Category Archives: Seminars

Religious Healing and Sacred Health Curing: Online Documentary Film Program and Debate

The Network of the Anthropology of the Middle East and Central Eurasia of the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) in collaboration with the Religion and Society Research Cluster, Western Sydney University are organising a new series of online biweekly documentary film presentations and debates regarding Religious Healing and Sacred Health Curing.

During our current complex situation caused by COVID-19, this program should be considered a unique platform for specialists of the field in which they will be able to watch collectively documentary films which in one way or another discuss the role of religion, religious rituals, sacred sites and material religion in religious healing and sacred health curing. The film presentations will be continued by a debate between the moderator, filmmakers and the specialists of the field.

Week 2: July 25, 2020 10:00 AM in London (7pm Sydney time)

Please join our second biweekly webinar (25 July 2020), documentary film presentation and debate organized by the Network of the Anthropology of the Middle East and Central Eurasia of EASA in collaboration with the Religion and Society Research Cluster, Western Sydney University.

Introduction to the program by Dr. P. Khosronejad (Western Sydney University), and debate by filmmaker Dr. R. Canals (University of Barcelona), researcher of film Dr. R. Sarró (University of Oxford) and discussant Dr. R. Blanes (University of Gothenburg).

Film presentation: Chasing Shadows
Roger Canals, 2019, 70 minutes, UK / Spain.

Synopsis

This film is directed by Roger Canals and filmed in Guinea-Bissau based on Ramon Sarró and Marina Temudo’s research, offers an intimate portrait of a prophetic movement. In Balanta, the movement is called Kyangyang, a word meaning “shadows”, although its followers also call themselves “Children of God”. The Kyangyang prophetic movement was born in the early 1980s among Balanta farmers in rural areas of Guinea-Bissau, after a period of ecological and political crisis and after a young woman called Ntombikte, who died in 2013, started to prophesize and heal after receiving messages from God through her ancestors. She had a massive following among young men and women. Much like the prophetess, her followers could communicate with their ancestors and then either transmit messages from the high God through prophetic art and writing, glossolalia, and divination or heal in collective and individual ceremonies.

This webinar will be held on Zoom.

To register please visit:

https://uws.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_SWswR_jCSG2Zeb2iBl75Bw

Inform Seminar [Online]: Sexual Abuse framed by Faith or Belief – Exploring boundaries and contexts

Wednesday 22 July 7-8:30pm (in London – British Summer Time)The next Inform seminar will be held online

Please register your attendance by making a voluntary donation to Inform from the link on the website here: https://inform.ac/seminars.

Please make sure that you share your contact details with Inform so that we can send you a link to the Zoom meeting. 

If you cannot make a donation at this time, but would still like to attend, please email inform@kcl.ac.uk directly.

Overview of the Seminar

Many of the cults and new religious movements of the 1970s were assumed to be awash with abusive behaviour. However, high profile cases of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church have highlighted the pervasive potential of religious groups to be affected by behaviour understood as sexual abuse. This is a problem not confined to any particular religious context.

The dynamics of sexual exploitation of minors have now been well explored and safeguarding frameworks are becoming more standard. Are there lessons that can be learned from working with children which can be applied to situations involving adults?

In many cases abuse appears to be incidental to the theological and ethical frameworks; in other cases, the sexual activity has explicit justification within a belief framework that is later framed as abuse by outsiders or ‘survivors.’

Does the framing of the behaviour make a difference for understanding the harm caused? To what extent are concepts like ‘spiritual abuse’, ‘fraud’ or ‘moral injury’ helpful in understanding the dynamics of adult sexual abuse in religious contexts?

This online Inform seminar will consider the issue of sexual abuse occurring within religious contexts in hopes of identifying new ways of considering the problem and potential ways of mitigating harm. There will be a series of short presentations by speakers, followed by informed responses and then a general discussion.

 Confirmed speakers and respondents include: 

  • Eileen Barker, professor emeritus of sociology with special reference to the study of religion, London School of Economics
  • Leethen Bartholomew, head of the National FGM Centre at Barnardo’s
  • Amanda Lucia, associate professor, University of California-Riverside, USA
  • Gordon Lynch, Michael Ramsey professor of modern theology at the University of Kent
  • Lisa Oakley, associate professor of applied psychology at University of Chester and chair of National Working Group for child abuse linked to faith or belief
  • Michelle Tonkin, Rigpa whistle-blower and former Buddhist nun
  • Theo Wildcroft, visiting fellow, The Open University and alt-ac.uk
  • Belinda Winder, professor of Forensic Psychology at specialist sexual crime unit at Nottingham Trent University
  • Linda Woodhead, distinguished professor, department of politics, philosophy and religion, University of Lancaster

In the organisation of this seminar, we are grateful for the support of the Religion and Sexual Abuse Project, funded in part by the Henry Luce Foundation.

The event will be officially recorded by Inform. Guests may NOT record, film or take screenshots of the seminar without prior permission.

We hope that some of you can make the event! 

Call for Papers: The Sacred and The…Profanity – Online Symposium

8th September 2020

To submit a proposal, please send an abstract of approximately 200 words to: Dr Paul Martin: paul.s.martin@bristol.ac.uk and Nicole Graham: ng338@kent.ac.uk by 15th July 2020.

Building on the recent growth of scholarship in the field of humour and religion, this interdisciplinary online symposium aims to bring together scholars from a wide range of fields to explore the multifaceted relationship between humour, obscenity, and religion, and to consider what happens when these worlds collide.

There are many examples that seem to support the view that religion and humour have a tense relationship; whether it be ‘comic’ representations of religious figures in the media, jokes about God, or films and television which focus on religion and morality that are considered blasphemous or offensive. These occurrences are often enthusiastically cast as a conflict between religious freedom and the right to dignity in belief, on the one hand, and freedom of expression and the right to offend, on the other. However, the intersection of humour, obscenity, and religion is much more complex than this, and this symposium invites participants to work through various aspects of this relationship. Of particular interest is the place of humour and the obscene in religion, the positive functions it can serve and ultimately its value. We want to ask: what role can humour play in the sphere of religion, and how comfortably? Even if joking might be allowed, can it ever truly fit in? Who decides on the value of humour for religion?

We welcome submissions which consider these, and other, questions in relation to a number of topics including, but not limited to:

  • Historical or contemporary examples of humour or obscenity in religion
  • Gendered experiences of laughter, humour, and joke-telling
  • Ritual
  • Joke-telling
  • Satire
  • The Media
  • Blasphemy
  • The usefulness of humour and the obscene
  • Limits of humour
  • The policing of humour

In addition to the panel of papers, the symposium will include a round table entitled: “Exploring Religion and Ritual in Humour and the Obscene”. Confirmed speakers for this round table are: Professor Bernard Schweizer (Co-Founder of the Humour and Religion Network), Dr Emily Selove (Senior Lecturer of Medieval Arabic Language and Literature), Dr Lieke Stelling (Assistant Professor in English Literature), and Dr Simon Weaver (Senior Lecturer in Media and Communications).

We welcome papers that address one of these themes in a 15-minute talk. The organisers will review all submissions anonymously.

All papers will be presented remotely and observed online. Each talk will be followed by a discussion.

Centre of Islamic Studies: ‘Muslims in the UK and Europe’ symposium for 2020 has been cancelled

University of Cambridge’s Centre of Islamic Studies ‘Muslims in the UK and Europe’ symposium for 2020 has been cancelled

It is with regret that we can confirm that this year’s ‘Muslims in the UK and Europe’ symposium has been cancelled. We had explored the possibility of taking it online but felt that the benefits of the symposium came largely from the professional and personal relationships formed at the event which would not be possible in an online setting. We hope to announce the ‘MUKE’ 2021 event at the start of next year – pandemic permitting.

Kind regards from the CIS team

Centre of Islamic Studies

University of Cambridge

Australian Association of Buddhist Studies (AABS) – June Seminar

The AABS will be hosting an online seminar via Zoom on 4 June from 6:30pm to 7:30pm (Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney time). To join the seminar from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android, click the following link:

https://uni-sydney.zoom.us/j/91798936739

Please mute your microphone when joining Zoom.

Kind regards,
AABS Executive

Buddhist Tantric Poetry: Frameworks and Practices

The genre of Buddhist tantric poetry, though often misunderstood, has been a fascinating topic for generations of scholars and practitioners alike. Its esoteric and mystic character, poetry peppered with puns and plays, draws on metaphor and analogies as their major mediating tool through which view and intention is clearly paraphrased from within the Buddhist tantric path. Referring to, as it seems, commonly shared yogic practices, this talk will examine the most important literary themes and religious frameworks underlying those practices.

Dr Julian Schott, who has been teaching Sanskrit this semester at the Univerity of Sydney, is a Posdoctoral Research Fellow at the Numata Center for Buddhist Studies (Hamburg University) and at Mahidol University, Thailand. He has studied Sanskrit, South Asian and Buddhist Studies in Göttingen (BA) and Hamburg (MA). He completed his doctoral dissertation within Hamburg’s Collaborative Research Cluster about Manuscript Cultures with a study, edition and translation of Kṛṣṇacaryāpāda’s Dohākoṣa commentaries, which makes him one of the few specialists of tantric poetry written in Apabhraṃśa.

Need help using Zoom? Visit the Zoom Help Center: https://support.zoom.us

Australian Association of Buddhist Studies (AABS) – May Seminar

The AABS will be hosting an online seminar via Zoom on 21 May at 6:30pm (Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney time). To join the seminar from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android, click the following link:

https://uni-sydney.zoom.us/j/92717393831

Intention in Karmaphala from the Vaibhāṣika View According to the Eighth and the Ninth Karmapa’s Abhidharmakośa Commentaries

Intention appears to be a significant element in karmaphala (“result of action”) according to Buddhist thought in general, and particularly in many Tibetan traditions. However, in addition to intention, other dimensions of action also deserve attention with regard to their role in a completed action. This talk analyses and compares the significance of intention and other dimension of action from the Abhidharmakośa commentaries of the Eighth and the Ninth Karmapa, masters, who lived in a time of crucial scholarly developments. This talk argues that these aspects are equally important in an action according to the Vaibhāṣika point of view. It shows that––according to those commentators––in Vaibhāṣika thought the actual action and other dimensions of action are indispensable along with intention to complete an action.  

Dorjee Wangdi is a postgraduate researcher (MPhil) in Asian Studies at the University of Sydney. Focusing on karmaphala, he investigates the Karma chapter of the Abhidharmakośa commentaries by two Tibetan scholar-meditators, the Eighth Karmapa Mikyö Dorje and the Ninth Karmapa Wangchug Dorje. Dorjee has completed a Tibetan monastic education similar to a Masters in Buddhist Philosophy, published various translations and acted as teacher at the Royal University of Bhutan.

SocRel Response Day: Teaching Religion- New Lower Rates

Please note that we have lowered our registration rates for the next SocRel Response Day, Teaching Religion (20/3/2020) at the University of Nottingham with guest speaker, Dr Dawn Llewellyn.

New rates are as follows:

  • BSA Member £5
  • SocRel Member £10
  • Non-member £15

For call for papers, abstract submission and event registration please follow this link: https://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/key-bsa-events/bsa-socrel-chair-s-response-day-teaching-religion/

BSA Socrel Chair’s Response Day: Teaching Religion

20 March 2020 (10am–4pm)

Teaching and Learning Building, Room E06 at the Department of Theology and Religious Studies, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD.

Abstracts should be up to 300 words long.  Submission deadline:  24 February 2020.

Event Site

Speaker: Dr Dawn Llewellyn, University of Chester

Dr Llewellyn is Senior Lecturer in Christian Studies at the University of Chester and author of Reading, Feminism, and Spirituality (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015). She is a longtime member of Socrel and the current holder of the Teaching and Learning Fellowship awarded by the British Association for the Study of Religions (BASR). Her presentation will take the form of an interactive workshop, designed as an opportunity to share good practice around building learning communities in the study of religion. 

About the Event

This one-day event will gather new ideas, experiences and critiques of the current state of the teaching of religion in the UK and internationally. We will focus primarily on the challenge of teaching the sociological study of religion to undergraduate and graduate students, but we welcome teachers working in any discipline that shares an interest in religion-related topics. Teachers working outside university contexts are also welcome, from those working on knowledge exchange and public education projects to religious educators working in schools.

Possible topics for discussion include (but are not limited to):

  • Radical teaching for the study of religion.
  • Decolonizing the religious studies curriculum.
  • Teaching beyond World Religions.
  • Teaching on strike: teach-outs, picket lines and student responses.
  • Supporting students from diverse backgrounds in the classroom.
  • Positive and negative student experiences of religion on campus.
  • Building a learning community in a TRS department.
  • Students as researchers and teachers.
  • Teaching outside the university.
  • Key factors influencing the status of the sociology of religion within the university.
  • Distance, online and blended learning in the study of religion.
  • Teaching digital skills, using digital resources and employing digital technologies.
  • Training students for the future workplace.

We will also offer time to workshop module ideas, classroom challenges and plans for new activities in small group conversations.

We welcome all papers that enable scholarly reflection on the future shape of pedagogy. Each paper should last 20 minutes, and an additional 10 minutes will be allotted for questions. Proposals for alternative styles of presentation are encouraged.

Contact the Organisers

Registration

Bookings are now OPEN.

BSA Member£36
SocRel Member£41
Non-Member£46
BSA Concessionary Member£15
SocRel Concessionary Member£20
Full-time Student Non-member£25

News: ISAGRAM issue 181, February 2020

Original Site

CONFERENCES

Seventh Annual Conference on the History of
Recent Social Science

Institute for the History and Philosophy of
Science and Technology,
University of Toronto, Canada
June 12-13, 2020
Abstracts: February 7, 2020

Heated Identities: Differences, Belonging, and
Populisms in an Effervescent World

XI Portuguese Congress of Sociology
Lisbon, June 29-July 1, 2020
Abstracts: February 13, 2020

Immigration Politics, Refugee Crises, and Ethnic
Dynamics in the Turbulent 2010s: Canada and
Beyond

Canadian Ethnic Studies Association
Saint Mary’s University, Canada
October 16-17, 2020
Abstracts: February 15, 2020

What People Leave Behind: Marks, Traces,
Footprints and their Significance for Social
Sciences

Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
June 15-16, 2020
Abstracts: February 15, 2020

Living in a World of Nation States

Institute of Sociology of the Russian
Academy of Sciences
Moscow, Russia
April 15-16, 2020
Abstracts: February 28, 2020

PUBLICATIONS

Bandits, Brigands, and Militants: The Historical
Sociology of Outlaws

Call for papers
Special issue of Journal of Historical Sociology
Abstracts: February 15, 2020

 Childhoods at the Core of Research
Call for papers
Special issue of Sociedad e Infancias
Abstracts: February 15, 2020

Systemics and Complexity Theories
Call for papers
Special issue of World Complexity Science
Academy Journal

Submissions: February 20, 2020

Social Farming for Social Innovation and
Viability in Rural Areas

Call for papers
Special issue of Sustainability
Submissions: February 29, 2020

 Handbook on the Circulation of Academic
Knowledge

Call for contributions
Submissions: March 31, 2020

PRIZE

Norbert Elias Book Prize 2020
Norbert Elias Foundation
Nominations: April 30, 2020

VIII ISA Worldwide Competition for Junior
Sociologists

International Sociological Association
Nominations: March 31, 2021

FELLOWSHIPS

International Postdoctoral Program
Brazilian Center for Analysis and Planning
Applications: February 28, 2020

 7 Doctoral Researcher Positions in Research
Training Group

Bremen International Graduate School of Social
Sciences, Germany
Applications: February 29, 2020

The Ethel Louise Armstrong Post-Doctoral
Fellowship in Disability Studies

Ryerson University, Canada
Applications: March 1, 2020

Tanis Doe Postdoctoral Fellow in Gender,
Disability and Social Justice

Ryerson University, Canada
Applications: March 1, 2020
JOB OPENINGS

2 Doctoral Studentships in Sociology
Södertörn University
Stockholm, Sweden
Applications: February 17, 2020

 Senior Researcher in the Area of Economic
Sociology

Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies
Applications: February 28, 2020

Conference: Blasphemy and Violence. Interdependencies since 1760

There is no registration fee.

If you wish to attend, please register via mail: inschrijven@liberas.eu.

Please indicate in your mail whether you will attend the keynote lecture (in French) on Wednesday evening and/or the conference on Thursday.

Venue:
Liberas, Conference room
Kramersplein 23
9000 Ghent

Convenors:

  • David Nash
  • Eveline Bouwers

Organisation:

  • Christoph De Spiegeleer

On the 5th of March 2020, Liberas (Ghent, Belgium), in conjunction with the School of History, Religion and Philosophy at Oxford Brookes University (Oxford, United Kingdom) and the Leibniz Institute of European History (Mainz, Germany), organises an international colloquium devoted to the interdependency between blasphemy and violence in modern history. This international colloquium offers a much needed analysis of a subject that historians have largely neglected, yet holds great relevance for contemporary society. Both young and established scholars will focus on specific incidents of blasphemy and sacrilege – a landmark case or a series of little-known micro studies –, examine its relationship with violence and discuss the legal background and context surrounding each incident. Drawing on a variety of chronological and geographical contexts, the colloquium will probe the phenomenon of blasphemy and its link to violence from different angles. All presentations will be given in English. The eve preceding the conference (4 March), internationally renowned expert Alain Cabantous will give a keynote lecture in French on blasphemy and sacrilege during the French Revolution.

Info at: www.blasphemyviolence2020.be