Global Islamophobia Roundtable

The Religion and Society Research Centre at the University of Western Sydney invites you to attend a roundtable discussion:

‘Global  Islamophobia’

The decade since 9/11 has seen a decline in liberal tolerance in the West as Muslims have endured increasing levels of repression. This roundtable presents a series of case studies demonstrating the transnational character of Islamophobia, by the authors of the recently published Global Islamophobia: Muslims and Moral Panic in the West (Ashgate, 2012). The authors explore contemporary intercultural conflicts using the concept of moral panic, revitalised for the era of globalisation. Exploring various sites of conflict, Global Islamophobia considers the role played by ‘moral entrepreneurs’ in orchestrating popular xenophobia and in agitating for greater surveillance, policing and cultural regulation of those deemed a threat to the nation’s security or imagined community.

Date:     Wednesday 20 February, 2013

Time:    1:30 PM – 3:00 PM

Venue: UWS Bankstown Campus, Building 3 Room 55, Sydney

Please confirm your attendance to e.garcia@uws.edu.au  by Monday 18 February.

Participants

Scott Poynting was (May 2007-January 2013) Professor in Sociology at Manchester Metropolitan University. He is currently Adjunct Professor in the School of Justice at Queensland University of Technology. He is co-author of On Being Lebanese in Australia: Identity, Racism and the Ethnic Field (LAU Press, Beirut, 2010) and Bin Laden in the Suburbs: Criminalising the Arab Other (Sydney Institute of Criminology, 2004), and co-editor of the recent volumes Counter-Terrorism and State Political Violence (Routledge, 2012),  Global Islamophobia: Muslims and Moral Panic in the West (Ashgate, 2012) and Contemporary State Terrorism: Theory and Practice (Routledge, 2010).

George Morgan is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Humanities and Communication Arts and a member of the Institute for Culture and Society at the University of Western Sydney. George’s current research considers how urban working class and minority (including Aboriginal and Middle Eastern) youth respond to the challenges of finding work and developing vocational aspirations in the ‘creative industries’. His books include (as sole author) Unsettled Places: Aboriginal People and Urbanisation in New South Wales (Wakefield Press, 2006); (as editor – both with Scott Poynting) Outrageous: Moral Panics in Australia (ACYS Press, 2007) and Global Islamophobia (Ashgate, 2012).

Selda Dagistanli is a Lecturer in the School of Social Sciences and Psychology and a member of the Religion and Society Research Centre at the University of Western Sydney. Selda’s overarching research priority is an interrogation of the various ways in which unpopular minorities are morally, politically and culturally marginalised in legal and broader community arenas.

Kevin Dunn is Professor of Geography and Urban Studies and Dean of the School of Social Sciences and Psychology at the University of Western Sydney. Kevin teaches cultural and social geography, migration and urban studies and his areas of research include: immigration and settlement; Islam in Australia; the geographies of racism; and local government and multiculturalism.

Gregory Noble is a Professor at the Institute for Culture and Society at the University of Western Sydney. Greg researches and writes in the intersecting areas of: youth, ethnicity and identity; multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism; material culture and technology; consumption and subjectivity; and cultural analysis of education.

The Roundtable will be moderated by Adam Possamai, Co-Director of the Religion and Society Research Centre.