Ecclesiology and Ethnography Network

Dear EE Friends,
We should be gathering in Durham for our annual conference this week! We are mourning the loss of gathering in person, but in this newsletter you will find opportunity to remain engaged in our network in a variety of ways.
First, you will find links to a podcast series featuring Dr. Pete Ward hosted by Dr. Eileen Campbell-Reed on the E&E website.
And below, you’ll see a book launch from Dr. Clare Watkins and a chance to participate in a lively event through Lived Catholicism.
Although we can’t be together this week we are grateful to extend these resources to you on behalf of our network. Take courage and stay healthy!

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We’re proud to announce the publication of Dr. Clare Watkin’s new book, Disclosing Church: An Ecclesiology Learned from Conversations in Practice. You are invited to the virtual book launch event on Wednesday, 23 September, at 4:00 p.m. (UK), at which you will hear more about the book from Clare and a response by Dr. Jonas Ideström.
Register through Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/book-launch-disclosing-church-by-clare-watkins-tickets-118617410869

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New Book: Religion and Secularity: Reconfiguring Islam in Contemporary India

https://orientblackswan.com/details?id=9789390122004

Authors:

Sudha Sitharaman is Professor, Department of Sociology, Pondicherry University, Puducherry.

Anindita Chakrabarti is Associate Professor of Sociology, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur.

The resurgence of religion and its militant mixing with politics is now a ubiquitous feature of our times. Since 9/11, discussions on religion, particularly Islam, have been characterised by debates surrounding the rise of political Islam, war on terror and the ascent of religious politics globally. Islam, particularly, appears as the bearer of a frightening tradition, and stereotypes render it an anathema in the modern world. The notion of a unitary, timeless and unchanging religion has been reinforced not only by sections of academia and the media, but also through the Muslim communities’ interpretations and representations of their own religion.

Religion and Secularities challenges these quotidian ‘facts’ about Islam. It brings together a collection of essays focusing on the reconfiguration of Islam in the world’s largest democracy, India. Investigating the relationship between religion, civil society and the state, this volume explores the nation’s long history with Islam as well as the categorisation of Muslims as a minority community.

Based on ethnographic studies conducted in different regions of the country—from Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal to Karnataka and Kerala—this volume addresses the diverse issues of religious piety that include community activism and civic participation; disputes and debates around visitation to historic-religious sites; the changing contours of matrilineal practices in a Muslim community; and how Muslim women negotiate personal/Islamic law in a plural judicial landscape. The essays highlight the impossibility of understanding contemporary Islam outside the logic of modern, secular-liberal governance—a standpoint that helps take the secularism debate forward.

This volume will be valuable for students and scholars of sociology, social anthropology and religious studies.

Call for Papers: Workshop 1: AHRC GCRF Minorities on Indian Campuses Research Network

10th December 2020

Short proposals by 5th October 2020

Organisers: Dr Ashok Kumar Mocherla and Dr Alison Halford

This project examines minority students’ lived experiences of discrimination and marginalisation on higher education campuses in India. As a research network, we will run two workshops and a conference to facilitate academic discussions around religion or belief in the HE sector in India. For further details – https://www.coventry.ac.uk/research/research-directories/current-projects/2020/minorities-on-campus/

For this first project workshop we seek to explore the intellectual paradigms that shape how minority-ness if intellectualised in the Indian HE sector. We welcome your proposals (details of the CFP and key dates to bear in mind are appended below).

Please send us your short proposals by 5th October 2020. Due to the current pandemic we plan to organise this first event virtually, however future network events will be undertaken in person (pandemic permitting!) Future events will examine lived experiences of equality and diversity, as well as possibilities for inclusivity within HE. We will update you about these future event in due course. We will also gradually be building a virtual network of academics and practitioners in this field, so please also get in touch if you would like to be part of this network.

AASR September Newsletter

The Call for Paper for the 45th Annual Conference of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion (AASR) is now open. Submission for abstracts is open till 31 October 2020. Please check out our website for more information. We look forward to seeing you there.

Call for Papers:

Conferences
36th ISSR/SISR ‘Religion in Global/Local Perspectives: Diffusion, Migration, Transformation’ Conference, 12-15 July 2021, Taipei, Taiwan. Call for sessions: 15 July to 15 September 2020. Call for papers: 1 October to 15 November 2020. More info

A Continuing Legacy of Persian Poetry and Music, Australian National University, 27 November 2020. Submission deadline 20 September 2020. More info

3rd ANU Religion Conference – Religion and Migration: Culture and Policy. Canberra, 8-10 December 2021 (new date). Proposal deadline 21 May 2021. More info 

Publications
Call for Chapters: Exploring multilingualism, religion and spirituality in Australian life. Deadline 15 September 2020. 

Call for paper: Religions‘ special issue: “Pandemic, Religion and Non-religion”Deadline 31 August 2020. 

Call for papers on Religions’ special issue: ‘Religion, Law and Politics‘. Deadline 18 December 2020. 

Call for papers: Special Issue on “Historizing Islamophobia”. Deadline February 2021. 
Virtual Events
Please note some activities from IAHR that may be of interest:
1. Virtual Book Fair 

2. The IAHR webinar: “Reflections on the Study of Religion in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Past, Present, and Prospect”Roundtable participants, in order of speaking: Profs. Paul Morris, Will Sweetman, John Shaver, and Ben Schonthal. Chair: Prof. Ann Taves (IAHR Vice-President)
Time: Sep 16, Wed, 8:00PM-9:30PM GMT  (=Sep 17, 08:00AM in Auckland, New Zealand)
https://otago.zoom.us/j/99875715215?pwd=eVltVHJZT1UwN0NVNWxkNGVIc0dUZz09
Meeting ID: 998 7571 5215, Passcode: 882084

3. The IAHR-WSN webinar: “Announcing a New IAHR Women Scholars Network Webinar Series”Presenters: Profs. Rosalind Hackett, Morny Joy (founders), Jenny Berglund, Jay Johnston (outgoing coordinators), Milda Ališauskienė, Amy Allocco, (incoming coordinators)Program:Introducing the IAHR-WSNPresentation of founders and coordinatorsPlanned future activitiesSuggestions from members on future activitiesQuestions & Answers
Time: Sep 21, Mon, 2:00 PM-3:00PM GMT
https://zoom.us/j/94932973049?pwd=Rm5iYk10SDdLaTk2dTdrS0lqZU1QZz09
Meeting ID: 949 3297 3049, Passcode: 465973
Grant/PhD/Job Opportunities:
Research Fellow in Ecotheology / Philosophy of Religion, University of Oslo Faculty of Theology

PhD Position in Framing of Apocrypha in Coptic Manuscripts, University of Oslo The Faculty of Theology
Latest Publications:
Cusack, Carole M. (2020), ‘Anne Hamilton-Byrne and the Family: Charisma, Criminality, and Media in the Construction of an Australian ‘Cult’ Leader‘, Nova Religio: The Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions 24(1): 31-54. 

Cusack, Carole M. (2020), ‘The Enneagram: G. I. Gurdjieff’s Esoteric Symbol‘, Aries: Journal for the Study of Western Esotericism 20(1): 31-54. 
 
Cusack, Carole M. (2020), ‘Leaving New Religious Movements’, in Daniel Enstedt, Göran Larsson, and Teemu T. Mantsinen (eds), Handbook of Leaving Religion, Leiden and Boston: Brill, 231-241. 

Cusack, Carole M. (2020), ‘Esoteric Tourism in Scotland: Rosslyn Chapel, The Da Vinci Code, and the Appeal of the ‘New Age’’, in Jonathan M. Wooding and Lorna Barrow (eds), Prophecy, Memory and Fate in the Early and Medieval Celtic World, Sydney Series in Celtic Studies, Sydney University Press, 247-270. 

Cusack, Carole M. (2020), ‘Fiction and the Memory of ‘Cultic Violence’: Charisma, Power and Gender in Peoples Temple and the Manson Family’, New Literary Observer, No. 163 (Russian). 

Kim, David W. (ed)(2020) New Religious Movements in Modern Asian History: Sociocultural Alternatives. Rowman & Littlefield. 

Rane, Halim et al (2020), ‘Islam in Australia: A National Survey of Muslim Australian Citizens and Permanent Residents’Religions, 11, 419.
 
Milani, Milad (2020), ‘The “Sufism” of Monsieur Ibrahim’, Cultural Fusion of Sufi Islam: Alternative Paths to Mystical Faith, Routledge 9781138615038.

Milani, Milad (2020), ‘Shariati, Ali’, The SAGE Encyclopedia of the Sociology of Religion, Sage Publications 9781473942202.

Milani, Milad (2020), ‘Neo-Sufism’, The SAGE Encyclopedia of the Sociology of Religion, Sage Publications 9781473942202.

Milani, Milad (2020), ‘Sufism’, The SAGE Encyclopedia of the Sociology of Religion, Sage Publications 9781473942202.

Trompf, G. and Milani, Milad (2019), ‘From “Zurvanism” to Mazdak’, The Gnostic World, Routledge 9781138673939.

Milani, Milad (2019), ‘Classic Sufism and Gnosis’, The Gnostic World, Routledge 9781138673939.

Catolicismo y globalización: Nuevas perspectivas de las Misiones Jesuitas

Formulario de inscripción a la conferencia a cargo de José Casanova.

Si ud ya se inscribió a esta conferencia en el formulario correspondiente a todo el ciclo de conferencias, no es necesario volver a hacerlo.

La conferencia se realizará el jueves 24 de setiembre a las 17 hs (Uruguay)

Por favor asegúrese de escribir bien su correo electrónico, ya que se le enviará por esa vía el link a la reunión de Zoom.

Por consultas, escribir a: isor@ucu.edu.uy

Call for Papers: "Digitalization of society and the future of Christianity”

Dear colleagues!

We invite you to participate in the VII International Conference of the Faculty of Social Sciences of the Orthodox St. Tikhon’s University for the Humanities “Digitalization of society and the future of Christianity. On the issue of transformation of the value-normative system of the society”.

During the conference, it is proposed to address the following issues:

  1. problems of digitalization in the light of the Christian future world;
  2. philosophical and anthropological understanding of the place of Christianity in the digital future of society;
  3. value-normative system and technological development (technology);
  4. Christian culture in the era of digitalization;
  5. virtual worlds and the spiritual world of Christianity: the conflict of meanings;
  6. Christianity and the transformation of the value bases of power in a digital society;
  7. digital religions in the light of the Christian tradition;
  8. regional features of the Christian world in the digital age.

Articles of all speakers of the conference will be published in its final collection.

Applications for participation and abstracts (approximately 80 words) are accepted until November 1, 2020 at digitalization.pstgu2021@gmail.com

It is possible face-to-face or remote speech at the conference. The form of the speech should be written in the application.

Conference working languages: Russian and English.

Time and place of the conference:
On February 18-19, 2021, 10.00-17.00.
6 Likhov pereulok, Moscow

Call for Papers: British Muslims and Covid-19: Impacts, Experiences and Responses

8th December 2020     

A free MBRN online symposium

Last date for submission of abstracts: 30th October 2020

http://www.mbrn.org.uk/call-for-papers-british-muslims-and-covid-19-impacts-experiences-and-responses/

Research on Covid-19 has highlighted its disproportionate impact on Black and Asian Minority Ethnic groups (BAME) communities (Public Health England, 2020). However, these studies only offer a limited understanding of the particularity of experiences within the umbrella category BAME. For instance, there is only limited discussion around faith in relation to Covid-19, its impacts and the socio-economic fall-outs of lockdown. This MBRN symposium will redress this gap by taking an intersectional perspective in mapping and analysing the impact of Covid-19 on British Muslim communities. By bringing together practitioners and academics, we will examine how diverse British Muslim communities have experienced the pandemic, how their lives have been impacted during and after lockdown and how they responded.

During the lockdown, we have witnessed unprecedented impacts on British Muslims including the closing of mosques and madrassas, cancellation of Friday congregational prayers, Ramadan in lock-down and a significantly limited Hajj. Muslim faith and community leader have played important roles in translating theological rulings into practical guidance, which have largely been adhered to within Muslim communities. Similarly, children and young Muslims, like all young people have experienced the impact of Covid-19 in relation to their education (Children’s Commissioner, 2020). High levels of socio-economic disadvantage amongst British Muslim households mean that we can expect a disproportionate effect of lockdown and Covid-19 on British Muslims. Home learning during school closure, for instance, brought to the surface as well as enhanced the disparities in access to education for disadvantaged pupils, especially those who are known to be at risk of falling behind such as British Muslim pupils.

By focusing on the experiences of British Muslims, this online symposium will enable us to examine the interplay of ethnicity, religion and deprivation, in negotiating the particular challenges of living through Covid-19. It will explore the diversity of ways in which British Muslims have experienced and responded to Covid-19, and seek to understand its ongoing impacts. Our aim is to suggest answers for the question, “How are diverse British Muslims living through, and responding to the challenges of, Covid-19?”.

We invite proposals for papers that explore any dimension of Muslim identity / lived experiences in relation to the pandemic, lockdown and subsequent socio-economic implications of Covid-19 in Britain. We hope that the symposium will attract academics and practitioners from a range of epistemological positions and disciplinary standpoints. Possible themes and topics include (but not limited to):

  • · the intersections of religion, ethnicity and gender in experiences of and responses to Covid-19
  • · inclusion and critical engagement of religion as part of the national response to Covid-19
  • · disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on British Muslim communities
  • · racism and prejudice (including Islamophobia) linked to Covid-19
  • · responses of British Muslim charitable and volunteering organisations
  • · responses of British Muslim faith leaders and scholars
  • · support for bereaved families
  • · Islamic theological perspectives on quarantine
  • · impact on lived experiences British Muslim families (home-schooling, multi-generational families)
  • · media representations of Muslims in relation to Covid-19
  • · counter-terrorism and surveillance during a pandemic
  • · the negotiation of cultural, religious and moral values while socially-distancing
  • · the role of young people in shaping the British Muslim responses to Covid-19
  • · methodological reflections on working with Muslims during the pandemic

To submit a proposal:

  • · Please submit a title and abstract of no more than 300 words together with names and short biographies (150 words) of the presenter/s, institutional affiliation/s (if relevant), and contact details.
  • · We also welcome proposals from postgraduate researchers, independent scholars and practitioners.
  • · Proposals should be sent to MuslimsinBritainRN@gmail.com
  • · Academic enquiries should be sent to Dr. Khadijah Elshayyal, khadijah@iga-cis.org
  • · Deadline: 5pm on Friday 30th October 2020
  • · Successful presenters will be notified by Friday 6th November 2020

Registration

· This is a free event, further details about the registration process will be circulated and posted on the MBRN website soon

Conference Organisers

Dr Sariya Cheruvallil-Contractor (Chair), Dr Khadijah Elshayyal (General Secretary), Dr Sufyan Dogra, Sadiya Ahmed, Dr Jawiria Naseem and Dr Asma Khan (Committee Members)

MBRN Executive Committee

https://www.mbrn.org.uk/committee/ Twitter: @MuslimsInBritRN; www.facebook.com/muslimsinbritainresearchnetwork/

Funding Opportunity: Research on Muslim Women’s Experiences of Maternity Care

About MWNUK

Muslim Women’s Network UK (MWNUK) is a small charity (no.1155092) that works to improve social justice and equality for Muslim women and girls. We find out about their experiences through research and helpline enquiries. We identify policy and practice gaps and use this information to influence political decision makers and inform our community campaigns. We also develop resources and train women, so they are better aware of their rights. 

About the Research

MWNUK has secured funding from the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation to undertake research into Muslim women’s experiences of maternity care in England.

Research Aim

The aim of this research is to develop an in-depth understanding of the experiences of Muslim women who have accessed maternity care in the last five years in England. The main objective when analysing their experiences is to find out whether the women felt they were subjected to discriminatory attitudes and behaviours, what this looked like to them and how they felt it impacted on their health care (e.g. whether it could be contributing to increased maternal mortality and morbidity) so that lessons can be learned to mitigate existing inequalities.  

Background to the Research

The deep inequalities in maternity care and outcomes in England are well documented. Black women are 4-5 times more likely to die during pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period than White women, while for Asian women it is 2-3 times more likely to be the case. A number of factors may contribute to poorer care and outcomes for certain groups of women. These include biological factors (e.g. individual physiologies or specific underlying health conditions among women from racialised minorities); structural inequalities impacting on socio-economic status, levels of education and thus capacity to communicate effectively; poor maternity practices and discriminatory attitudes among health professionals; insecure migration status leading to delays in seeking help. All of these can increase the risk of complications and limit access to ante-natal care and information. However, all women regardless of their social background or location should receive equally high standards of care. 

In this research, we focus on women’s experiences of discrimination and bias because it is essential that service providers understand what this looks like so that bespoke training can be developed to challenge / change attitudes as opposed to generic equality, diversity and inclusion training.

Research Questions

When gathering in depth information from Muslim women, questions will be designed to elicit the following information:

  • If and how experiences vary according to differing ethnicities (with a focus on Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Indian and Black African and African-Caribbean backgrounds), educational levels, ages, language needs and migration status;
  • If and how experiences vary according to types of maternity care e.g. antenatal advice / care; care during birth; and post-natal advice / care;
  • Perceptions of how they are dealt with by and attitudes of different healthcare practitioners
  • The standard of care received;
  • Mental health impact of experiences i.e. how it made the women feel, including whether their experiences affected their further engagement with health service professionals;
  • Perceptions of physical health impacts including: complications, traumatic births; impact on mother and baby’s health

Research Time-Table

We estimate that this research will take approximately 6 months:

  • October 2020 – desk research on BAME women’s maternal health and analysis of the results of the online survey to be conducted by MWN among Muslim women who have accessed maternity care in England over the last 5 years
  • November 2020 – interview women
  • December 2020 /January 2021 – interview women
  • January / February 2021 – analysis of interview data
  • February / March 2021– first draft of report
  • April / May 2021 – final report

Research Location

Although MWNUK is based in Birmingham, the researcher will be expected to work from home and will conduct telephone or video interviews with women across England.

Applicant Profile

We invite suitably qualified individuals to apply such as those with research experience, preferably to PhD standard and who have experience of interviewing women from Black Asian Minority Ethnic backgrounds. The ability to speak a South Asian language (preferably Urdu or Punjabi) is desirable. The post is open to women only, as it is an occupational requirement that the post be held by a woman (Schedule 9, Part 1, Paragraph 1, Equality Act 2010).

Application Time-Table

  • Deadlines for Applications: 12 noon Monday 28th September 2020
  • Interviews: Week beginning 5th October 2020

Remuneration and Scope of Work to be Covered

The researcher will be self-employed and will be paid £12,600 for the research and report which will include:

  • Analysing an online survey on Muslim women’s maternity experiences
  • Contacting women and arranging about 35 interviews
  • Analysing the interviews
  • Writing a draft followed by a final report

Note:  Although MWN will identify the women to be interviewed, the researcher may be required to provide some support to identify women for the research.

How to Apply

Please submit a cover letter explaining why you are interested in carrying out this research, strengths you can bring to this piece of work and experience you have of working with and conducting research about women from racialised minorities. Cover letters should be a maximum of 3 sides of A4. Please send these to contact@mwnuk.co.uk.  By 12 noon  Monday 28th September 2020.

ASA Job Bank: Research Associate and Visiting Faculty

The following new job listing has been posted in the ASA Job Bank and may be of interest to section members:

Job ID: 16471
Institution: Harvard Divinity School
Department: Women’s Studies in Religion Program
Title: Research Associate and Visiting Faculty
Position/Rank: Academic Positions: Assistant/Associate Professor, Academic Positions: Full Professor, Academic Positions: Lecturer
Areas/Special Programs: Sex and Gender , Religion

For additional information on this position (including how to apply), visit the ASA Job Bank at http://jobbank.asanet.org.