SOCREL Digest – 22 Jan 2019 to 24 Jan 2019

Call for papers: https://blog.bham.ac.uk/festivalcultures/<https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fblog.bham.ac.uk%2Ffestivalcultures%2F&data=01%7C01%7Cmunnikm%40cardiff.ac.uk%7C0c18bf09084943d2579408d681fa065f%7Cbdb74b3095684856bdbf06759778fcbc%7C1&sdata=OlDdQ20erZx92orwl3Z5xLFe6fWg4w8NSsOuxhdGAF8%3D&reserved=0>https://blog.bham.ac.uk/festivalcultures/<https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fblog.bham.ac.uk%2Ffestivalcultures%2F&data=01%7C01%7Cmunnikm%40cardiff.ac.uk%7C0c18bf09084943d2579408d681fa065f%7Cbdb74b3095684856bdbf06759778fcbc%7C1&sdata=OlDdQ20erZx92orwl3Z5xLFe6fWg4w8NSsOuxhdGAF8%3D&reserved=0>

Inside Festival Cultures: Fields, Bodies, Ecologies

A Conference organised by the University of Birmingham, 16th and 17th May 2019

Preliminary online workshop scheduled for the 18th of February 2019 (4.00 pm to 6.00 pm), which will consider a proposal for an edited collection and contribute towards the design of the conference.

Convened by: Dr Jeremy Kidwell and Dr Maria Nita

Confirmed speakers:

Dr Marion Bowman (The Open University), Prof. François Gauthier (University of Fribourg), Prof Sharif Gemie (The University of Chichester), Prof Graham Harvey (The Open University), Prof Jacqui Mulville (Cardiff University).

The key concern of the proposed conference is to investigate important developments in a growing transatlantic modern festival culture. We will ask how have festivals made use of traditional cultural practices? Are festivals acculturative hubs, thus assisting society to make sense of change? Are festivals laboratories for cultural change and innovation? Might festivals present us with opportunities for ‘an ecological reconciliation’?

The conference will investigate the forces shaping festivals, such as tradition, commemoration, commercialisation, globalisation and innovation. In particular, this event will focus on the role festivals have in processes of cultural transmission in the contemporary world. Modern festivals emerged in the context of significant social and cultural change in the 1960s. Over the past five decades, festival networks have developed a model based on oral traditions, drawn from the memorialisation of the free festivals of the 1960s. Woodstock’s and Glastonbury’s iconic naked festival bodies signalled a profound societal change, whilst displaying a nostalgic re-enactment of and yearning for a simpler past and community. In recent years, trans-national festival networks, like the Burning Man festival, have consciously promoted community-oriented spiritual practices. Our proposed conference wishes to illuminate the facets of these varied dynamics inside festival cultures.

Modern festivals represent a new and exciting area of study reflected by both the rising scholarly interest and the continuous growth of this phenomenon in the West during the past five decades. This era of late modernity or postmodernity was marked by important cultural, social and environmental changes, such as increased globalisation, and the environmental and societal effects of anthropogenic climate change. Modern festivals have to be considered in conjunction with these developments. Hence the Burning Man festival in the Nevada desert is seen by some scholars as an experiment in community resilience in response to climate change, whereby the arid climate of the desert represents a projection of the future of mankind. Perhaps following the earlier transatlantic route of the 1960s, that of Woodstock and Glastonbury, Burning Man is currently extending in Europe.  Such developments should be investigated against the backdrop of other significant global trends, such as the decline of institutionalised religious traditions as well as political, economic and socio-cultural changes. The conference will develop a scholarly conversation around the wider implications of festival culture in Britain and abroad.

More specifically the conference will explore the interplay between two areas of investigation, namely the development and transmission of tradition/s on one hand and, and on the other, the roles festivals have in showcasing innovation and experimentation with cultural change. Many scholars have argued that increased mobility and globalisation in our contemporary world is impacting on the established channels for cultural transmission, thus leading to increased secularisation and a loss in traditional cultural values. Others have shown that festivals can represent important commemorative spaces, and that the transmission of religious and other cultural elements may continue despite decline or disruptions in such institutions as the church, communities of place, the traditional family and so on. At the same time we increasingly live in a world dominated by change, uncertainty and risk, and scholars recognised that the implications of living with unprecedented global risk in a detraditionalised society involve the development of new types of subversive social movements. Festivals appear to have developed in this context and against such global trends, yet during the past five decades they have themselves changed significantly, with some public and academic voices deploring their decline into an increasingly corporate ethos.

We expect the conference will attract broad interdisciplinary participation, which will help us explore broader themes in this field of research and begin a dialogue on the role festivals have in shaping an emerging global culture, as well as their role in mediating change and promoting cultural innovation.

We welcome 20-minute papers that could include but are not limited to the following topics:

(1) ‘Festival fields as sites of commemoration’;

(2) ‘Music, orality and tradition in global encounters’;

(3) ‘Festival bodies: change and cultural transmission’

(4) ‘Greening and consumerism at festivals.’

Proposals of about 200 words together with a short biographical note (50 words) in Word or PDF format should be sent to M.Nita@Bham.ac.uk<mailto:M.Nita@Bham.ac.uk> by February 7th, 2019.

Dr Maria Nita
Associate lecturer in the School of Philosophy, Theology & Religion
College of Arts and Law
The University of Birmingham

Dr. Michael Munnik FHEA
Lecturer, Centre for the Study of Islam in the UK
Cardiff University
School of History, Archaeology and Religion
John Percival Building
Colum Drive
Cardiff
CF10 3EG
Tel: +44 (0)29 2087 5646
Mob : +44 (0)7905 219355
E-mail: munnikm@cardiff.ac.uk
@michaelmunnik<https://twitter.com/michaelmunnik>

Read my latest article:
Reaching out in a Climate of Negativity: Perceptions and Persistence among Muslim Sources Engaging with News Media
(Contemporary Islam – Open Access)

A Field Theory Perspective on Journalist–Source Relations: A Study of ‘New Entrants’ and ‘Authorised Knowers’ among Scottish Muslims<http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0038038517696220>
(Sociology – Open Access)

Dr. Michael Munnik FHEA
Darlithydd, Canolfan ar gyfer Astudio Islam yn y DU
Prifysgol Caerdydd
Ysgol Hanes, Archaeoleg a Chrefydd
Adeilad John Percival
Rhodfa Colum
Caerdydd
CF10 3EG
Ffôn : +44 (0)29 2087 5646
Ffôn symudol: +44 (0)7905 219355
E-bost: munnikm@caerdydd.ac.uk
@michaelmunnik<https://twitter.com/michaelmunnik>

Darllenwch fy erthygl ddiweddaraf:
Reaching out in a Climate of Negativity: Perceptions and Persistence among Muslim Sources Engaging with News Media
(Contemporary Islam – Mynediad Agored)

A Field Theory Perspective on Journalist–Source Relations: A Study of ‘New Entrants’ and ‘Authorised Knowers’ among Scottish Muslims<http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0038038517696220>
(Sociology – Mynediad Agored)

SOCREL Digest – 24 Jan 2019 to 26 Jan 2019

Regulating the financial abuse of religious and spiritual capital.

Research Workshop, School of Law, 14 February 2019.

Religion is powerful, with the power of religion being a type of religious
capital. Such

power can be abused. Religious and spiritual fraud is a significant social
problem,

with one estimate of Christian fraud alone amounting to $34bn per year
globally. It

also raises profound theoretical questions around the appropriate
relationship

between the state, religious and spiritual organizations  and the community;
and in

particular the difficult question of the authority of the religiously
pluralist state to

determine facts in a religious context. The regulation of religious and
spiritual power

that results in financial gain to a religious leader or organization needs
to thread a

difficult course through under-regulation (with the exposure of those whom regulation seeks to protect, and damage to the interests which underpin an
area of

regulation) and over-regulation (with the risk of excessive restriction of
the religious

or spiritual interests of individuals and organizations, and damage to the
interests

which religious rights seek to advance).

The workshop will be chaired by Professor Peter Edge (Professor of Law,
Oxford

Brookes University). Professor Pauline Ridge (Professor of Law, ANU;
Visiting

Fellow, Oxford Brookes University) will focus on the application of general
rules

around undue influence in the particular context of religious and spiritual
financing.

Craig Allen (Research student, Oxford Brookes University) will focus on the

application of general criminal rules, particularly the Fraud Act 2006, in
religious

contexts.

The workshop will take place on the Headington Campus of Oxford Brookes

University between 2 and 4pm on Thursday 14th of February 2019. Attendance
is

free, but places are limited. Please contact Craig Allen (
17020595@brookes.ac.uk)

to reserve a place.

Best wishes,

Craig

Call for Papers: "Religion in Political Contention:

“Religion in Political Contention: Religious Dimensions in Social Movements, Rebellions, and Revolutions”

For a panel proposal to the Association for the Sociology of Religion 81st Annual Meeting, New York, NY, August 11-13, 2019

While religion is often recognized as a social force that maintains, if not legitimates, the socio-political order, religion has also played a role in rebellions, revolts, social movements, and revolutions. Religion, that is, can play a role in contentious politics. Karl Marx famously suggested that religion is the “opium of the people,” a phrase that is frequently taken out of context and misunderstood. In the same passage, he also wrote religion is “an expression of real suffering and a protest against” it, suggesting that religion is also a source and instrument of social change. Indeed, Marx’s collaborator, Friedrich Engels wrote on essay on the German Peasant Wars focusing on the revolutionary movement led by theologian Thomas Münzer, underscoring the latter point on social change dynamics. Similarly, Max Weber showed us how religion is both a source of domination (traditional or bureaucratic) and social transformation (charismatic, which is revolutionary, but also another type of domination). Even Emile Durkheim, who typically is associated with a status quo oriented theory of religion, makes a case for the transcendent power of religious rituals. Today, too many sociologists of religion continue very conventional modes of thinking – religion is either hegemonic or counter-hegemonic — ignoring how religion is both a hegemonic and counter-hegemonic force in past and contemporary political scenarios.

For this panel, we will invite papers that explore the relationship religion – as a shared cultural system, source of solidarity, and ways of thinking, feeling, and acting – has to social movements, rebellions and revolutions. We are interested in understanding how and under what conditions religion functions as a progressive and/or reactionary force that compels people to challenge or protect the order of things. We are particularly interested in prophetic and messianic movements, secular religions (e.g., The Cult of the Supreme Being and Science as Religion), and liberation theologies. While we welcome contemporary explorations (e.g., popular religion and evangelism in Latin America, the Arab Spring, and resistance to globalization), we also welcome the exploration of past events (e.g., the English, French, Iranian, and Nicaraguan revolutions; Taiping and Boxer Rebellions in China; and the German Peasant Wars of the 16th century). Special consideration will be given to theoretical treatments on the relationship religion has to progressive and/or reactionary politics. Papers that focus on contemporary and historical case studies in the U.S. are welcome. Priority will be given to papers that aim to make sense of the institutional, organizational, ritualistic, discursive (e.g., using the Bible or other sacred texts in discussions), ideological, and/or framing mechanisms that give religion its contentious structure.

Deadline for Paper Proposals: March 1st, 2019

Paper proposals should include name, affiliation, email address, title, and a 200-word abstract describing the paper’s research question, methodology, and preliminary results.

Please send paper proposal in MS Word by e-mail to the panel organizers:

Jean-Pierre Reed, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, reedjp@siu.edu and

Warren S. Goldstein, Center for Critical Research on Religion,
goldstein@criticaltheoryofreligion.org

International Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society, Annual Conference

Thursday 4th July – Saturday 6th July 2019

Edgbaston Park Hotel, Birmingham, UK.

Please note: support for attendance is available.

Organised by the Science and Belief in Society Research Group at the University of Birmingham, UK this is the first conference launching the new, International Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society.

In the last decade there has been significant growth in social scientific scholarship on science and religion, complementing the more established historical research into the subject. Greater attention is being paid to the varied ways in which perceptions of science are influenced by religious and non-religious belief, identity, community and conflict in different geographical, cultural and historical contexts. The purpose of this international conference is to bring together researchers with backgrounds in sociology, science and technology studies, psychology, political science, history, social anthropology, and related humanities or social science disciplines to discuss perspectives on the overarching topic of science and belief in society.

Abstracts are invited for the conference relating to the following themes:

  • · The social scientific and historical study of the relationship between science and religious and/or non-religious belief and identity;
  • · Public perceptions of the relationship between science, religion and non-religion and their respective roles in society;
  • · National and international comparative perspectives on the study of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · Past and present media or popular representations of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · The past or present roles of science, rationalism, religion and belief in national, social or cultural identity and related geopolitical narratives;
  • · Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of science, religion and non-religion in society;
  • · Methodological approaches to, and issues in, the study of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · Avenues for future research and developments within the social scientific and historical study of science, religion and belief in society;
  • · Public policy research relating to any aspect of public policy that intersects with issues connected to science, religion and belief in society. Including studies on theimpact of publics’ views on science and religion on policy making, and provision for religious, spiritual or non-religious communities across a range of geographies and issues (e.g. healthcare provision, educational policy, science policy, environmental policy or development);
  • · International studies of religious or spiritual communities’ perspectives on the intersection, and possible relationships, between science and religion over time.

We are interested in papers that relate to any aspect of STEMM in society (science, technology, engineering, medicine, and mathematics) and that discuss any religious, spiritual or non-religious tradition, position or worldview, including unbelief.

Keynote papers will be given by historian Professor Peter Harrison, Australian Laureate Fellow and Director of the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Queensland (Australia), and psychologist Professor Cristine Legare, associate professor of psychology and the director of the Evolution, Variation, and Ontogeny of Learning Laboratory at The University of Texas at Austin (USA).

Individual paper submissions:

To submit a paper proposal, please send an abstract of no more than 300 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 200 words including name, institutional affiliation, email address and if possible a web-link to your institutional bio page.

Biographies of successful applicants will be added to the International Network’s Research Directory when our new website launches in the spring. Please indicate on your application if you would like to opt out of being added to the Research Directory.

Panel session proposals:

We will also be accepting a limited number of panel proposals with a maximum of four speakers. To submit a panel proposal, please send a session summary of no more than 250 words alongside abstracts of no more than 300 words for each paper and biographical notes of no more than 200 words for each contributor (please include institutional affiliation(s), e-mail contact details, and other info as above).

Individual or panel session submissions may cross over several of the themes listed above, and those intending to submit papers are encouraged to consider the relevance of their work to other academic disciplines.

Please send all individual paper and session proposals to Dr Harris Wiseman (h.wiseman@bham.ac.uk) for the attention of the conference organisers, Professor Fern Elsdon-Baker (University of Birmingham), and Dr Alexander Hall (University of Birmingham).

All abstracts must be submitted by 1st March 2019.

Conference Costs and Bursaries:

Please note that for all successful applicants, accommodation and registration costs will be covered by the International Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society as part of a 1 year grant from the Templeton Religion Trust.

In addition to this, a limited number of bursaries are available to support those who may not have institutional support to attend international conferences, including but not limited to: postgraduate, early career, retired, or low income or unwaged.  To request this additional support please e-mail Dr Harris Wiseman at h.wiseman@bham.ac.uk, including your contact details, a short biography (including a clear statement regarding your career stage), your abstract and a statement of interest to be considered for one of the bursaries. We also have a range of other bursaries for covering other needs (e.g. support with day care costs). The deadline for submission of bursary applications is 1st March 2019.

Please note that we will be running a fully funded early career workshop in the days prior to this conference, but this will be announced and advertised via a separate call.

Key Dates:

Abstract submission: Open now

Deadline for abstracts and conference bursary applications: 1st March 2019

Decision notification: 15th March 2019

Registration opens: 15th March 2019

Registration deadline for presenters: 29th March 2019

Should you have other questions about the conference please contact the conference co-ordinator Dr Harris Wiseman at h.wiseman@bham.ac.uk

A digital version of this Call of Papers can be found online at:

https://sciencereligionspectrum.org/engage/events/call-for-papers-international-network-for-the-study-of-science-and-belief-in-society-annual-conference/

The conference is supported by the Templeton Religion Trust and is being held as part of the activities of the newly established International Network for the Study of Science and Belief in Society, based at the University of Birmingham. For more information about the network please contact Dr Alexander Hall (A.F.Hall@bham.ac.uk).

Call for Papers: American Academy of Religion, Nov 23-26, 2019

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Annual Meeting
San Diego, CA
November 23-26, 2019

Sociology of Religion Unit
Call for Papers

https://papers.aarweb.org/content/sociology-religion-unit

Statement of Purpose:

The Sociology of Religion (SOR) Unit of the American Academy of Religion (AAR) serves as a bridge between religious studies and the subdiscipline of sociology of religion. It functions as a two-way conduit not only to import sociological research into religious studies but also to export the research of religious studies into both the subdiscipline and the broader field of sociology. Only through a cross-fertilization transgressing departmental boundaries can there be breakthroughs in research in both fields. The unit has a wide conception of sociology of religion. It is open to a multiplicity of paradigms and methodologies utilized in the subfield and sociology more broadly: theoretical as well as empirical, quantitative, qualitative, and comparative-historical. By liaising with other Program Units, the Sociology of Religion Unit is able to bring the rich diversity of critical and analytical perspectives that are housed in the American Academy of Religion into mainstream sociology of religion. Conversely, it aims to provide scholars of the study of religion with a deeper understanding of the landscape of sociology of religion.

Call for Papers:
The purpose of the Sociology of Religion program unit of the American Academy of Religion is to bridge the gap and generate cross-fertilization between the Sociology of Religion and Religious Studies. We are open to papers in all areas and therefore encourage submissions of any topic relevant to the sociology of religion. This year, we are particularly interested in the following topics:

  • Topics related to San Diego (Immigration/Latinx experiences, militarism, etc.) and public intellectuals (which is the theme of the conference)
  • Pedagogical panel: sociology of religion is taught in both sociology and religious studies departments. However, in religious studies departments, so as not to conflict with the turf of sociology departments, it is often called “religion and society.” For this panel, we are interested in comparing how sociology of religion is taught in sociology and religious studies departments
  • W.E.B. DuBois’s relevance to the sociology of religion
  • A return to Jane Addams and others whose work refutes an epistemic split between sociology and activism
  • Relevance/relationship of quantitative to qualitative research
  • Applied sociology as a form of pubic intellectual work

Publication:
The Sociology of Religion Unit of AAR regularly co-sponsors panels with the peer-reviewed print and online journal Critical Research on Religion (CRR) (http://crr.sagepub.com). Published by SAGE Publications, the journal has over 8000 subscriptions worldwide and is ranked by Scopus #16 out of 432 religion journals (https://www.scimagojr.com/journalrank.php?category=1212). Presenters of promising papers in SOR panels will be invited to turn their papers into articles and submit them for peer review to CRR.

Method:

Please submit paper and session proposals through the AAR SOR Unit Portal: https://papers.aarweb.org/content/sociology-religion-unit

Process:
Proposals are anonymous to chairs and steering committee members during review, but visible to chairs prior to final acceptance or rejection

For further information, please contact AAR SOR Unit Co-Chairs:
Rebekka King, rebekka.king@mtsu.edu

Warren S. Goldstein, goldstein@criticaltheoryofreligion.org

Call for Papers: International Association for the Psychology of Religion

The International Association for the Psychology of Religion (IAPR) holds bi-annual conferences that serve as a meeting point for scholars from all over the world to share the latest research findings in the field.

We are pleased and honored to announce that the IAPR Conference 2019 will be held in Gdańsk, Poland and will take place from August 31st – September 3rd.

This year, we would like to summarize the current knowledge within the title Psychology of Religion and Spirituality: New Trends and Neglected Themes.

Please refer to the Conference website: https://poland2019.iaprweb.org/

  • Open registration: 1st of Nov. 2018
  • Deadline for abstracts: 1st of Feb. 2019

Organizers:

  • International Association for the Psychology of Religion
  • University of Gdańsk (Institute of Psychology)
  • Polish Society for the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality

Seeking reviewers for a special journal issue on gender, identity, and religion.

The journal Social Inclusion is preparing an issue on gender, identity and religion and is seeking reviewers for the submitted articles. 

The peer-review is expected to take place in February and the regular turnaround period for the review report is two weeks.   (Reviewers needing more days to complete the review are welcome to inform the journal’s staff).

If you are interested, please write:

António Vieira
si@cogitatiopress.com
Social Inclusion
Cogitatio Press
1070-129 Lisbon
Portugal

www.cogitatiopress.com/socialinclusion

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Seeing Religion in China: Visual Essays of Religious Sites

In order to better understand and demonstrate religion in China, the Center on Religion in Chinese Society at Purdue University invites submissions of visual essays, including pictures/videos and text, for a contest entitled “Seeing Religion in China: Visual Essays of Religious Sites.” CRCS will invite scholars and professional photographers to form a committee to judge the visual essays.

Due by April 30, 2019


PRIZES

  • Grand Prize: $1,000 (one award)
  • Second Prize: $500 (six awards)
  • Third Prize: $200 (30 awards)

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Each submission must focus on ONE specific religious site in Mainland China. A religious site can be a temple, a church, a mosque, or other type of site for religious activities.
Each visual essay should include 5 to 15 pictures (including short video clips) and 800-1,200 words (English or Chinese).
In addition to being visually attractive, the photos and text of the essays should tell a story or provide information about the religious site being depicted. This may include background and historical information, analysis of worshippers who visit the site, depiction of rituals carried out at the site, visual or textual representation of how the site is managed (leadership, relationship with state, etc.), or other relevant information. Visual essays may depict change over time, by including older photos of the site, or pictures of older and newer buildings on the same site. The text for the essay should contextualize the photos/videos, focusing on the religious site and worshippers rather than the author’s experience.
The visual essays may be presented in Word/PDF form, or may be submitted in another format, such as Esri Story Map. The photos/videos may be attached as higher resolution figures in addition to being found in the visual essays.
To learn more about photo essays, you are encourage to look at examples of recent photo essays from Time magazine and to read “Ways of  Seeing: The Contemporary Photo Essay” by Phil Bicker. 
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

  • Each participant may submit up to two visual essays.
  • Each essay should include 5 to 15 photos. (If videos are included, no more than three video clips, each no longer than 30 seconds.)
  • Essays must include complete information on the (formal) name and address of the religious site.
  • Photographs and video clips must be original, without alteration (standard optimization, such as cropping, adjustment to color and contrast, or removal of dust is acceptable).
  • Photographs should be in high-resolution JPEG format (ideally no smaller than 1920 pixels).
  • Each photo must include a caption of no more than 50 words.
  • All photographs/videos should be from the author, or list the source if not from the author. If a historical photograph is included in the essay, you must have the copyright or permission to use the image or ensure it is in the public domain.
  • The text of the essay must be 800-1,200 words in length.

In submitting a visual essay to this contest, participants agree to abide by the above instructions and acknowledge that the Center on Religion and Chinese Society holds the right to use all or parts of the visual essays, including photographs, videos, and text, in exhibitions, publications, websites and other non-commercial purposes without paying additional remuneration. The author will, however, be credited when his or her work is used.

The contest is open to all, regardless of age, sex, nationality, or country of residence. The awardees will be responsible for any taxes associated with the awards.

For details, see the CRCS website: https://www.purdue.edu/crcs/projects/visual-essay-ch/

Inquiries should be sent to crcs@purdue.edu.

DEADLINE

The deadline for submitting visual essays is April 30, 2019.
Winners will be announced by May 31, 2019.

Training Program: Research Methods for the Study of Contemporary Religion

Centre for Religion and Contemporary Society, University of Kent

25th of February to the 1st of March

This training programme is available for doctoral students registered at any higher education institution in the UK/EU and abroad. It is based on previous training developed by the Centre for Religion and Contemporary Society, funded by the AHRC, which led to the development of the Religion Methods website<http://www.kent.ac.uk/religionmethods>, and aims to provide students with a core training in fieldwork approaches to the study of religion.

Topics covered by the training will include:
  *   Conceptualising religion for research
  *   Key elements and processes of research design
  *   The role of theory in social research
  *   The politics and ethics of research
  *   Rigour and validity in research
  *   Using quantitative data-sets for research on religion
  *   Ethnographic approaches in theory and practice
  *   Developing research interviews
  *   Applying Gender and Sexuality perspectives in the study of religion
  *   Comparative sociological methods
  *   Historical methods in the study of religion
  *   Writing journal articles and Book proposals

To attend this training programme, students not registered at the University of Kent will be required to pay a £100 registration fee, which would cover attendance at all sessions and the costs of training materials. Delegates would need to make their own arrangements for accommodation, and there is a wide selection of affordable B&B provision in the Canterbury area. For those planning to commute on a daily basis, Canterbury is now less than an hour from London St Pancras on the high speed train link.

Space on the programme is limited and the deadline to register your interest to attend this programme is Tuesday 25 of January . To register your interest, please email Manoela Carpenedo ( M.carpenedo@kent.ac.uk<mailto:M.carpenedo@kent.ac.uk>) with a short statement outlining the university at which you are currently registered, the focus and method of your doctoral project and the stage of the project you are currently at.

CfP: Socrel Annual Conference "Communicating Religion" 9-11 July 2019

Sociology of Religion Study Group (SocRel) Annual Conference 2019

9-11 July 2019, Cardiff University

  • Charles Hirschkind (University of California-Berkeley)
  • Mia Lövheim (Uppsala University)
  • Jolyon Mitchell (University of Edinburgh)

As scholars of religion, we are all tasked with communicating religion in one way or another – to students, to the public, and to our research community. Moreover, what we study is itself a message: participants in our studies and creators of the documents we analyse are communicating religion, and what we receive as data is what Giddens referred to as the ‘double hermeneutic,’ or ideas and experiences that have already been mediated. What is the religion communicated to us? How do we communicate religion, and what is it that we communicate when we’re doing it?

Our focus is on “communicating” as a verb-like gerund rather than “communication” as a static, abstract noun. Scholars from different strands of the sociology of religion can imagine their work in it, and our topic engages the interests of colleagues in journalism, media and cultural studies; geography; music; English, communications and philosophy; social psychology; and law and politics.

The substance of communication can include evangelistic and apologistic discourse, education, media, and public policy interventions. We welcome diverse methodological approaches, including multi-modal and multi-sensory approaches to communicating religion. We understand communicating in multiple contexts, including academia, politics, education, social media and mass media. We imagine multiple frameworks that contour how we imagine communicating religion, encompassing the secular and the digital, the individual and the collective, the implicit and the explicit, the theoretical and the empirical.

To deliver a paper, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words, alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words. We will also be accepting a limited number of panel proposals. To deliver a panel, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words alongside a biographical note of no more than 50 words for each contributor.

Please submit your abstracts online, before midnight Friday 1 February 2019, at: https://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/abstract/Abstracts.aspx

Conference Bursaries: A limited number of bursaries are available to support postgraduate, early career, low income or unwaged SocRel members to present at the conference. Please visit https://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/24891/socrel-2019-bursary-application-form.docx for instructions, and to download an application form, and submit your bursary application along with your abstract by 1 February 2019.

Socrel is mindful of the various sensitivities people carry concerning content. If you feel that the presentation you give may include material that may be upsetting, please consider including a note about this content in your abstract. We will not restrict or censor presentations that include sensitive or alarming content, but by flagging it in the abstract, those who attend the conference can make informed decisions on which panel they might choose to attend.

  • Abstract submission: Open now
  • Early bird registration opens: 3 November 2018
  • Abstract submission closes: 1 February 2019
  • Decision notification: 15 February 2019
  • Presenter registration closes: 29 March 2019
  • Early bird registration closes: 7 June 2019
  • Registration closes: 28 June 2019

Please note that after 7 June 2019, a £50 late registration fee will apply to all bookings.

Should you have other questions about the conference please also contact the conference organisers, Dr Michael Munnik (Cardiff University) or Dr Peter Hemming (Cardiff University) socrel19@cardiff.ac.ukmailto:socrel19@cardiff.ac.uk

For further details, visit the SocRel website: www.britsoc.co.uk/groups/study-groups/sociology-of-religion-study-group/<http://www.britsoc.co.uk/groups/study-groups/sociology-of-religion-study-group/> For further details about the BSA visit www.britsoc.co.uk<http://www.britsoc.co.uk/>