Category Archives: Workshops

CFP: “Mosques, power and politics” Copenhagen, Denmark 22-24 January 2020

Venue: University of Copenhagen, South Campus
Karen Blixens Plads 8, 2300 Copenhagen, Denmark

For this workshop we address the changing politics of mosque building, the different kinds of conflict surrounding the building of a mosque and the symbolic appropriation of territory by the mosque.

The building of a mosque can be seen as a social transformative interaction and accounts for the many stakeholders involved in the construction of mosques (e.g., Muslim organizations, international donors, local politicians, anti-Islam groups and other critics). As such, the mosques and the politics of construction can be seen as microcosms of the discourse on Muslims in a country.

Concerns with security, extremism and visibility of Muslim institutions in the Nordic and Western European countries are causing “existential” difficulties for mosques. The state criticizes mosques and change the politics of religion with reference to incidents in mosques as in Denmark in 2016-18.

This seminar will examine the power strategies used by national and local politicians, examining national legislation and municipal planning on mosques, and will investigate a number of concrete cases of contested mosque building. The operable questions are:

  • What are the political power dynamics at play in mosque building?
  • Do the mosques challenge the existing models of state-religion-relations?
  • How may mosques present and organize themselves to defuse these tensions of power?

Paper abstracts of 300 words and a short CV to be submitted to Niels Valdemar Vinding, lbm993@hum.ku.dk, on November 15th 2019 at the latest. Read more on: https://mosques.ku.dk/nordic-mosques/

Symposium: *Pentecostal Charismatic Christianities and Migration*

Please join us at the symposium Pentecostal Charismatic Christianities and Migration co-convened by the Religion and Society Research Cluster/SSAP, Western Sydney University, and Alphacrucis College.

Date: 2 August 2019

Venue: Level 9, Parramatta City campus, WSU

169 Macquarie St, Parramatta

Keynote Speaker: Associate Prof Richard Vokes, UWA

“‘The Spirit Really Moved Me’: Metaphors of Movement in African-Australian Conversion Narratives”

Symposium Conveners:

  • Prof Cristina Rocha, Religion and Society Research Cluster, WSU
  • Prof Mark Hutchinson, Alphacrucis College
  • Dr Kathleen Openshaw, Religion and Society Research Cluster, WSU
  • Mrs Ingrid Ryan, Alphacrucis College

Symposium Theme

Over the past few decades, Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity (PCC) has exploded in the Global South and grown considerably in the Global North. Much of this grow this fuelled by networks of megachurches, the mobility of community leaders across diasporic networks, migration and media. While traditionally missionaries would travel in a North-to- South direction, more recently megachurches from the Global South have moved horizontally, across to other developing countries, and also made inroads in to the Global North in efforts of reverse missionisation. Such attempts to missionise to locals in the Global North have been largely (though not wholly) unsuccessful and churches have turned their focus to migrants from the Global South. Many studies have shown that migrants, who were not attached to PCCs before migration, join churches in the diaspora as they offer them a home away from home. Meanwhile, diasporic churches also face difficulties keeping these (as well as second generation) migrants, since they may prefer local churches in an effort to integrate. This symposium will probe these themes, discussing the many connections between PCCs and migration.

Registration: This is a free event but registration needed for catering purposes.

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/pentecostal-and-charismatic-christianity-and- migration-symposium-tickets-64954862743

For more details see attached flyer and  https://pccinaussymposium.wordpress.com/

GENDER, RELIGION AND SEXUALITY SYMPOSIUM

This is an invitation to HDR students and Early Career Academics researching in the interdisciplinary fields of religion, gender and sexuality to attend a one day symposium on:

Saturday, 29 June 2019
at the University of Newcastle Sydney CBD campus
55 Elizabeth St, Sydney
** Register your interest by 21 June 2019!


This one-day symposium brings together postgraduate students and early career researchers working in the interdisciplinary area of religion, gender and sexuality to explore specific issues pertaining to study in this area.

Masterclass 1 (9.30-1pm) Methodological and Ethical Issues in the Study of Religion, Gender and Sexuality

Leaders: Professor Emma Tomalin, University of Leads; Dr Luke Gahan, La Trobe University

This masterclass will explore interdisciplinary approaches to and methodologies in the study of religion, gender and sexuality. The first session will look at the theory of intersectionality when applied to the research and analysis of religion, gender and sexuality in non-western societies. The second session will look at methods and ethics in researching LGBTQI cohorts and issues. Participants will be encouraged to draw on insights from their own research in order to contribute to the discussion, and there will be a pre-symposium reading requirement.

Masterclass 2 (2.00-3.30) Safety in the Research Process

Leader: Dr Kathleen McPhillips, University of Newcastle

Researching across gender issues in the study of religion can expose us to challenging and difficult literature and field sites for which understanding and preparation is essential. This Masterclass will explore some of the pitfalls in the research process, the importance of setting up a safe research environment for participants and researchers and the importance of self-care. The class will introduce a trauma informed model of research practice and will draw upon the expertise of a number of experienced researchers, early career researchers and current HDR students who have worked in challenging research areas. Participants will be invited to share their experiences and there will be a pre-symposium reading requirement.

Discussion (4-5pm)

A final session will address the importance of mentoring for HDR and early career researchers as well as helpful tips about the move from post graduate student to researcher and academic.


This event is fully catered for and morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea is provided.

Registration Costs:

  • HDR Students                                                              $40
  • Early Career Researchers and part-time academics  $50

  • Full time Academics                                                    $100

Please use this link for registration and payment. Deadline: Friday, 21 June 2019.

For more information if required, please email Dr Kathleen McPhillips Kathleen.mcphillips@newcastle.edu.au


Sponsored by:

Introduction to Islamic Codicology

We are once again collaborating  with the Islamic Manuscript Association’s Introduction to Islamic Codicology course on 23–27 September 2019 at Cambridge University Library, Cambridge.

This intensive five-day course will introduce the study of Islamic manuscript codices as physical objects, or the archaeology of the Islamic book. The lectures will provide an overview of writing supports, the structure of quires, ruling and page layout, bookbinding, ornamentation, tools and materials used in book making, the palaeography of book hands, and writing Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) manuscript descriptions. During hands-on sessions, participants will examine Islamic manuscripts from Cambridge University Library’s collections and complete a series of practical exercises on codicological description.

If you are interested then please contact the Association or apply via their website.

Regards
Neil Cunningham
Programmes Manager
Centre of Islamic Studies
University of Cambridge

Symposium/Masterclass on Research on Religion, Gender, and Sexuality

Saturday 29 June 2019
At The University Of Newcastle Sydney Cbd Campus
55 Elizabeth St
Sydney

This one-day symposium brings together postgraduate students and early career researchers working in the interdisciplinary area of religion, gender and sexuality to explore specific issues pertaining to study in this area.

Masterclass 1 (9.30-1pm) Methodological and Ethical Issues in the Study of Religion, Gender and Sexuality
Leaders: Professor Emma Tomalin, University of Leeds; Dr Luke Gahan, La Trobe University

  • This masterclass will explore interdisciplinary approaches to and methodologies in the study of religion, gender and sexuality. The first session will look at the theory of intersectionality when applied to the research and analysis of religion, gender and sexuality in non-western societies. The second session will look at methods and ethics in researching LGBTQI cohorts and issues. Participants will be encouraged to draw on insights from their own research in order to contribute to the discussion, and there will be a pre-symposium reading requirement.

Masterclass 2 (2.00-3.30) Safety in the Research Process
Leader: Dr Kathleen McPhillips, University of Newcastle

  • Researching across gender issues in the study of religion can expose us to challenging and difficult literature and field sites for which understanding and preparation is essential. This Masterclass will explore some of the pitfalls in the research process, the importance of setting up a safe research environment for participants and researchers and the importance of self-care. The class will introduce a trauma informed model of research practice and will draw upon the expertise of a number of experienced researchers, early career researchers and current HDR students who have worked in challenging research areas. Participants will be invited to share their experiences and there will be a pre-symposium reading requirement.

Discussion (4-5pm)

  • A final session will address the importance of mentoring for HDR and early career researchers as well as helpful tips about the move from post graduate student to researcher and academic.
    This event is fully catered for and morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea is provided.

Registration Costs:

  • HDR Students $40
  • Early Career Researchers and part-time academics $50
  • Full time Academics $100

To Register and pay, go to https://www.aasr.org.au/2019-gender-religion-sexuality-symposium

Sponsored By:

  • The Women’s Caucus Of The Australian Association For The Study Of Religion
  • The School Of Humanities And Social Sciences, University Of Newcastle
  • Religion And Society Research Cluster, Western Sydney University
  • Institute For Ethics And Society, Notre Dame University, Sydney
  • Alfred Deakin Institute, Deakin University, Melbourne

Master Classes for Students/Early Careers Researchers on Gender, Sexuality, & Religion

SATURDAY 29 JUNE 2019 9am-5pm

AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE SYDNEY CBD CAMPUS — 55 Elizabeth St Sydney

A one day symposium for postgraduate students and early career researchers working in the interdisciplinary area of gender, sexuality and religion, to explore specific issues pertaining to study in this area with leading researchers in this field.

Two Masterclasses will address a number of topics in Methodological Issues in the Study of Religion and Gender and Safety in the Research Process.  There will also be a session on mentoring and applying for academic jobs and scholarships.

The symposium is fully catered and has a registration fee of $40.

More information and registration coming soon!

Best regards

Enqi Weng, PhD
Seminar Leader | ALC215 Global Media
Research Fellow | ARC DP ‘Religious diversity in Australia: Strategies to maintain social cohesion’

e: enqi.weng@deakin.edu.au

Apply for Generations in Dialogue about the Sociology of Religion

The Institute for Advanced Catholic Studies at the University of Southern California (USC) is seeking applications for its Generations in Dialogue (GID) program about the Sociology of Religion.

The GID program involves a widely-recognized senior Catholic scholar sharing his or her time, expertise, and wisdom with several junior scholars in the same or related disciplines. Over a two-year period these scholars convene for four weekend dialogues that include discipline-specific discussions, personal reflection, shared prayer, and presentations from distinguished scholars and public intellectuals.  Besides benefitting from two years of mentorship, junior scholars will establish relationships with other dedicated scholars in their field.

A generous stipend is included. Early-career (pre-tenure and dissertation stage) social scientists are eligible. Applications are welcome from anyone interested in a substantive and critical engagement with Catholicism’s multiple intellectual traditions

For more information and an application:

https://ifacs.com/programs/generations-in-dialogue/

News and Events Reposted from AASR (May/June, 2018)

Here is a set of events, updates, and conferences/calls-for-papers reposted from the website of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion (https://www.aasr.org.au/mayjune/)

Events:

Updates:

Conferences / call for papers:

CFP: International Workshop “Religious Contacts in Early Modern Scandinavia 1500-1750”

The Käte Hamburger Kolleg Dynamics in the History of Religions between Asia and Europe of the Center for Religious Studies (CERES) invites papers to be presented at the international workshop “Religious Contacts in Early Modern Scandinavia 1500-1750” to be held 10-11 October 2018 in Bochum, Germany.

The workshop will bring together scholars of religious studies, history and cultural studies from the Northern countries as well as Baltic States, German-speaking countries and beyond to explore further the multitude of religious contacts on and around the Scandinavian Peninsula and the Baltic in Early Modern Age.

Among others we would like to compare case studies of different religious contacts and how they were executed by the actors involved. The focus will be rather on the situation and effect of religious contact than on a single religious group.

Examples to be discussed are among others:
– indigenous religions’ (Sami, Karelian, Inuits of Greenland) encounters with Lutheranism and/or Pietism,
– adaption and local alignments of, or resistance towards ideas derived from Protestant Reformation,
– encounters of Scandinavian colonists with the religious beliefs practiced by native peoples (of North America, Africa, Asia),
– early encounters between Protestantism and Orthodox Christianity in Finland and the Baltic,
– Jewish communities of and Jewish migration towards the Scandinavia peninsula in Early Modern Times,
– the spread of non-theistic Enlightenment ideas in Scandinavia and the Baltic before 1750.

Each participant is invited to present a paper in English.

The paper shall later be published in the Käte Hamburger Kolleg’s peer reviewed online journal Entangled Religions (https://er.ceres.rub.de/). All costs (travel expenses, accommodation, dining) will be covered by the Käte Hamburger Kolleg.

The Käte Hamburger Kolleg Dynamics in the History of Religions between Asia and Europe is an international research institution directly funded by the German government. It conducts research in the field of religious studies and history of religion that is dedicated to the formation and expansion of religions, the mutual permeation of religious traditions and their densifications into the complex figurations called ‘world religions.’ Find more information here: https://khk.ceres.rub.de/en/

The Käte Hamburger Kolleg welcomes applications including an abstract on the intended paper to be presented (max 1,500 words) and a short notice about the academic affiliation of the applicant. Applications should be submitted electronically to ulf.plessentin@rub.de no later than June 15, 2018.


Call for Papers Understanding urban religion

Call for Papers Understanding urban religion Heritage, public space and governance International Workshop Barcelona, 25-27 October 2018

While sociological research on religion in urban contexts has proliferated in recent years, the city has less frequently been taken explicitly as a relevant dimension in the study of religion. Historically, social scientists considered cities as the epitome of secularization, and predicted that processes of secularization would diminish the role of religion in urban life. However, dynamic and vibrant forms of urban religion have emerged in cities across the world in recent years (Becci, Burchardt and Casanova, 2013). Developments such as rising levels of transnational migration and the growth of new religious movements have contributed to the religious revitalization of contemporary cities.

The diversification of urban religious landscapes is documented by a variety of studies (Knott, Krech and Meyer, 2016; Lanz et al., 2016). All over the world, cities are witnessing a proliferation of non-traditional places of worship of several kinds (Martínez-Ariño et al., 2011; Stolz and Monnot, forthcoming). On the one hand, religious communities have begun to adapt to trends of urban change such as sub-urbanization and de-industrialization by establishing places of worship in shopping malls, former industrial warehouses, newly established industrial estates and other commercial zones. On the other hand, and especially in Europe, a rapidly increasing number of traditional church buildings are closed and repurposed as a consequence of dropping membership and resulting financial pressures. Churches are sometimes demolished, but more commonly they are put to new use: they are handed over to other faith communities, converted into lofts or other kinds of commercial property, or into public and civic facilities such as museums, libraries or art spaces. In many cities, the future and the management of religious heritage has been object of debate and controversy. In recent years, there has also been a proliferation of multi-faith and inter-faith places. These are either construed as unified places that remain architecturally neutral and open to believers and practitioners of all persuasions, or contain symbolic and architectural elements of different religious communities (often the so-called Abrahamic faiths, Christianity, Islam and Judaism).

At the same time, cities have turned into sites of religious innovation and have become stages for the performing of religious events and celebrations that are parts of urban consumer cultures and contribute to the construction of urban identities and city images. The density of religious actors in the city fosters processes of religious hybridization, transformation and crossfertilization. This vibrant dynamism becomes a fertile ground for cooperation and exchange, but also for conflict. In this context, the governance of religious diversity gains new saliency at the level of cities (Griera, 2012). Municipal authorities, including political as well as administrative actors, pay increasing attention to religious issues and a multiplicity of policy instruments are in place to govern them (Martínez-Ariño, 2017). In addition, urban religious affairs often become the object of public contestation, and generate media and civil society attention (Griera and Burchardt, 2016; Siemiatycki, 2005; Watson, 2005).

The aim of this workshop is to explore the conditions, forms and consequences of the ways urban religion is revitalized, spatialized and governed in contemporary cities. The general topic of the workshop is organized around three sub-themes: heritage, religious expressions in public space, and governance.

Workshop papers should address one or more of the following themes:

1. Religious heritage. The aim of this thematic focus is to discuss cultural, political and power dynamics associated with religious heritage, and explore its role in contemporary cities.
2. Urban religious expressions. This strand explores public religious expressions such as festivals, parades, public prayers and meditations and aims to understand processes of the eventization of urban religion as well as the challenges these presences pose to cities and their dwellers.
3. Governance. Contributions in this third thematic section will look at different articulations of state-religion regimes and political secularism at the urban level.

Abstracts of no more than 250-300 words should be submitted to j.martinez.arino@rug.nl* by 15 June 2018.

Organisers Paul Bramadat (University of Victoria, Canada) Marian Burchardt (University of Leipzig, Germany) Mar Griera (Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain) Julia Martínez-Ariño (University of Groningen, Netherlands)