ASA RELIGION SECTION PARTNERS TO CREATE A NEW GRADUATE STUDENT MENTORING COMMUNITY

The ASA Religion Section is teaming up with The Aggie Research Program (ARP) at Texas A&M University to create a research mentoring community. Through a series of three online workshops hosted by the ARP, participants will:

  • form a research-intensive community of their peers,
  • facilitate the creation of team-based research projects using their own research agenda,
  • recruit 3-5 undergraduate researchers,
  • learn mentoring and leadership strategies to help guide students engaging in authentic research experiences, and
  • collaborate with each other to overcome challenges and develop best practices for research mentoring.

These interactive workshops will guide participants through the process of creating, managing, and developing a research team while simultaneously fostering the development of the research-intensive community.

Any graduate student, any methodology, and any stage of research will benefit from the skills and community developed in this pilot program.

Please join us for Workshop #1—Building a Research-Intensive Community on Friday, December 11 @ 3-4:30pm CST.

To register, please RSVP using this link: https://tamu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0IEjHcPzg1FdNnn

Upon submission, you will receive an email with the Zoom link for the workshop. If you do not receive a Zoom link, please contact Andrew McNeely (amcneely@tamu.edu).

The New Worldview Paradigm in RE: Implications for the Nonreligious?

Panel discussion with Professor Trevor Cooling (Canterbury Christ Church University and Religious Education Council of England and Wales), Dr Ruth Wareham (Humanists UK) and Dr Lois Lee (University of Kent); chaired by Dr Chris Deacy (University of Kent)

1pm Wednesday 2 December 2020 (Zoom joining information below)

Across the United Kingdom, Religious Education is subject to its most thorough-going review in a generation, with proposed reforms described as a paradigm change for the sector (Cooling et al 2020). Amongst other issues, proposals offered by the Commission on Religious Education in England and Wales and by the Welsh Government respond explicitly to the growing number of people who identify as nonreligious: What could this new approach to Religious Education mean for them? Their recommendations take better account of nonreligious perspectives than ever before. But is it right to assume that these proposed changes to RE are a straightforward “victory” for those that have called for better representation of nonreligion in the RE classroom? Does implementation of these proposals – already underway in some schools – mean that religious and nonreligious worldviews exist on a level playing field?

Join us for a panel discussion focusing attention on what a worldview approach to RE means in relation to the nonreligious.

Full details and the link to register can be found at: https://www.kent.ac.uk/events/event/46876/the-new-worldview-paradigm-in-re-implications-for-the-nonreligious

African Religions unit in the American Academy of Religion.

Dear Colleagues:

We are writing you from the African Religions unit in the American Academy of Religion.

As you will know, the AAR annual meeting was supposed to take place in Boston this weekend, but because of COVID-19 will now take place virtually from November 29 to December 10. For practical details about registration and the conference program, please see here: https://www.aarweb.org/AARAnnualMeeting2020/AARAnnualMeeting2020/Home.aspx

For your convenience, we put together an overview of the sessions hosted by our unit, and by our sister unit, African Diaspora Religions. Please share this widely in your networks: https://africanreligionsgroup.wordpress.com/2020/10/19/african-religions-sessions-at-aar-2020/ We look forward to welcoming you at our sessions.

In particular, we invite you to our Business meeting (Tuesday, December 8, 5:30 PM-6:00 PM, EST UTC-5), where we will discuss the future planning for our unit. In preparation for the business meeting, we also welcome your nominations for a vacancy in our Steering Committee, as Devaka Premawardhana’s term is coming to an end this year. Steering committee members are required to be members of AAR, and expected to attend annual meetings and participate in the unit. The steering committee plays a vital role in the running of our unit, especially in the process of discussing the annual call for papers and reviewing paper proposals. If we receive more than one nomination, we will call for a poll among members of the unit.

Please submit your nomination (name, email address, affiliation, and a short motivation) by November 30 to the undersigned.

The current committee membership is:

  • Sara Fretheim, University of Munster
  • Georgette Ledgister, Harvard Divinity School
  • Mary Nyangweso, University of East Carolina
  • Devaka Premawardhana, Emory University
  • Tyrone Cass Ross, Temple University
  • Funlayo Wood, University of California, Santa Barbara Warm wishes,

David Amponsah and Adriaan van Klinken, co-chairs amda@sas.upenn.edu  / a.vanklinken@leeds.ac.uk

Adriaan van Klinken
Professor of Religion and African Studies
School of Philosophy, Religion and the History of Science / Leeds University Centre for African Studies
University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT United Kingdom

“Les changements constitutionnels de la Loi sur la laïcité du Québec”

Le Centre de recherche Société, Droit et Religions de l’Université de Sherbrooke (SoDRUS) vous invite à une conférence publique qui aura lieu le mercredi 2 décembre 2020. 

Les changements constitutionnels de la Loi sur la laïcité du Québec

Date : 2 décembre 2020

Heure : 11h55

Lieu : Événement tenu en ligne, sur TEAMS.

Inscription obligatoire à l’adresse suivante : sodrus@usherbrooke.ca

Cette conférence sera donnée par Bertrand Lavoie, chercheur partenaire au SoDRUS.

Merci de diffuser l’information dans vos réseaux.

Au plaisir de vous accueillir,

Raphaël Mathieu Legault-Laberge, Ph.D.

Coordonnateur et chercheur partenaire au SoDRUS

Prize: Best Doctoral Thesis or First Monograph in the Study of Islam and the Muslim World

The Sixth Round of the BRAIS-De Gruyter Prize in the Study of Islam and the Muslim World is now open for submissions.

The British Association for Islamic Studies (BRAIS) and De Gruyter are delighted to announce the sixth round of the BRAIS-De Gruyter Prize in the Study of Islam and the Muslim World. This international prize will be awarded annually to the best doctoral thesis or unpublished first monograph based on a doctoral thesis. English-language submissions on any aspect of the academic study of Islam and the Muslim world, past and present, including Muslim-minority societies are accepted. Applicants can be based in any country, and manuscripts will be assessed on the basis of scholarly quality and originality.

The award includes publication of the winning manuscript and a prize of £1,000, and it will be officially presented at the Annual Conference of BRAIS. The selection process will be undertaken by a seven-member prize committee comprising established academics from across the field.

Deadline: 5.00 pm GMT, 31 December 2020

For more details, including rules and regulations, contact, the past Prize winners, and the Prize committee members, please visit: http://www.brais.ac.uk/prize/2021

International Journal of Sociology and Anthropology – October 2020 Table of Content

The latest issue of International Journal of Sociology and Anthropology  (IJSA) is available online. See table of content below.

International Journal of Sociology and Anthropology welcomes the submission of manuscripts via its online  Manuscript Management System 
Read some of IJSA latest articles
What Transformative Leaders do: Emerging Perspectives in the 21st Century

This paper examines the call for transformative leadership in the 21st century. It explores recent published articles on the subject matter in order to establish the expectations of a transformative leader. The turn of the century heralded a call for the adoption of a transformative agenda on the African continent. Nonetheless, the turbulent political, dynamic economic shifts and disruptive global events, such as posed…

Author(s): Allan D. M. Bukusi  

https://doi.org/10.5897/IJSA2020.0871
 
Article Number: D8BFAA764995

Abstract

Jungle justice in Lagos metropolis, Nigeria

Jungle justice has added another dimension to the neigbourhood insecurity challenge in Lagos metropolis. The reoccurring lynching of suspect(s) in a crime scene, in Lagos metropolis and Nigeria, as well as, the dearth of empirical studies on this heinous crime in Nigeria motivated this study. Thus, this study anchored on Social Disorganisation Theory (SDT) of the Chicago School of Criminology, which identified…

Author(s): Ayomide Ilori  

https://doi.org/10.5897/IJSA2020.0845
 
Article Number: 217039964279

Abstract

‘They deceived us’: Narratives of Addis Ababa development-induced displaced peasants

This paper explores the impacts of the fast spatial expansion of Addis Ababa, the capital city of Ethiopia, on the suburb small-scale farming community. Recently, combined with rapid population growth and booming economy, the city experienced a rapid physical expansion without proper urban planning. The sprawl of the city has dislocated small-scale farming communities in the suburbs and led to one of the major deadly…

Author(s): Bula S. Wayessa
 
https://doi.org/10.5897/IJSA2020.0862
 
Article Number: 44B3AF864483

Abstract

Queer spirituality of black lesbians in Bloemfontein, South Africa

Research on lesbian women and their sexuality has increased since the adoption of a democratic constitution in South Africa. Yet a large part of the research has focused more on the prevalence of rape on Black lesbians in South African townships, while a substantial amount focused more on the lived experiences of Christian gays. The available body of work above has been taken into consideration and, therefore, this…

Author(s): Ntombana Luvuyo, Nombulelo Towa and Nobubele Phuza

https://doi.org/10.5897/IJSA2020.0865
 
Article Number: D90225564489

Abstract

Moral panic and social order: Analysis of Akwa Ibom street children
 
The incidence of street children around the world had raised concern about social order. Scholars have paid attention to socioeconomic and psychological implications ignoring the cultural dynamics that contribute to this development. This paper focuses on a category of street children in Akwa-Ibom state of Nigeria. They are the child-witches, thrown to the street due to witchcraft label masterminded by parents and…

Author(s): Lydia Isioma Chineyemba

https://doi.org/10.5897/IJSA2019.0829
 
Article Number: F4FD98063378

Abstract

Knowledge and perceptions of female genital mutilation among African immigrant women in Windsor, Canada
 
The objective of this is to investigate African immigrant women’s perceptions of female genital mutilation (FGM) within the Canadian Criminal Code. Ten African immigrant women resident in Windsor, Canada were selected using snowball sampling for interviews. These women were of four African nationalities, namely Nigeria, Ghana, Somalia and Sudan. Semi-structured interview protocol with open answer possibilities…

Author(s): Francisca Isi Omorodion

https://doi.org/10.5897/IJSA2019.0839
 
Article Number: B83F93C63627

Abstract

Challenges faced by the Bhotias for their livelihood and preservation of culture
 
We frequently hear about the significance of cultural heritage. And while discussing humanitarian efforts, we might hear the phrase “cultural preservation.” The term encompasses several activities surrounding maintaining ancient cultures from large nations all the way down to small indigenous tribes. However, the meaning of cultural heritage and its preservation needs to be ascertained. Heritage is an asset,…

Author(s): Nirmesh Sharma  

https://doi.org/10.5897/IJSA2020.0841
 
Article Number: 13DD4B963943

Abstract

Possible selves of a hashtag: Moving from the theory of speech acts to cultural objects to interpret hashtags
 
In recent years hashtag studies have increased their numbers. The role of hashtags becomes increasingly predominant in social media studies. Many researchers wonder how to study them, ending up treating them in an aggregate way and turning to big data and static-mathematical modeling. This type of studies seem to consider hashtags as tools, favoring a single analysis perspective. In fact, The studies and the research…

Author(s): Gevisa La Rocca

https://doi.org/10.5897/IJSA2019.0833
 
Article Number: 31E6E0B63132

Abstract
 
Home truths behind closed doors: Reciting the lived experiences of child domestic workers in selected towns of Gedeo Zone, Southern Ethiopia
 
This qualitative study was aimed at looking into the lived experiences of child domestic workers in the selected towns of Gedeo Zone. A triangulation of key informant interviews, in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, informal conversations, non-participant observations, and life histories were employed to collect the required data from child domestic workers, brokers, urban residents, police officers, and…

Author(s): Alemayehu Anja Aboye and Fekadu Israel Alambo

https://doi.org/10.5897/IJSA2019.821
 
Article Number: C23EF1862536

Abstract
 
Anthropometric measurements for young males in Saudi Arabia
 
The purpose of this study was to fill the gap of not having enough anthropometric data for young males in Saudi Arabia. Developing an anthropometric database on Saudi adults will help the local designers, manufactures and producers to create more efficient industrial applications, and products for Saudi population. The study was performed in the Riyadh city, the capital and the largest city in Saudi Arabia, among a…

Author(s): Waleed Basuliman

https://doi.org/10.5897/IJSA2016.0693
 
Article Number: F3A257957952

Abstract

Read full text of all IJSA Articles

AASR November Newsletter

Call for Papers:

Conferences
36th ISSR/SISR ‘Religion in Global/Local Perspectives: Diffusion, Migration, Transformation’ Conference, 12-15 July 2021 (digital only), Taipei, Taiwan. Call for sessions extended till 14 December 2020. Call for papers revised: 8 January to 28 February 2021. More info
Center for Critical Research on Religion and Queens University Belfast, conference on “Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion”, 11-14 June 2021. Proposal deadline 15 January 2021. More info.
3rd ANU Religion Conference – Religion and Migration: Culture and Policy. Canberra, 8-10 December 2021. Proposal deadline 21 May 2021. More info 

Publications
Call for Book Proposals in Modern East Asian Religion and Culture
Call for papers for the International Journal for the Study of New Religions
Call for papers on Religions’ special issue: ‘Religion, Law and Politics‘. Deadline 18 December 2020. 
Call for paper for a thematic issue of Religion: Emic Categories and New Paths / Case Studies in the Scholarly Use of Indigenous Concepts (working title). Deadline Feb 2021. 
Call for papers: Special Issue on “Historizing Islamophobia”. Deadline February 2021. 

Teaching Resources
Adeana McNicholl and Ann Gleig are looking for material to include in their co-directed project “Teaching Resources for Buddhism, race and racism,” which is being hosted at teachingbuddhism.net and funded by The Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation at the University of Toronto.  Our aim is to compile and provide a comprehensive list of primary and secondary material as well as teaching resources, including syllabi, lesson plans, and strategies, when teaching issues of race and racism in Buddhist Studies courses. Topics can include Orientalism, decolonization, race, and ethnicity anywhere in the Buddhist world. 

Please send any relevant material to Adeana McNicholl at adeana.mcnicholl@vanderbilt.edu and Ann Gleig at ann.gleig@ucf.edu
 
Event:
Dr Anna Halafoff will be speaking at an international workshop Religion and Science in Covid Times: Research Perspectives, organised by UAB Barcelona and the International Organization of Scientific Research: November 19th & 20th, 2020 | Central European Time (UTC +1)The Australian Sociology Association (TASA) has a series of presentations on Religion. Registration and details.‘Religion and Public Life in Australia’ on 24 Nov 2020, 1-2.30pm.’Grants Capture in the Australian Research Council’s “Religion and Religious Studies” Field Code’ on 24 November 2020, 3.30-5pmBook Launch – The Sage Encyclopedia of the Sociology of Religion, 25 Nov 2020, 2-2.30pm
Latest Publications:
Sarah K. Balstrup (2020), Spiritual Sensations: Cinematic Religious Experience and Evolving Conceptions of the Sacred. Bloomsbury Academic. 
Kim, David W. (2020), Daesoon Jinrihoe in Modern Korea: The Emergence, Transformation and Transmission of a New Religion. Newcastle, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 

2021 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting – In-Person Cancelled, Virtual Being Planned

Due to COVID-19, the 2021 ASA Annual Meeting in Chicago has been cancelled. ASA leadership believes it is now clear that the global health crisis will not be resolved by August, and a large gathering of people from around the world presents an untenable health risk. ASA will offer a virtual 2021 ASA Annual Meeting instead of the in-person event. Further information about the virtual meeting will be provided in the coming months.

The ASA online portal is currently open for submissions for the 2021 Annual Meeting. ASA will continue with the submission process uninterrupted. The deadline is February 3. Our Religion Section Program Committee also will continue to plan for our sessions, and we strongly encourage you, your colleagues, and your students to submit in anticipation of a virtual meeting.

Online Symposium: British Muslims and COVID-19: Impacts, Experiences and Responses

Tuesday 8th December 2020, 1pm to 5pm

An MBRN online symposium via Zoom

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/british-muslims-and-covid-19-impacts-experiences-and-responses-tickets-129223730657

Full Programme available at: http://www.mbrn.org.uk/registration-open-british-muslims-and-covid-19/

Research on Covid-19 has highlighted its disproportionate impact on Black and Asian Minority Ethnic groups (BAME) communities (Public Health England, 2020). However, these studies only offer a limited understanding of the particularity of experiences within the umbrella category BAME. For instance, there is only limited discussion around faith in relation to Covid-19, its impacts and the socio-economic fall-outs of lockdown. This MBRN symposium will redress this gap by taking an intersectional perspective in mapping and analysing the impact of Covid-19 on British Muslim communities. By bringing together practitioners and academics, we will examine how diverse British Muslim communities have experienced the pandemic, how their lives have been impacted during and after lockdown and how they responded.
By focusing on the experiences of British Muslims, this online symposium will enable us to examine the interplay of ethnicity, religion and deprivation, in negotiating the particular challenges of living through Covid-19. It will explore the diversity of ways in which British Muslims have experienced and responded to Covid-19, and seek to understand its ongoing impacts. Our aim is to suggest answers for the question, “How are diverse British Muslims living through, and responding to the challenges of, Covid-19?”.
The symposium includes presentations from academics and practitioners from a range of epistemological positions and disciplinary standpoints to explore dimensions of Muslim identity / lived experiences in relation to the pandemic, lockdown and subsequent socio-economic implications of Covid-19 in Britain.
Eventbrite registration essential, please select your preference for the parallel session during registration so you can be pre-assigned to a breakout room.

SISR/ISSR Conference News: July 12-15 2021 will be online

Dear all,

We hope you are doing well in these dramatic times of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This email contains important information to all members about the upcoming 36th biannual SISR/ISSR conference in 2021.

As you know, the next ISSR conference was to be held in Taipei in 2021. For a long time, we hoped to stick to our plan. However, the latest developments of the COVID-19 pandemic shows a rise in infections in many countries, stricter travel restrictions and uncertainties about the time of the end of this global pandemic. In collaboration with the chair of the local committee in Taipei Associate Research Fellow/Professor Wei-hsian Chi, the Executive Committee has decided to postpone the conference in Taiwan until 2023. Instead, the ISSR conference July 12-15 2021 will be a fully digital conference.

In our meeting with Wei-Hsian Chi, we discussed the possibility for a hybrid conference in Taiwan. However, this solution posed a number of problematic issues:

  • • A hybrid conference implies that the physical conference must be covered financially, in addition to a digital solution with more extensive IT support. This solution became relatively costly.
  • • In the current situation, it is difficult to estimate the number of members who would actually be able to go to Taiwan. Even if many of desire to do so, hardly anyone are able to make travel plans today. The risk of many “no shows” is therefore high.
  • • The different time zones would make an international hybrid conference difficult to organize.

We are obviously disappointed to postpone the conference in Taiwan. Our priority is to ensure that a meeting in Taiwan is successful as a meeting place for many of us, even at a later date. Besides, having an online conference this summer will allow the majority of ISSR members to meet, share their research and discuss, regardless of the trajectory of the pandemic.

We are currently working on the organizational and technical details of the 2021 digital conference (any suggestion is most welcome, if you have participated in online conferences over the past few months!).

To enable as many of you as possible to participate, we now reopen the Call for Session until December 14th. This gives you the opportunity to:

The call for papers will be opened from January 8th to February 28th 2021.

These are the new deadlines:

  • Opening of new session proposals: November 10th 2020
  • Closing of session proposals:  December 14th 2020
  • Opening of paper submission: January 8th 2021
  • Closing of session proposals: February 28th 2021

In order to participate in the digital conference, you must be a member of the ISSR. There will be a conference fee, which will only cover the costs of the organization of the digital conference. Indeed, digital conferences require increased IT support to plan and arrange the conference, expenses for the use of conference platforms, translation of keynotes, and other technical and organizational expenses. However, we expect the conference fee to be substantially lower than usual.  The treasurer has to develop a new budget to determine the exact fee so please bear with us until we can provide you with an exact amount.

I hope this information will give more clarity for those of you who were concerned about the 2021 SISR/ISSR conference. The Executive Committee will continue to plan the conference in cooperation with the Council, and we will send out information about the conference as soon as possible.

I hope to see all of you at the digital conference in July 2021!

Best wishes,

Inger Furseth
President SISR/ISSR
Professor, University of Oslo
Email: inger.furseth@sosgeo.uio.no