi II Papers which are deposited at Durham University Library. Digital copies of the Papers are also held at the American University and CULTNAT in Cairo. The fellowship carries a grant, accommodation and meals, and the first residency (14 Jan-22 Mar 2019) will be a valuable research and publication opportunity for an established specialist on 19th and early 20th-century Egypt: more details are provided in the attached notices.
Attached are a media release, an advert for the role of the first fellow, and a document more fully describing the role and responsibilities of this position. The deadline for applications is 30 September 2018. Enquiries may be directed to maf.fellow@durham.ac.uk.
This information is also available online at https://www.dur.ac.uk/library/asc/abbashilmi/

PhD fellowship in Tromsø, Norway: Indigenous Religion(s) in the Media

A doctoral research fellowship (PhD) in religious studies is available at the University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway. 

Topic: Indigenous religion(s) in the media. Applicants should propose a case study of how indigenous practices from one particular indigenous community are articulated or represented as religious and/or spiritual in one or more media and broadcasted locally, nationally, regionally, and/or globally. Which translations do the practices then undergo? Who controls these translations? What do they generate? The research project should also shed light on the broader political and social situation of the indigenous community and ask how such articulations or representations in different media have both political and religious significance.

The PhD project will be part of the research group “Indigenous Religion(s): Local Grounds, Global Networks” (INREL) that studies articulations of indigenous religion(s) in different contexts around the world and explores the relations between local and globalizing discourses of indigeneity and religion.

The appointment is a fixed term position for a period of four years, includes teaching and administration duties, and comes with a salary.

Deadline for application 20 August 2018.

For more information, see the full announcement at https://www.jobbnorge.no/en/available-jobs/job/154628/doctoral-research-fellowship-in-religious-studies-at-uit-the-arctic-university-of-norway

For questions about the position, please contact professor Siv Ellen Kraft (siv.ellen.kraft@uit.no / +47-77644390) or professor Bjørn Ola Tafjord (bjorn.tafjord@uit.no / +47-77645289)

Dissertation Fellowships, University of Victoria

The Centre for Studies in Religion and Society at UVic offers fellowships ($5000 plus a private office for a year) to people in the thesis or dissertation phases of their graduate programs. Visits of less than a year are also possible. 

These fellowships will allow students to be part of a vital interdisciplinary intellectual and social space in which they can focus on their writing. Over the last 25 years, we have been fortunate to host visiting graduate students from many other universities. Now, we are able to offer some funding to help support visiting students interested in completing their writing within a unique scholarly environment. 

Most applicants would already have external funding from SSHRC or their home university. So, our funding would not cover all expenses, but it should make a significant contribution. The deadline for applications is the middle of November, 2017 and the fellowships would begin sometime after spring, 2018. ​

Please see: http://www.uvic.ca/research/centres/csrs/fellowships-awards/apply/graduate/index.php

Students interested in this opportunity should contact me (bramadat@uvic.ca), or my colleague Sally Lin (csrsadmin@uvic.ca).

Paul Bramadat

Post-Doctoral Position: “Islamic Activists in Exile”

Please find below the call for application for 2 year post-doctoral position based at CEFRES (Prague)  on the topic “Islamic Activists in Exile: Europe, Middle East and South-Asia. Deadline: 23 August 2017. 

Topic 3: “Islamic Activists in Exile: Europe, Middle East and South-Asia”

This research project will associate one post-doctoral researcher with CAS researcher Giedre Sabaseviciute.

Description: Candidates will be expected to contribute to the project on the contemporary exiled Islamic activists in European, Middle Eastern and South-Asian cities. The project aims to research the ways in which the experience of exile affect the trajectories of activism, focusing on how different national context influence their career choices, which vary between the continuation of activism, involvement into different causes, or disengagement. Possible research topics include but are not restricted to 1- circulation of ideas, norms and activism through human networks; 2- patterns of activist network formation; 3- relationship between the exiled activists and their host countries; 4- continuities and ruptures in individual trajectories of activism. Candidates are expected to have conducted their doctoral research in one of the regions covered by the project (The Gulf, Turkey, South-Asia), to be proficient of one of its languages (Turkish, Arabic, Malay), and have an important knowledge of the fieldwork. Interdisciplinary approach is preferred, as well as some experience in ethnographic and biographical research, media studies, and discourse analysis.
Applicants may contact Giedre Sabaseviciute before applying for any relevant questions on their application. Please write to: saba@orient.cas.cz

More information can be found on http://www.cefres.cz/en/6214