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PhD Scholarship Funding

An ESRC funded PhD studentship is now available for a project that researches Muslim women in higher education institutions in Britain. The project is jointly supervised by Dr Khursheed Wadia (Warwick University)  and Line Nyhagen (Loughborough University). The application deadline is Friday, March 5th, 2021.

The announcement for this position can be found at: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/cross_fac/mgsdtp/collaborativeandjoint/#joint

Call for Sessions & Papers: Association for the Sociology of Religion, August 2021

82nd Annual Meeting of the Association for the Sociology of Religion

Call for Sessions and Papers

Theme: “Communicating Religion’s Relevance”

Location: A specially designed virtual conference platform (see note 1 below)
Dates: 3 days between August 7 – August 10 (see note 2 below)
Program Chair: Brian Starks, Kennesaw State University (starksasr@gmail.com)

Although scholars of religion are keenly aware of the relevance of religion in today’s world, too many social elites and academics diminish religion’s importance. Even scholars who know better sometimes fail to explain how religion permeates nearly every aspect of contemporary life. As sociologists of religion, we understand religion’s relevance to individuals and its consequences in the social, cultural, political, and economic spheres. This year’s conference invites scholars to reflect on religion’s continuing – and in some areas increasing – relevance to society.

We invite session and paper proposals on several key topics:

  • · What can sociologists of religion do to communicate religion’s relevance to their (our) fellow academics and to the broader public?
  • · Are there ways that various sectors of our society have misunderstood, or failed to fully understand, religion? How can sociologists of religion speak to this problem?
  • · How do social and political elites, as well as ordinary citizens, employ religion when communicating about, or working to address, issues of local, national, or international concern?
  • · How do social actors, including social movement leaders, draw upon religion and religious narratives to frame social problems and/or appeal to human cognition, emotion, and morality?
  • · What are religion’s unique features that distinguish it from other social phenomenon and help explain its distinct capacity to influence human and social life?
  • · How, and under what circumstances, does religion contribute to new forms of identity, community, meaning, expression, moral conviction, and social control? How do we, as sociologists of religion, communicate religion’s relevance in these facets of our lives, to others?

Paper and session proposals may speak to these themes, or they may engage with any topic relevant to the sociology of religion. We especially encourage proposals that pursue and stimulate new avenues of research and/or innovative theoretical and/or methodological approaches. Specialty sessions are also welcome, including book salons, teaching and professional development, and discussions that focus on a particular question of interest.

We are very excited about our upcoming conference and the opportunities it will provide for intellectual interchange. Indeed, if people are interested in developing and structuring sessions in an especially creative manner, we are open to different (but feasible) approaches. Please email Program Chair Brian Starks starksasr@gmail.com) to discuss any ideas you have and how we might accommodate them.

DEADLINES

  • Session proposals: March 31, 2021
  • Paper abstract submissions: April 30, 2021
  • All submissions should be made through the ASR website at www.sociologyofreligion.com

ASR Membership is required for organizing a session, presenting a paper, serving as a panelist, or holding another role in the program. All are expected to register for the meeting by July 1, 2021. For questions, contact Brian Starks (starksasr@gmail.com), James Cavendish (jcavendi@usf.edu), or Rachel Kraus (ASREO@bsu.edu).

Note 1: Because of the pandemic, our meeting this year will be a virtual conference. We have been working hard to design a stimulating experience that allows the intellectual interchange, the networking, and the chance to catch up with old and new friends that make our in-person conferences so enjoyable.

I am happy to report that we will be using a major platform with previous experience running other academic conferences. This platform organizes all sessions into a single attractive, easy-to-access online hall. The platform will also host our major plenary sessions and allow publishers to hold virtual book exhibits. To this, we are excited to be incorporating a virtual café that will remain open throughout the conference. This will allow private conversations and will let people meet and network easily with other participants during the conference at any time.

Our goal is to have each session include not only a traditional facilitator, but also a technological convener who could help individual participants with any technology related issues or questions. This will allow facilitators to focus on time-keeping and substantive conversation, as they usually do. Towards that end, if there are grad students or others interested in earning a little extra money by serving as technological conveners for several sessions, please email me at starksasr@gmail.com.

Note 2: We do not yet know our exact dates, as we are still waiting for the ASA to confirm the date of the Religion Section’s session. We want to avoid overlapping with them, so people can participate in both conferences. We simply ask you to keep August 7-10 open in your schedules. We will let you know exact dates as soon as we can.

AASR October Newsletter

The Call for Paper for the 45th Annual Conference of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion (AASR) is now open. Submission for abstracts is open till 31 October 2020. We strongly encourage postgraduate students to participate (free registration). Please check out our website for more information. We look forward to seeing you there.

Call for Papers:

Conferences
36th ISSR/SISR ‘Religion in Global/Local Perspectives: Diffusion, Migration, Transformation’ Conference, 12-15 July 2021, Taipei, Taiwan. Call for sessions: 15 July to 15 September 2020. Call for papers: 1 October to 15 November 2020. More info
Center for Critical Research on Religion and Queens University Belfast, conference on “Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion”, 11-14 June 2021. Proposal deadline 15 January 2021. More info
.3rd ANU Religion Conference – Religion and Migration: Culture and Policy. Canberra, 8-10 ecember 2021. Proposal deadline 21 May 2021. More info 

Publications
Call for papers for the International Journal for the Study of New Religions
Call for papers on Religions’ special issue: ‘Religion, Law and Politics‘. Deadline 18 December 2020. Call for paper for a thematic issue of Religion: Emic Categories and New Paths / Case Studies in the Scholarly Use of Indigenous Concepts (working title). Deadline Feb 2021. 
Call for papers: Special Issue on “Historizing Islamophobia”. Deadline February 2021. 

Latest Publications:
Faber, Roland (2019), Ocean of God: On the Transreligious Future of Religions. Anthem Press.
Foroutan, Yaghoob (2020), Ethnic or Religious Identities?: Multicultural Analysis in Australia from Socio-Demographic PerspectiveJournal of Ethnic and Cultural Studies, 7 (1): 1-19.
Kim, David (2020), Daesoon Jinrihoe in Modern Korea: The Emergence, Transformation and Transmission of a New Religion. Newcastle, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 

Call for chapters: The lived religious lives of women in 21st century Britain

Dr Rachael Shillitoe is putting out a call for papers for a book on the lived religious lives of women in 21st century Britain. The term lived religion is being described as the ways in which religion is practiced and applied in everyday lives. This may or may not include worship in a religious setting and can be formal or informal.

This topic will be examined across religions and religious denominations. This can include atheism, spirituality, humanism etc. This may include topics such as:

  • Food
  • Clothing
  • Prayer
  • Female Ordination
  • Navigating the patriarchy in conservative religious denominations
  • Ritual
  • Women only religious spaces
  • Solidarity and support through religion
  • Family worship and religious observation

Chapter lengths should be around 6000 – 8000 words.

Please submit an abstract no longer than 500 words by September 30th 2020 to:

Yvonne Bennett y.bennett49@canterbury.ac.uk<mailto:y.bennett49@canterbury.ac.uk>
Canterbury Christ Church University

The book has been commissioned by Vernon Press.

Call for Paper Proposals: Religion and the Coronavirus Pandemic

The Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature, and Culture (JSRNC) is calling for paper proposals exploring the entanglements of religion, the Coronavirus, and socioecological (aka biocultural) systems.

We seek scholarly work that explores how the virus, and religious dimensions of the response to it are influencing, and may decisively reshape socioecological systems, including religious perceptions and practices.

Pandemics are nothing new in human and religious history, of course. Indeed, religion and disease have long been entwined as people struggled to understand the mysterious origins of diseases and why they sometimes cause mass deaths and concomitant social and ecological disasters. Unsurprisingly, invisible spiritual beings or forces, which influence if not control environmental conditions, have often been postulated to explain the invisible-to-the-naked eye organisms that precipitate diseases and disasters. Some theorists even contend that the roots of religion may lie in the existential crises precipitated by disease and death.

Although the history of religion is replete with examples in which disease has played an important role, there may be novelty in the current pandemic and fresh insights about the diversity of religion-related responses to it. Indeed, if apocalypse means the end of the world as we know it, the current pandemic may well precipitate profound, destructive changes.

Yet as with much apocalyptic expectation, perhaps after its tribulations new and positive ways of being in the world will emerge that were previously hidden from human imaginations – or only envisioned by previously marginalized individuals and groups.

We have provided examples of social phenomena and specific questions that we think would be fitting for analysis under the heading “Further Information for Interested Scholars” at our web-based CFP: https://issrnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Coronavirus-Special-CFP_JSRNC.pdf

By 15 June 2020 interested scholars should send prospective titles, a summary of the proposed paper (300-500 words), and ideally, relevant references, to JSRNC Managing Editor Amanda Nichols via amnv22@ufl.edu. Papers will be due 1 October 2020. All manuscripts will undergo the JSRNC’s full editorial review process, including double-blind peer review, before publication. Those requiring a later due date should discuss that with JSRNC Editor-in-Chief Bron Taylor via bron@ufl.edu.

CFP: Religion and the Coronavirus Pandemic

Call for Paper Proposals, Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature, and Culture.  Proposals due June 15, 2020

A PDF of the full CFP is available via bit.ly/CV19pdf and via the website of the International Society for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture at bit.ly/CV19cfp

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Short précis

The Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature, and Culture (JSRNC) is calling for paper proposals exploring the entanglements of religion, the Coronavirus, and socioecological (aka biocultural) systems. We seek scholarly work that explores how the virus, and religious dimensions of the response to it are influencing, and may decisively reshape socioecological systems, including religious perceptions and practices.

Pandemics are nothing new in human and religious history, of course. Indeed, religion and disease have long been entwined as people struggled to understand the mysterious origins of diseases and why they sometimes cause mass deaths and concomitant social and ecological disasters. Unsurprisingly, invisible spiritual beings or forces, which influence if not control environmental conditions, have often been postulated to explain the invisible-to-the-naked eye organisms that precipitate diseases and disasters. Some theorists even contend that the roots of religion may lie in the existential crises precipitated by disease and death.

Although the history of religion is replete with examples in which disease has played an important role, there may be novelty in the current pandemic and fresh insights about the diversity of religion-related responses to it. Indeed, if apocalypse means the end of the world as we know it, the current pandemic may well precipitate profound, destructive changes. Yet as with much apocalyptic expectation, perhaps after its tribulations new and positive ways of being in the world will emerge that were previously hidden from human imaginations – or only envisioned by previously marginalized individuals and groups.

Given the interdisciplinary nature of the JSRNC please share this CFP in all relevant scholarly networks


Journal of Law and Religion -New volume published online

Free to read without a subscription until February 15!

Journal of Law and ReligionVolume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019

Published Online January 2020
Editorial:
EDITORIAL
Michael J. Perry, Silas W. Allard
Journal of Law and Religion, Volume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019, pp 133 – 135
doi: 10.1017/jlr.2019.35 Published Online on 5 August 2019
Research article:
BIBLICAL LAW IN GRECO-ROMAN ATTIRE: THE CASE OF LEVIRATE MARRIAGE IN LATE ANTIQUE CHRISTIAN LEGAL TRADITIONS
Yifat Monnickendam
Journal of Law and Religion, Volume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019, pp 136 – 164
doi: 10.1017/jlr.2018.40 Published Online on 2 January 2020
ON BLOOD, POWER, AND PUBLIC INTEREST: THE CONCEALMENT OF HINDU SACRIFICIAL RITES UNDER INDIAN LAW
Deonnie Moodie
Journal of Law and Religion, Volume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019, pp 165 – 182
doi: 10.1017/jlr.2019.24 Published Online on 14 August 2019
RECONCILING JOHN MILBANK AND RELIGIOUS FREEDOM: “LIBERALISM” THROUGH LOVE
Alex Deagon
Journal of Law and Religion, Volume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019, pp 183 – 209
doi: 10.1017/jlr.2019.27 Published Online on 1 August 2019
SAME-SEX RELATIONS AND THE CATHOLIC CHURCH: HOW LAW AND DOCTRINE HAVE EVOLVED, 1820–2020
Charles J. Reid
Journal of Law and Religion, Volume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019, pp 210 – 244
doi: 10.1017/jlr.2019.32 Published Online on 2 January 2020
Book review:
Modern Challenges to Islamic Law. By Shaheen Sardar Ali. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016. Pp. 324. $41.99 (paper). ISBN: 9781107639096.
Muhammad Zubair Abbasi
Journal of Law and Religion, Volume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019, pp 245 – 249
doi: 10.1017/jlr.2019.25 Published Online on 4 September 2019
Religious Secularity: A Theological Challenge to the Islamic State. By Naser Ghobadzadeh. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 288. $31.95 (paper). ISBN: 9780190664893.
Rushain Abbasi
Journal of Law and Religion, Volume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019, pp 250 – 254
doi: 10.1017/jlr.2019.26 Published Online on 5 August 2019
Migrants and Citizens: Justice and Responsibility in the Ethics of Immigration. By Tisha M. Rajendra. Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans, 2017. Pp. 179. $25.00 (paper). ISBN: 9780802868824.
Olga Kazmina
Journal of Law and Religion, Volume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019, pp 255 – 258
doi: 10.1017/jlr.2019.28 Published Online on 5 August 2019
From Maimonides to Microsoft: The Jewish Law of Copyright since the Birth of Print. By Neil Weinstock Netanel. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. 336. $29.95 (paper). ISBN 9780190868772.
George Y. Kohler
Journal of Law and Religion, Volume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019, pp 259 – 261
doi: 10.1017/jlr.2019.29 Published Online on 27 August 2019
Jewish Law and American Law: A Comparative Study. By Samuel J. Levine. New York: Touro College Press, 2018. Vol. 1, Pp. 384. $109 (cloth). ISBN: 9781618116550. Vol. 2, Pp. 238. $109 (cloth). ISBN: 9781618116574.
Shlomo C. Pill
Journal of Law and Religion, Volume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019, pp 262 – 265
doi: 10.1017/jlr.2019.30 Published Online on 12 September 2019
Halakhah: The Rabbinic Idea of Law. By Chaim N. Saiman. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018. Pp. 320. $29.95 (cloth). ISBN: 9780691152110.
Don Seeman
Journal of Law and Religion, Volume 34 / Issue 2, August 2019, pp 266 – 268
doi: 10.1017/jlr.2019.31 Published Online on 4 September 2019

CFP: Special issue on Religion & Ecology

Call for Papers: A special issue of the journal Religions on Religion & Ecology.  The Special Issue aims to assess the current explanations for the role of religion in addressing climate change and offer new analyses about religion and climate change from the perspectives of social sciences and humanities.

As the pace and intensity of climate changes increases, so too does the peril it poses to earth and all who live in it. Many religions follow an ethic of caring for those most strongly impacted by the effects of events like climate change and bear the moral legitimacy to mobilize millions to act in order to ameliorate climate change. Historically, many religions have been silent, indifferent, and even hostile to environmentalism, but over the past 25 years, religious communities and organizations have developed green theologies, ethics, and rituals, and have spoken prophetically in defense of nature. But how effective have religions been in mobilization action and persuading individuals, communities, and governments to take action against climate change?

The purpose of this Special Issue is to assess the current state of religious involvement to address climate change and the effects we are already experiencing. What are religions actively doing to combat climate change and has it made a difference? What are the limits on religions’ involvement in and work towards climate justice? Why have some religions taken action to combat climate change while others refuse to engage? The issue will be comparative in scope on several dimensions: From local religious congregations to national bodies; from religions of the book to dark green and eco-spirituality communities; from the developed west to the developing south. Contributions from a variety of disciplines that focus on assessing and explaining the role of religions in addressing climate change are welcome.

Stephen Ellingson Guest Editor
Professor and Chair
Department of Sociology
Hamilton College
198 College Hill Road
Clinton, NY 13323
sellings@hamilton.edu

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page.Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charges (APCs) of 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs) per published paper are partially funded by institutions through Knowledge Unlatched for a limited number of papers per year. Please contact the editorial office before submission to check whether KU waivers, or discounts are still available. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • · religion and the environment
  • · climate change
  • · climate justice
  • · green religion
  • · ecopolitics
  • · environmental ethics

ISA-RC22 Call for Papers

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RESEARCH COMMITTEE 22: SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION
Call for Abstracts
“Challenges of the 21st century for sociology of religion”

Program Coordinators:

  • Eloísa Martín, United Arab Emirates University, UAE
  • Juan Cruz Esquivel, University of Buenos Aires/ CONICET, Argentina
  • Roberta Bivar Carneiro, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil

The debate on religion, its role, its development, and its future has been intense, extensive and sophisticated during the last few decades. Religion is both a central phenomenon itself and a key variable that can be used to explain economic, social, and political phenomena. Both facets require continuous in-depth research. In recent years, many sociologists have begun to identify limits to the current approach to religious phenomena, and especially to the definitions of religion developed in the West. A number of authors have extended this critique to the ways sociologists currently explain and interpret “religion” in the 21st Century. Though still emerging, such accounts have opened new paths by which sociologists of religion can face both the empirical and theoretical challenges of our era.

We invite abstracts for the following sessions:

We will also be including the following invited sessions in our RC22 program:

The ISA CONFEX website is now open for abstract submissions from April 25 – September 30, 2019 24:00 GMT. Abstracts may only be submitted through the CONFEX site. Programme coordinators cannot include abstracts sent by email or include abstracts submitted after the CONFEX system is closed.

Go to https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/cfp.cgi to enter the CONFEX site and click on Begin a Submission. Abstracts must be submitted in English, French or Spanish.

A person may be listed in the Program:
•    up to 2 times as author or co-author (oral or poster presentation, distributed paper, roundtable presenter)
•    up to 2 times as chair or co-chair, panellist, critic, discussant

To be included in the program the participants (presenters, chairs, discussants, etc.) need to pay full registration fees by March 19, 2020. If not registered, their names will not appear in the Program Book and in the Abstracts Book.

Please address any questions to any of the Program Coordinators: